Training medical students how to teach helps them embrace ambiguity

first_img Medical students need to be quizzed, but ‘pimping’ isn’t effective @jasmine_rana17 In volunteering to help teach the course, neither of us anticipated that questions asked by first-year medical students would heighten our curiosity and passion for medicine. But they did. We looked for answers and followed up with the students who asked them. In the process, we also reflected on how to be better self-directed learners and more effective teachers.When it comes to teaching, medicine is unique. In music and sports, for example, teachers and coaches tend to be experts, like a concert pianist or former professional soccer player. In medicine, it’s junior doctors who do a fair amount of the teaching. In one study about the transmission of medical knowledge, medical students estimated that one-third of their clinical education on hospital wards came from resident physicians — doctors in training only a few years out of medical school.Even though teaching is a core skill for physicians, little emphasis has been placed on training residents how to teach. The Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education, the organization responsible for accrediting most of the graduate medical training programs for physicians in the US, has mandated that residency programs spend time training their residents how to teach. Many residencies even have dedicated resident-as-teacher programs. In reality, though, it is a challenge to prioritize such programs while residents are working 80 hours a week learning to care for patients.That, in part, has been an impetus for the rise of student-as-teacher programs. As the name implies, these are designed to help medical students learn teaching skills. If they can begin their post-med school residencies with effective teaching strategies, they will be better prepared to transmit knowledge and teach the medical students they encounter and, in turn, be able to focus more of their time developing patient care skills.Our experience teaching first-year medical students brought home another important benefit of student-as-teacher programs: They help students learn how to grapple with uncertainty and ambiguity.In medical education, there is traditionally little or no focus on helping trainees build comfort within the “gray space” of practicing medicine. As one of our favorite teachers, Dr. Richard Schwartzstein, likes to say about patients who do not have classical symptoms of an illness, “Patients don’t always read the textbook.” Yet textbooks are the primary learning resource that we use as medical students, which may constrain our ability to acknowledge the full spectrum and variation of disease. Moreover, senior physicians often “pimp” students with obscure black-and-white factual questions. Many rightly argue that this old-school practice needs to change because uncertainty and ambiguity are intrinsic to the practice of medicine — and our ways of teaching and learning should reflect that. In our experience as student teachers, we found ourselves embracing ambiguity instead of shying away from it. Explaining nuanced clinical topics to junior learners made us more aware of the limitations of our knowledge and our initial knee-jerk desire to provide black-and-white answers, like those found on board exams. Being able to reflect on our understanding of the topics we have taught has also given us more confidence to acknowledge context and complexity in medical care, which are often not captured fully in exams or textbooks.Perhaps most importantly, we are learning to value academic humility, which is arguably a prerequisite for a career path that requires lifelong learning and curiosity. This made us more comfortable answering learners’ questions with, “I don’t know,” followed by, “Let’s look this up together” — a strategy we also plan to use in our interactions with patients.Although more outcomes-based research needs to be done about peer teaching, existing research and anecdotes support many of our positive experiences as student teachers. A recent meta-analysis concluded that learners do just as well whether they are taught by student teachers or faculty members, alleviating a common concern often voiced by faculty members and student learners about “non-expert” student teachers.In addition to having us teach medical students, the elective we took part in included how-to-teach sessions given by local clinician-educators. Such carefully designed student-as-teacher programs can benefit everyone involved.The culture of medicine in which we learn and practice needs to evolve from “see one, do one, teach one” to more thoughtful ways of teaching and learning that embrace multi-dimensional thinking instead of black-and-white answers. Teaching medical students how to teach may be one way to build for them more nuanced, collaborative, and curiosity-driven learning environments. Ultimately, it is patients who will benefit the most from having doctors who are comfortable working with their patients in the increasingly nuanced world of medicine where uncertainty and ambiguity are common.Jasmine Rana and Taylor Freret are MD candidates in Harvard Medical School’s class of 2017. Tags educationphysicians Medical education needs to take ‘an ounce of prevention’ seriously Related: Related: Jasmine Rana By Jasmine Rana and Taylor Freret May 22, 2017 Reprints “That’s a good question.” We looked at each other, wondering if either of us had an answer, and then uttered the sentence that became commonplace during our stint as student teachers: “We don’t know.” [email protected] About the Authors Reprints Taylor Weidman/Getty Images Just months away from our medical school graduation, we found ourselves teaching in the first-year physiology course we had taken what seemed like eons ago.“Should you give fluids to a patient with a myocardial infarction?” a student asked.We had spent the past four years learning from textbooks and doctors and patients. This teaching experience was making us realize how much we had learned and, more important, how much we had yet to learn.advertisement Taylor Freret “It depends,” we began, taking turns explaining how the location of the infarction (more commonly known as a heart attack) and the patient’s signs and symptoms determine whether to give intravenous fluids.“How do you know what pressor to use?” another student asked, referring to the class of medications used to raise blood pressure.advertisement [email protected] First OpinionTraining medical students how to teach helps them embrace ambiguity last_img read more

