Sacha Baron Cohen Is Not Involved With The Freddie Mercury Biopic

first_imgUPDATE [3/28]: Apparently Queen manager Jim Beach’s statement at the Artist and Manager Awards was taken out of context, and were actually said in jest. The initial report from Musicweek.com claims that Sacha Baron Cohen will write, produce, direct, and star in the Queen biopic, but in actuality, Beach said that Cohen would be “starring in all four major roles” as a joke. Considering the updated information comes from Queen guitarist Brian May’s personal blog, we’re (unfortunately) inclined to believe him.We apologize for the error that we and many other outlets made; we just can’t help but think that Cohen’s resemblance to Freddie Mercury is uncanny.****After a long-winded, ongoing back-and-forth between Sacha Baron Cohen and members of Queen, a Freddie Mercury biopic will finally go into production. Cohen will not only star in the film, but also write, direct and produce it.Talks about the film began around 2010. Cohen didn’t share the same vision as remaining members of Queen, and left the project around 2013. According to Time, he wasn’t seeing eye to eye with the other members, who were aiming for a more PG version whereas Cohen wanted a “gritty R-rated tell-all” of the rockstar’s life. Apparently, they’ve quelled their disagreements, and plans to resume production of the biopic have been announced.“You have probably followed the saga of the famous Queen-Freddie Mercury biopic which has been developing in Hollywood for the last seven years,” said Queen’s manager Jim Beach at the Artist and Manager Awards. “An important breakthrough is that we have now managed to persuade Sacha Baron Cohen to write, produce, and direct this movie, and he has also agreed to star.”[Via Musicweek.com]last_img read more

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SMC Hypatia Day encourages learning in math & science

first_img­DNA extractions, Fibonacci numbers and bouncy ball polymers were the main attractions of Saint Mary’s 21st annual Hypatia Day on Saturday. The event, named for the first female mathematician and scientist in recorded history — Hypatia of Alexandria — is aimed to inspire local seventh grade girls to study math, science and engineering. “The event is for the seventh graders to get them involved in doing fun math and science activities led by all of our student clubs,” Kristin Jehring, mathematics professor and director of Hypatia Day, said. To qualify for participation, Jehring said students apply for the event after their teachers nominate them. “We send out materials to the math and science teachers to the schools in the greater Michigan area,” she said. “They nominate a couple students that they think would benefit and should be encouraged to continue their math and science education.” This year, 95 students were selected. The students, along with their parents, started the day with a welcome from Jehring and a keynote address by Abby Weppler, local meteorologist for WSBT-TV. From there, students from various clubs lead hands-on activities for the girls, Jehring said. “The chemistry club [lead an activity with] bouncy balls to learn about polymers,” she said. In addition, the Biology Club worked with the girls on extracting DNA from strawberries and learning about dissection to experiencing working in the lab. The Nursing Club taught students how to perform Triage and basic CPR, the Engineering Club built bridges with K’Nex and the Math Club showed students how to manipulate a JAVA program. “[The students received] a taste of programming and seeing how little changes will affect the system,” Jehring said. “[They also played] with math theory, Fibonacci numbers and sequences to [observe] patterns.” While the girls conducted experiments, parents attended lectures by mathematics professor Mary Connolly, Director of Admissions Kristin McAndrew and financial aid counselor Lonnie Kizer. The lectures featured information about college affordability, classes women should take in high school to prepare them for college and why a life in science or math is a good option, Jehring said. The day concluded with closing remarks from College President Carol Ann Mooney. Despite the number of hands-on activities offered by the event, Jehring said the most exciting aspect of the event was the participation. “[The seventh graders] get involved, and they’re actively doing things in these sessions,” she said.last_img read more

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The Landing’s Julia Murney Looks Back on Star Turns in Wicked, The Wild Party & More