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The Ebola response effort is struggling. Experts say these steps could help

first_img Could an emergency declaration over Ebola make a bad situation worse? @HelenBranswell By Helen Branswell May 22, 2019 Reprints With Ebola response teams struggling to contain the outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, the World Health Organization and its partners can make changes to shore up their effort and try to prevent the crisis from escalating further, according to a handful of experts surveyed by STAT.The experts are wary of criticizing WHO officials and others trying desperately to stop the virus from spreading. Violence aimed at Ebola response workers and a refusal to cooperate with control measures in some communities has rendered this outbreak, the second largest on record, unlike anything the world of Ebola responders has seen before. There have been repeated attacked on Ebola treatment centers, and on many days response workers have been unable to move about in outbreak hotspots.At the same time, the experts believe global health officials have opportunities to bolster their efforts.advertisement If Ebola treatment centers are seen as toxic, find alternativesIn some communities, there remains deep-seated reluctance to go to Ebola treatment centers. Doctors Without Borders, which pioneered the current system of Ebola treatment centers, has suggested diversifying care options might help.ETCs, as they are called, have become a place of stigma, associated with death. In fact, people who seek care in treatment centers quickly after the onset of symptoms have a higher chance of survival than those who eschew the centers — but that reality has not been recognized in the affected communities.Doctors Without Borders has proposed that some hospitals in the outbreak zone be trained to treat Ebola patients safely — without posing a risk to their other patients — because the reality is that many people with Ebola symptoms turn to clinics or hospitals rather than ETCs.Likewise, the group has urged the health ministry to consider allowing for some home care of Ebola patients, even suggesting that experimental Ebola drugs might be administered by a team of visiting health workers to some patients being cared for at home.Ronsse said ETCs should remain the primary sites for care of Ebola patients. But with so many patients refusing to go for to them, finding ways to minimize the risk these patients present to the health workers who care for them in hospitals or family members in households could help reduce transmission. Recently the WHO reported that 68% of the people who have died from Ebola in this outbreak died in the community — at home or in a health facility that was not a treatment center.“It’s something else we could do,” Ronsse explained. “But we cannot do only home-based care or only treatment at the level of the health center. We should have the three levels.”Likewise, Ronsse said home care — which would involve training family members to take precautions and giving them protective equipment and cleaning materials — is not something that could be done on a large scale. “It’s really for the people who would not accept to come to the center,” she said. Rollin, who is following the outbreak closely, is worried about the fact that so few probable cases are being added to the outbreak totals. Probable cases are people who had Ebola-like symptoms and who had contact with people who either were known cases or who also had what looked like Ebola. Often these are people who died and were buried without being tested for the disease, but for whom there is a high likelihood that they were infected.Given how many people are refusing to cooperate with the Ebola response teams — staying home when they are sick, fighting off safe burial teams that try to test corpses — there should be a steady stream of probable cases, Rollin said. And yet they are rare. “So they’re missing a lot of cases,” he said.Lab capacity needs to be increasedThere are serious concerns that the existing laboratory capacity to test samples from suspected Ebola cases can no longer keep pace with the number of tests that need to be conducted.DRC’s National Biomedical Research Institute — INRB — is overseeing the testing. Rollin and others fear the current needs exceed its capacity, leading to delays in getting test results.“The lab is overwhelmed,” Rollin said. HealthThe Ebola response effort is struggling. Experts say these steps could help Related: Related: Tags infectious diseasepublic healthVaccines Comparing the Covid-19 vaccines developed by Pfizer, Moderna, and Johnson & Johnson Newsletters Sign up for Morning Rounds Your daily dose of news in health and medicine. Please enter a valid email address. Senior Writer, Infectious Disease Helen covers issues broadly related to infectious diseases, including outbreaks, preparedness, research, and vaccine development. Helen Branswell Trending Now: Privacy Policy Here are three.Good data are keyThe foundation of any Ebola response is epidemiology. Knowing where the virus is spreading and who is in its path is crucial to bringing an Ebola epidemic under control. But from the earliest days of this outbreak, that’s been a problem.advertisement ‘On a knife edge’: Ebola outbreak threatens to escalate as violence rises About the Author Reprints Health workers carry the coffin containing of an Ebola victim in Butembo, in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. JOHN WESSELS/AFP/Getty Images “I don’t think there is a good record of what’s going on. I don’t think there’s a good database,” said Dr. Pierre Rollin, a veteran Ebola responder who retired earlier this year from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “We’re just driving in the fog because we don’t have good data.”Every single previous Ebola outbreak was stopped using the same techniques: find the cases and isolate them so they cannot infect more people. Figure out with whom they’ve had contact and monitor those people daily. If any of them become ill, isolate them and find their contacts. Bury the dead safely, so that funeral rituals don’t end up infecting more people.In this outbreak, responders have had an additional tool: an experimental vaccine.For this approach to work, though, the surveillance teams need to know in which social networks the Ebola virus is spreading. In this outbreak, that often hasn’t been the case. Significant numbers of the new cases were not previously on contact lists. Their health hadn’t been monitored and they weren’t offered vaccine because no one knew they had been exposed.The impact of these unidentified chains of transmission appears to be growing as the outbreak expands. Since the beginning of May, only one-third of new cases were known contacts of a previous case. Only about half of those had agreed to be monitored to see if they were developing symptoms. Most had not agreed to be vaccinated.Dr. Scott Dowell, deputy director for surveillance and epidemiology at the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, shares concerns about the expanding number of unrecognized cases.“I think there is very likely a large pool of unrecognized transmission out there and unidentified patients,” said Dowell, who worked for decades for the CDC and has worked a number of Ebola responses. “And it’s uncertain just how big that pool is. And also uncertain to me about whether the current response can get on top of it, which is really worrisome.” Leave this field empty if you’re human: If a laboratory can’t quickly process all the tests taken, it is effectively capping the number of new positive cases that can be found, said Dowell. It’s not that they aren’t there; it’s that the lab can’t pinpoint them in a timely manner. That leads to slowdowns in identifying the contacts of new cases and inviting them to be vaccinated. People who need vaccine may be vaccinated too late to prevent infection.The delays in getting test results are also discouraging people from coming forward to be tested, said Dr. Axelle Ronsse, an emergency coordinator for the Belgian branch of Doctors Without Borders. Test results can sometimes take two or three days.The Gates Foundation is urging the Congolese Ministry of Health and the WHO to start using rapid point-of-care tests that were developed after the West African Ebola outbreak of 2014-2016, said Dowell, who noted these tests could greatly increase the number of people who are tested.There’s a concern the tests could lead to some false negatives — people who are actually infected, but don’t test positive — Dowell admitted. But finding more infected people more quickly, even if it’s not all of them, should help, he said.The lab capacity issue also extends to the sequencing of Ebola viruses, a technique that can be used to fill in information gaps of chains of transmission when, as with this outbreak, they occur.Newly confirmed cases may not know where or how they became infected. But by comparing the sequence of their virus to the sequences of other cases, it can become clear that the infection occurred when two unrelated people were in a clinic on the same day, or that this patient likely infected that taxi driver.INRB, the Congolese national lab, has been sequencing viruses. But the information it is finding isn’t always being shared in a timely way with the teams doing case surveillance. And capacity is an issue here as well. “As the number of daily positives has grown, the sequencing hasn’t nearly kept pace with those positives,” Dowell said.A report to the World Health Assembly from a group that advises the WHO’s emergencies program hinted at insufficient use of the sequencing data, saying that “timely analysis of genetic sequencing data are critical to fully characterize the evolution of the [Ebola] outbreak in order to inform diagnostic, vaccine and treatment approaches.” It recommended “closer collaboration between INRB and WHO.”last_img read more