first_img Role That Was the Most Satisfying “I was as grateful as I could possibly be to have been cast in Falling [2012, as Tami; Best Actress Drama Desk Award nomination]. It was about a family with two children, one of them a huge, severely autistic 18-year-old whose outbursts sometimes become violent. In real life, the parents of these kids are amazing people, and the play didn’t offer any conclusions or solutions; it’s simply a day in their life. It was very intense, and people would ask me, ‘How do you do that eight times a week?’ My answer became, “I only have to do it for 80 minutes; our author [Deanna Jent] has done it for 18 years with her own son.’ The most meaningful part was when parents [in the audience] would come up to me afterward and say, ‘You just showed me my life.’” Role That Was the Most Challenging “It’s an honor to be part of what I call the “green girl sisterhood” in Wicked [2006 on tour; 2007 on Broadway]. Elphaba is the Mick Jagger of the show, and the role is insanely satisfying. It was also the most difficult thing I’ve ever done; I was very intimidated by it vocally, and it was a test to my mental well being, in terms of stamina. I saw Idina [Menzel] on opening night, which was seared in my brain, and I also saw Shoshana [Bean] and Eden Espinosa—their voices are extraordinary and so not what I can do, so I approached it from the character point of view. I saw Elphaba as a misunderstood girl who becomes a strong woman and finds a way to harness her powers. My Glinda was Kendra Kassebaum, and I love the impact the show can have when it’s played by two women who are a little older. I had discovered the novel 10 years earlier and really loved it, so to get to express Gregory Maguire’s ideas through Winnie Holtzman’s words and Stephen Schwartz’s music was very special.” Role I Wish I Could Have Done Longer “The Wild Party [2000, as Queenie] was such an odd situation, since two versions of the same story were done simultaneously. [Murney starred in an off-Broadway production with a score by Andrew Lippa; Toni Collette played Queenie in a Broadway production with a score by Michael John LaChiusa.] We got a lot of nice reviews, but one very powerful newspaper did not care for us—nor did they care for the other one! I worked on the show for four years, and to me, Queenie was a lost soul who got caught in the habit of this [destructive] man [Burrs, played by Brian d’Arcy James]. It was a difficult show because there was nobody redeeming in it: Queenie was the one you rooted for, but even she was a hot mess! I learned so much from The Wild Party, not the least that when everyone says, ‘This show is going to change your life,’ unforeseen things can come up. Sometimes you don’t move to Broadway. But I never saw The Wild Party as a failure. I am so proud of the show.” The Landing View Comments Show Closed This production ended its run on Nov. 24, 2013 Julia Murney is beloved among fans and fellow Broadway stars for all the right reasons: She has a gorgeous, unique voice, and she’s real—sympathetic and believable onstage and warmly supportive of her colleagues offstage. Best known as one of the earliest Elphabas in Wicked, Murney works steadily in regional theaters and off-Broadway, including an acclaimed dramatic performance last season as the mother of an autistic son in Falling. She’s currently juggling three roles in the Vineyard Theatre’s premiere of The Landing, a trio of one-act musicals by John Kander and Greg Pierce. For her Role Call, the actress chose a mix of NYC shows and out-of-town favorites. Role That Was the Most Perfectly Written “Oh my gosh, the Baker’s Wife in Into the Woods [1997, Pioneer Theatre Company in Salt Lake City] is perfect. Her scenes and her score are so beautifully written. You get to make everybody cry, then you get to die and you don’t have to learn ‘Your Fault,’ which is the hardest song. It’s golden! If you’re a theater nerd like I am, some issue will come up in your life and you’ll think of a Sondheim lyric. For me, Sondheim is the musical equivalent of Thornton Wilder’s Our Town: If you’ve lived a bit and lost some people, his lyrics are metaphors for your life. Especially Into the Woods—you can think of any lyric and say, ‘I know what that means.’” Related Shows Role I Would Love to Do Again “Ragtime [2004, as Mother; North Carolina Theatre] is another one of those perfect musicals. If I was forced to do one sequence on a loop for the rest of my days, it would be the whole ‘Our Children’ sequence between Mother and Tateh. It’s the prettiest pas de deux; you hear Terrence McNally’s words plainly, and then the underscoring comes back in. So much craft went into that, and to get to fall in love with Michael Rupert [as Tateh]? It felt so easy, in the most delicious way. Mother isn’t a character you start out sympathizing with. She’s someone you look at and think, ‘You’re going to have to grow up and see a larger world,’ and I found that very interesting to explore. It’s a show I would like to do again.” Role That Sparked a Fantastic Friendship “Before The Landing, which I’m doing now, I was in the Kander and Ebb concert revue First You Dream at Signature Theatre in Virginia [2009]. That’s where I got to know John Kander, a gift I would wish for everyone because he is a tremendous man. I went in thinking, ‘Oh this will be fun, I know this music,’ and then I discovered how astounding Fred Ebb’s lyrics are. The challenge and satisfaction of singing ‘Colored Lights’ every night blew my mind. Heidi Blickenstaff and I had an amazing duet of ‘The Money Tree’ and ‘Maybe This Time.’ The show moved to the Kennedy Center unexpectedly during the workshop of The Landing, and John Kander called me and said, ‘I will understand whatever you decide, but my pitch is for you to do The Landing because I wrote it for you.’ I never knew to dream of a moment like that!”last_img read more