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BREAKING: Woman struck down by lorry in road accident near Laois border

first_imgHome News Community BREAKING: Woman struck down by lorry in road accident near Laois border NewsCommunity Pinterest By Siun Lennon – 13th February 2019 Twitter Facebook Pinterest New Arles road opens but disquiet over who was invited to official opening WhatsApp Community Facebook Emergency services are at the scene of a serious road accident in Athy after a woman was knocked down by a lorry on the bridge in the town opposite AIB.The woman was knocked down by a lorry while she was crossing the road at lunchtime today, Wednesday, February 13.Emergency services are now on the scene.The accident occurred around lunchtime and ambulance and Gardaí are now at the scene.Traffic is slow in the area and is being diverted around the town.People are being advised to follow this diverted route.SEE ALSO – Tullamore and Portlaoise Hospital waiting times ‘unacceptable’ BREAKING: Woman struck down by lorry in road accident near Laois border TAGSroad traffic accident WhatsApp Council Charlie Flanagan on Electric Picnic: ‘I’d ask organisers to consult with community leaders’ Previous articleWATCH: Laois man captures epic Electric Picnic experienceNext articleLISTEN: Saturday night lights for Laois hurlers, footballers back to winning ways and a tough weekend for Laois ladies footballers Siun Lennonhttp://heresosiun.blogspot.ie/2016/09/the-lekkie-piccie-experience.htmlSiún Lennon joined LaoisToday in a full-time capacity after studying Journalism and New Media in the University of Limerick. She hails from Rosenallis and her interests vary from news, sports and politics. RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Laois secondary school announces scholarship winners for new academic year Community Twitterlast_img read more

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Coronavirus: Six further deaths and 183 new cases as caution urges around Christmas gatherings

first_img82 are men/101 are women60% are under 45 years of ageThe median age is 36 years old56 in Dublin, 26 in Donegal, 13 in Limerick, 11 in Kilkenny, 11 in Monaghan and the remaining 66 cases are spread across 15 other counties.As of 2pm today, 239 COVID-19 patients are hospitalised, of which 32 are in ICU. 10 additional hospitalisations in the past 24 hours.The COVID-19 Dashboard provides up-to-date information on the key indicators of COVID-19 in the community. Laois Councillor ‘amazed’ at Electric Picnic decision to apply for later date for 2021 festival Coronavirus: Six further deaths and 183 new cases as caution urges around Christmas gatherings Pinterest TAGSCoronavirus By Steven Miller – 3rd December 2020 RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Electric Picnic organisers release statement following confirmation of new festival date WhatsApp Facebook Pinterest Facebook Electric Picnic apply to Laois County Council for new date for this year’s festivalcenter_img Twitter December 1 – 55.5November 30 – 55.5November 29 – 51.9November 28 – 50.8November 27 – 55.5November 26 – 57.9November 25 – 54.3November 24 – 54.3November 23 – 49.6November 22 – 57.9November 21 – 60.2November 20 – 80.3November 19 – 83.8November 18 – 95.6New cases in Laois during past 14 daysDecember 2December 1 – 47November 30 – 47November 29 – 44November 28 – 43November 27 – 47November 26 – 49November 25 – 46November 24 – 46November 23 – 42November 22 – 49November 21 – 51November 20 – 68November 19 – 71November 18 – 81‘Be on highest level of guard’ as Christmas approachesPeople in Ireland are facing into the highest risk Christmas of their lives, the chief executive of the (HSE) has declared.With the phased relaxation over the festive period of restrictions to curb the spread of Covid-19, Paul Reid said there is the understandable temptation for the public to drop its guard in the fight against the coronavirus.As people meet in restaurants when they reopen over the weekend, they will naturally want to hug loved ones and friends as they part again, while generations will mix in indoor settings for days over Christmas itself, he pointed out.“It is a heightened level of risk,” he warned.“This is going to be the highest risk Christmas probably any of us have experienced across the board.”Speaking during a press conference at Dublin’s Dr Steevens’ Hospital, Mr Reid said there has been much talk of another lockdown in January if cases soar again because of the festive easing of restrictions but that “it doesn’t have to be that way if we take all of the precautions and do the simple things very well”.While encouraging people to enjoy the holidays and meeting their families, he urged them to “be on their highest level of guard” over the coming weeks.People’s private homes continue to be the main scene of Covid-19 outbreaks amid growing concern about Christmas gatherings and the risk of spreading the infection.New figures again show the ease with which people can get the virus in their own homes.While outbreaks in private houses fell to 262 last week, when a full lockdown was still in place, they continue to be a hot spot even before festivities have begun.There were 21 outbreaks in workplaces including food factories and 12 in schools. Another 10 struck hospitals which have resulted in patients being infected and hundreds of staff having to take leave.SEE ALSO – November car sales in Laois slightly up as key New Year selling period moves close A further six Coronavirus-related deaths have been announced by the health authorities this evening as well as 183 new cases.It is the lowest number of daily cases since September 12.There were no new cases in Laois meaning the 14-day incidence rate in the county drops to  50.8 – down from 55.5 yesterday. The Laois 14-day rate was 54.3 this time last week and 95.6 a week earlier.The current national average is 79.7 down from 84.7 yesterday.There are now 43 active cases in Laois, down from 47 yesterday. It was 81 two weeks ago and 47 last week.Chief Medical Officer Dr Tony Holohan said that it is “important to keep up the progress that we have achieved in recent weeks”.“Ireland now has the lowest 14-day incidence of Covid-19 in the EU, according the latest ECDC figures, and we need to hold firm to this position,” Holohan said.Of the cases notified today; Previous articleRetired Laois Garda unveils third instalment of crime thrillerNext article2020 Remembered: Laois hotel named second best in Ireland and UK by prestigious magazine Steven Millerhttp://www.laoistoday.ieSteven Miller is owner and managing editor of LaoisToday.ie. From Laois, Steven studied Journalism in DCU and has 14 years experience in the media, almost 10 of those in an editorial role. Husband of Emily, father of William and Lillian, he’s happiest when he’s telling stories or kicking a point. Electric Picnic Home News Community Coronavirus: Six further deaths and 183 new cases as caution urges around… NewsCommunity Electric Picnic Electric Picnic WhatsApp New Cases in LaoisDecember 2 – December 1 – 1November 30 – 5November 29 – 2November 28 – 2November 27 – 4November 26 – 4November 25 – 6November 24 – 5November 23 – 1November 22 – 2November 21 – 1November 20 – 5November 19 – 3November 18 – 314-day case rate in Laois per 100,000 population Twitterlast_img read more

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Regulators publish guidelines for Basel III requirements

first_imgJames Langton Keywords Disclosure,  LeverageCompanies Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions CSA sets rules on non-GAAP financial reporting Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Regulators propose slimming corporate disclosure Earlier this year, global banking regulators (the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision) issued final rules on the leverage ratio framework and disclosure requirements under Basel III. That framework introduces “a simple, transparent, non-risk based leverage ratio to act as a credible supplementary measure to the risk-based capital requirements,” OSFI notes. Starting Jan. 1, 2015, the framework also includes requirements for making public disclosure of the ratio along with the publication of the financial statements. OSFI indicates that it expects Canadian banks that are considered domestic systemically-important banks (DSIBs) to fully implement the leverage disclosure requirements for the first quarter of 2015 reporting. And, it will require non-DSIBs to fully implement the disclosures for yearend 2015 reporting. It also says that it expects that DSIBs will adopt all future disclosure recommendations that are endorsed by international standard setters.center_img Related news Canadian banking regulators have published new guidelines for banks on their obligation to disclose their leverage ratios under the new Basel III capital regime. The Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions (OSFI) has published guidance for banks on the implementation of the leverage ratio disclosure requirements. The draft guideline sets out OSFI’s expectations for the content, format, and frequency of leverage disclosure. Facebook LinkedIn Twitter Don’t believe the hype: BCSC proposes new rules for stock promoterslast_img read more

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Stock indices relatively flat ahead of Memorial Day weekend

first_img The June gold contract soared US$11.70 to US$1,268.10 an ounce, while the S&P/TSX global gold index gained 0.74%. “We’re still seeing the U.S. dollar sub-performing and I think that’s giving gold some support,” said Andrew Pyle, a senior wealth adviser at Scotia Wealth Management. The U.S. dollar’s lacklustre performance comes in part from doubts about whether the U.S. Federal Reserve will raise rates at its June meeting, as well as economic conditions not showing enough acceleration, he said. Meanwhile, the July crude oil contract rose US90¢ to US$49.80 per barrel, helping the energy sector in Toronto gain 0.39%. The increase came a day after investors showed disappointment over OPEC’s decision to extend production cuts by nine months. Some had hoped for deeper and longer cuts. “A little bit of a bounce back was to be expected today,” Pyle said. “I think yesterday’s drop was probably exaggerated.” In New York, the Dow Jones industrial average shed 2.67 points to 21,080.28. The S&P 500 index gained a meagre three-quarters of a point to a record-high 2,415.82, while the Nasdaq composite index rose 4.93 points to a record-high 6,210.19. The U.S. markets will be closed Monday for the Memorial Day holiday. The Canadian dollar fell 0.01 of a U.S. cent to an average price of US74.32¢. Elsewhere in commodities, the July natural gas contract advanced US3.5¢ to US$3.31 per mmBTU and the July copper contract shed about US3.2¢ to roughly US$2.57 a pound. Aleksandra Sagan North American stock markets were relatively flat Friday, while the price of oil rebounded after dropping nearly US$2.50 a barrel the day before. The S&P/TSX composite index inched forward 6.20 points to 15,416.93 as the gold sector led the way. Related news Toronto stock market dips on weakness in the energy and financials sectors TSX gets lift from financials, U.S. markets rise to highest since Marchcenter_img Keywords Marketwatch S&P/TSX composite hits highest close since March on strength of financials sector Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Facebook LinkedIn Twitterlast_img read more