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Vermont Teddy Bear loaded for Valentine’s Day

first_imgVermont Teddy Bear Co,Vermont Teddy Bear, the nation’s largest producer of handcrafted teddy bears, announces the launch of its limited-edition “Fifty Shades of Grey Bear.” Approved by bestselling author EL James, the adult gift is designed for fans enthralled with the “Fifty Shades of Grey” book and left biting their lips in anticipation for the movie. “I’ll just say it. We’re obsessed with Grey,” says Bill Shouldice, CEO, Vermont Teddy Bear. “Our entire team is thrilled to announce the Fifty Shades of Grey Bear – not only to the millions of fans excited to see Fifty Shades on the big screen, but for anyone who really wants to impress their Valentine this year. It’s sure to be one of our most popular Valentine’s Day Bears.”Like the seductive male protagonist, Christian Grey, the limited-edition Fifty Shades of Grey Bear wears a gray silk suit and tie and has smoldering eyes. He even comes with a mask and mini handcuffs. No contract required.Available exclusively at VermontTeddyBear.com, the Fifty Shades of Grey Bear retails for $89.99. Handcrafted in Vermont and guaranteed for life, he can be ordered online at VermontTeddyBear.com.Source: January 28, 2015 SHELBURNE, Vt.–(BUSINESS WIRE(link is external))–Vermont Teddy Bear. Vermonter John Sortino dreamt up Vermont Teddy Bear in 1981. Inspired to bring the American tradition back to its roots, he started handcrafting Bears and selling them to family friends. By 1983, Sortino was selling at an open-air market in Burlington, Vermont. Some 30 years and 5-million Bears later, Vermont Teddy Bear continues to fulfill Sortino’s legacy. In fact, it’s the only manufacturer that handcrafts all of its 15-inch Bears in Vermont, USA – using the silkiest fur it can get its paws on and faux-suede paw pads. All Bears, BIG and small are filled with 100% recycled stuffing and guaranteed for life. Orders can be placed at VermontTeddyBear.com, by calling 1.800.828.BEAR (2327) or via mail-order catalog.last_img read more

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Smith: A yuuuuuuge miscalculation