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Scotiabank Q2 net income up from year ago, but falls short of expectations

Keywords EarningsCompanies Bank of Nova Scotia Facebook LinkedIn Twitter Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Scotia makes portfolio advisor changes Adjusting for items such as costs related to various acquisitions in recent months, Scotiabank’s profit amounted to $2.26 billion for its second quarter, up from $2.19 billion during the same period in 2018.That amounted to adjusted earnings per diluted share of $1.70, down from $1.71 a year ago.Scotiabank’s earnings fell short of the $1.74 expected by analysts, according to Thomson Reuters Eikon.The bank’s provisions for credit losses, or money set aside for bad loans, amounted to $873 million during the quarter, up from $534 million a year earlier. This figure, however, includes Day 1 provisions for credit losses related to Scotiabank’s recent acquisitions in Peru and the Dominican Republic as required by accounting rules. Adjusting for this, the bank’s provisions for credit losses amounted to $722 million.“Overall, we delivered solid results across the bank in the second quarter,” Scotiabank chief executive Brian Porter said in a statement.“We have made good progress towards strengthening our businesses and offering a superior customer experience. Looking ahead, we remain focused on delivering against our differentiated strategy and achieving consistent long-term growth.”The lender’s Canadian banking division posted net income of $1.05 billion, up 3% from $1.02 billion during the second quarter of 2018. After adjusting for acquisition-related costs, net income was $1.06 billion, up 4%. The bank said the uptick was due largely to higher revenue driven by loan and deposit growth and the impact of acquisitions. This was partly offset by higher non-interest expenses and higher provision for credit losses, among other things.Its international banking division generated net income of $769 million, up 3.2% from $745 million a year earlier. After adjusting for acquisition and divestiture related costs, the division’s net income amounted to $787 million, up 15% from a year ago.Scotiabank, which has invested heavily in its footprint across Latin America, said the growth was driven by higher net interest income due to strong loan growth in the Pacific Alliance countries of Chile, Colombia, Mexico and Peru, as well as the impact of acquisitions and higher non-interest income. However, this was offset by higher non-interest expenses and higher provisions for credit losses, among other things.Scotiabank’s global banking and markets arm, however, reported net income of $420 million for the quarter, marking a 6% drop from $447 million a year earlier. The bank said this stemmed from lower net-interest income, higher non-interest expenses and lower recovery of provisions for credit losses. This was partially offset by higher non-interest income, the favourable impact of foreign currency translation and lower income taxes.The bank’s common equity tier one capital ratio, a key measure of its financial health, was at 11.1% as of April 30. This was in line with the prior quarter, but down from 12% during the second quarter of 2018.The earnings miss was driven by higher provisions for credit losses, which were higher than expected, said Gabriel Dechaine, an analyst with National Bank of Canada Financial Markets.Scotiabank’s international business growth was good, but underlying growth in its domestic personal and commercial banking arm was flat, he added.“Capital markets earnings growth was negative, though trading and advisory revenues exceeded our forecasts,” he said in a note to clients. The Bank of Nova Scotia reported second-quarter net income of $2.26 billion, up from $2.18 billion a year earlier, helped by its earnings from its international footprint, but fell short of expectations as loan loss provisions jumped.The Toronto-based lender’s earnings for the three-month period ended April 30 amounted to $1.73 per diluted share, compared with $1.70 a year earlier. U.S. corporate profits rising for the first time since pandemic began One year after price collapse, expectations are high for oil company earnings Canadian banks, bellwethers of pandemic recovery, to reveal key statistics this week Related news Canadian Press read more

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Partnership Needed to Fight Crime in St. Thomas

first_imgAdvertisements RelatedPartnership Needed to Fight Crime in St. Thomas Partnership Needed to Fight Crime in St. Thomas UncategorizedNovember 29, 2008 FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail Commanding officer in charge of St. Thomas, Deputy Superintendent Jonathan Morrison, has called for a partnership between the police and citizens in preventing and solving crime in the parish.“We prefer to have crime prevention than crime protection. You can’t bring back a dead person so we want to stop it from happening. We have to be proactive,” Deputy Superintendent Morrison stated as he addressed a Local Government Month symposium on November 26 at the Morant Villas Conference Room in Morant Bay.Deputy Superintendent Morrison said that since he assumed duties on September 15, some seven homicides have been committed in the parish. “There is a volatile situation as far as extortion is concerned in this parish and it may contribute to some of the murders that are past and it’s going to contribute to some that are to come,” he said, adding that the police will be working to address the situation.In the meantime, he informed that 35 murders have been committed in the parish since the start of the year, compared to 35 for the entire 2007. He said that efforts were being made to solve these crimes but the witnesses, who have been identified, were afraid to come forward.Referring to the recent brutal attacks on children, the Superintendent expressed concern about the number of unsupervised small children on the streets.“I see children on the streets, on the lonely Pamphret roads, back and forth. I see children unprotected on the highways and I see young women also unprotected and I worry when I see that,” he bemoaned.The symposium, held under the theme: ‘Local Government Reform, putting governance in your hands,’ was organized by the St. Thomas Parish Council in collaboration with the St. Thomas Parish Development Committee and the Social Development Commission.center_img RelatedPartnership Needed to Fight Crime in St. Thomas RelatedPartnership Needed to Fight Crime in St. Thomaslast_img read more

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Great Bear Lake Remediation Project

first_imgGreat Bear Lake Remediation Project From: Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs CanadaBackgrounderThe Great Bear Lake Remediation Project consists of reclaiming a number of now-abandoned mining and exploration properties which are now the responsibility of the Government of Canada.Silver Bear Mines (including the Terra, Northrim, Norex and Graham Vein, and Smallwood sites)Contact Lake MineEl Bonanza/Bonanza MineSawmill BayThese properties are approximately 250 km east of Délı̨nę and within the Sahtu Dene and Métis Comprehensive Land Claim. A portion of the geographic area of the Silver Bear Mines also overlaps with the Tłı̨chǫ Mǫwhì Gogha Dè Nįįłèè Boundary.In addition, the sites which compose the Great Bear Lake Remediation Project are all located within the Tsá Tué Biosphere Reserve. This internationally recognized designation by UNESCO reflects the Délı̨nę community’s passion for maintaining the health of the lake, its watershed and the animals that inhabit it.Maintaining the ecological integrity of Great Bear Lake and its watershed is of utmost importance to the people of Délı̨nę. As such, the sites will be remediated to a standard that is consistent with the objectives of the Tsá Tué Biosphere Reserve.The Great Bear Lake Remediation Project is funded through the Northern Abandoned Mine Reclamation Program. Budget 2019 invested $49.9 million over 15 years ($2.2 billion on a cash basis), starting in 2020-21 to create the Northern Abandoned Mine Reclamation Program to exclusively address the largest and highest-risk abandoned mines in the Northwest Territories and the Yukon.At the end of the 15-year program, active remediation is expected to be complete at seven of the eight mine sites. However, all sites will likely require ongoing care and monitoring to ensure the remediation measures continue working as planned. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:Canada, cash, community, exploration, Government, mining, project, Unescolast_img read more

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Stanford funds community projects to address pandemic challenges

first_imgStanford funds community projects to address pandemic challenges The Office of Community Engagement, in collaboration with the Bill Lane Center for the American West, has provided over $200,000 in funding to faculty-led projects co-created with community organizations in San Mateo and Santa Clara counties to accelerate solutions to pandemic impacts. By Joel Berman Stanford is concentrating on local impacts of COVID-19 in its latest effort to respond to the effects of the public health pandemic that has exacerbated systemic inequities and created new ones in surrounding communities.The university’s Office of Community Engagement (OCE), in collaboration with the Bill Lane Center for the American West in the School of Humanities and Sciences, announced that eight faculty-led projects will receive a total of $228,000 to work with community-based organizations and government agencies in Santa Clara County and San Mateo County. Awardees were selected by a cross-campus faculty and staff selection committee through a competitive process.The projects focus on addressing pandemic-related impacts in four areas severely affected by the virus: health, education, social services and the arts. Health-related projects include improving access to COVID-19 information and vaccines in under-resourced communities and supporting youth mental health through the convening of a diverse Youth Advisory Group. Efforts in the social services space aim to reduce pretrial incarceration rates by helping people make their court appearances, and advancing equity for predominantly minority and undocumented communities. Meanwhile, arts and education projects will seek to connect East Palo Alto youth to emerging creative practices and tools, develop a summer internship program for Foothill College students interested in pursuing humanities-adjacent careers or courses of study and provide in-person recovery learning opportunities for K-8 students in Sunnyvale.“The Stanford community has stepped up in many ways to work with our neighbors and local leaders as we deal with the many difficult challenges created by COVID-19. The university is committed to supporting that continued engagement as we move into the next phase of recovery and ultimately beyond the pandemic,” said Martin Shell, vice president and chief external relations officer. “The pandemic has underscored the need for many vital services, especially for the most vulnerable residents of this area. The Stanford community has been active in helping many groups in our region, and we are grateful to the many faculty members who are leading the way to deepen collaboration with community organizations in service to the community.”OCE received 45 proposals from across the university. Seventeen applicants were advanced to the final stage, where the selection committee determined the eight finalists, which span five of the seven schools with faculty representing Engineering, Law, Humanities and Sciences (H&S), Education and Medicine. Each grant recipient includes a community collaborator from San Mateo or Santa Clara counties who has co-created time-bound projects to accelerate results.Bruce Cain, political scientist and faculty director of the Lane Center, said he is pleased to support OCE’s efforts by offering Lane Center funds to the research-practice partnership led by Stanford Impact Labs. The Labs are a new university model that connects academic expertise to pressing challenges. “Regional coordination and collaboration are critical, and OCE is helping connect our campus to those practitioners who see the greatest needs firsthand.”Moving with communityFaculty are already working with their collaborators on the projects, with many planning to launch this quarter. The OCE grants offer a quicker infusion of funding to accelerate and deepen work by faculty in the community. In part, recipients were chosen by how quickly they could deploy OCE funding to support existing work to meet pressing needs in the community.“Given the impact the pandemic has had on our region, it was important that we accelerate the community benefit of the grants by focusing on projects that can move quickly to help those in need,” said Megan Swezey Fogarty, associate vice president for community engagement. “These projects are addressing both challenges that existed before COVID-19 and were made worse over the last year, as well as some new ones that resulted from the pandemic.”Grant recipients pointed to the timeliness of the funding in helping to scale their work and reach additional people during this period of increased demand for services and support.“This funding will allow us to deepen our community of practice for local promotoras de salud or community health workers and expand our work to co-create culturally appropriate outreach materials for local Latinx communities,” said Patricia Rodriguez Espinosa, associate director of research in the Stanford Medicine Office of Community Engagement and instructor in the Department of Epidemiology and Population Health. “The grant will support both our on-the-ground work in Santa Clara County and capacity building for community health workers in neighboring Santa Cruz and San Mateo counties through the development and sharing of new trainings and resources.”Said Tem Woldeyesus, clinical assistant professor in Stanford Medicine’s Division of Primary Care and Population Health: “We must support building digital capacity to potentiate ongoing efforts by our community partners, such as Roots Community Health Center, to address widening racial disparities due to the pandemic. OCE funding has been an essential first step in overcoming the tremendous challenges ahead of us in advancing health equity.”Below is a list of the funded projects. For a description of each project, along with the collaborating faculty members and community organizations, click here.Health and social servicesCommunity Health Workers Promoting COVID-19 Vaccine Awareness and Public Health Guidelines in Latinx Communitiesallcove Youth – Amplifying Youth Mental Health Services and VoicesBridging Technological Divide in Pandemic Resources for Marginalized CommunitiesLocal Impact Labs University CollaborativePilot Interventions to Reduce Pretrial IncarcerationEducation and the artsEmerging Creative Practices: Teacher Training and Curriculum Development for Youth Arts EducationDigital Humanities Research & Training for Foothill College StudentsCo-Teaching Mentorship with Sunnyvale School District – Supplemental Teaching & Learning Experience for STEP Graduates /Public Release. 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