first_imgby Mike Smith Governor Peter Shumlin and US Senator Patrick Leahy (D-Vermont) — two experienced Vermont politicians supporting Hillary Clinton — are probably wondering if they made the right political calculation. No doubt they figured that Senator Bernie Sanders would have peaked by now and that most Democrats would be gravitating to Clinton as their nominee to be our next president. By backing Clinton, they must have expected that supporters of Sanders would be initially angry over their endorsements but because the Sanders’ candidacy didn’t amount to much they would ultimately get over it and all would be forgiven. In essence, no harm, no foul. But things have not gone according to plan for so-called “establishment Democrats” and Bernie Sanders has far exceeded expectations. He virtually tied Clinton in Iowa and then went on to shellac her in New Hampshire, winning by almost 22 percentage points. Home court advantage? Perhaps. But national polls show Sanders gaining on Clinton across the country. There was a time, not too long ago, when Clinton held substantial leads in the polls in New Hampshire, Iowa and nationally. At that time, it was a safe bet to support Clinton — that’s why so many high-powered Vermont Democrats jumped on her bandwagon. And although Clinton is viewed as still having the advantage, it is no longer a certainty that she’ll beat Sanders. In fact, Vice President Joe Biden is rumored to be keeping his options open. Clinton’s recent setbacks are the result of strategic blunders by her campaign as well as the perception of the candidate herself.The Clinton campaign has struggled for a strategy that can counter Sanders’ populist message that the political and economic systems are rigged. The clear implication is that politicians such as Clinton are part of the problem, not a solution. Sanders has been hammering away at the fact that Clinton is beholden to the Wall Street firms that paid her lucrative speaking fees; and she also accepted millions in campaign contributions from them. She has yet to effectively counter this connection to the nation’s wealthiest one percent. Instead, she has concocted ineffective tactics to try to slow Sanders’ momentum. For example, attempting to move left of Sanders, as if this were possible (Note to the Clinton campaign: You can’t out-flank a lifelong socialist on the left — especially when you have been part of the corporate and political establishment for years.) This tactic will never work because it fails the credibility test. And recently, Madeleine Albright and other Clinton surrogates attacked women that were not supporting Clinton. This tactic backfired when women appeared to show their political independence by supporting the candidate who best represented their values regardless of gender. Clinton was handed an embarrassing nine-point defeat among Granite State women. By far, the No. 1 issue among Democrats in New Hampshire was the issue of trust. Clinton has a problem establishing herself as the candidate who can be trusted. This trust issue is a problem for the Clinton camp, because it goes beyond the policy differences she has with Sanders, or even the Republicans. Trust with the voters is essential to winning elections. As the primary season wears on if she can’t overcome this trust factor in other states then her campaign will be truly in trouble. Luckily for Clinton, the campaign now goes to South Carolina and Nevada. Recent polls (that do not take into account Bernie’s successes) indicate she’s maintaining a sizable lead in both states. But Clinton needs a clear victory to bolster her campaign and slow Bernie’s momentum.If Sanders continues to exceed expectations — and he doesn’t necessarily have to win in South Carolina and Nevada in order to do that — he will maintain his momentum going into future primaries especially those important primaries on Super Tuesday. The calculation that Sanders would disappear from the national political scene in quick order proved false. Chances are, he will continue his presidential bid longer than many expected, perhaps all the way to the convention. But one thing is for certain:Vermont’s Democratic hierarchy underestimated Bernie Sanders. And as Bernie might say: “It was a “yuuuge” miscalculation.”Mike Smith was the secretary of administration and secretary of human services under former Governor James Douglas. He’s a regular contributor to Vermont Business Magazine.last_img read more

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McClaughry: Reviving grassroots democracy

first_imgby John McClaughry Alert viewers of WCAX may have noticed a March 4 segment calling attention to my completion of fifty years’ service as Kirby Town Moderator. Please allow me to use those four minutes of media fame as a springboard for defending the merits of Vermont’s tradition of town meeting government. Early settlers from Massachusetts and Connecticut brought town meeting to the New Hampshire Grants before they created the Republic of Vermont in 1777. Unlike in most of the rest of the country, in Vermont – never a royal colony – the towns came together and created the state.Both Federalist John Adams and Democratic-Republican Thomas Jefferson believed that Town Meeting ought to be the foundation of any democratic republic.  When asked the reason for the political strength of New England, Adams replied “town, school, congregation, and militia”, the institutions of civil society at the local level.Jefferson, who as a Virginian had little knowledge of the workings of grassroots democracy, nonetheless identified it as essential to liberty and self government. In 1816 he wrote “where every man  is a sharer in the direction of his ward-republic [town], or of some of the higher ones, and feels that he is a participant in the government of affairs, not merely at election one day in the year, but every day; when there shall not be a man in the state who will not be a member of some one of its councils, great or small, he will let his heart be torn out of his body sooner than his power be wrested from him by a Caesar or a Bonaparte.”For decades Adams’ practical analysis and Jefferson’s shining vision elevated the status of town meeting democracy. But by the turn of the 20th century its luster had begun to fade.  A major cause was the leakage of small town people to the larger towns and cities. Another was the appearance of public concerns that could not easily be dealt with by a thousand citizens in a forty square mile “republic”.Frank Bryan, of Newbury, capped his long career as UVM professor of political science by publishing his monumental work, Real Democracy in 2004. In it he recounts how the centralist thinkers of the Progressive Era scorned grassroots democracy of all sorts. What did those yokels know? Public decisions should be turned over to the wise, educated, and public spirited, whose far seeing leadership would make government at all levels more efficient in carrying out ever more activities determined by the best and the brightest to be for the good of the people.The result of this advanced thinking was the relentless movement toward consolidation. The Progressives’ only grudging concession to democracy was allowing the erstwhile citizens to vote every year or so on whether the experts had performed acceptably.In Vermont In the 1960s, a new generation of Progressives, exemplified by Gov. Philip Hoff (1963-68), ended equal town representation in the House, removed welfare (‘poor relief”) from the towns to Waterbury, imposed state land use controls, and set in motion a burgeoning state education bureaucracy that has worked ceaselessly for consolidation of public schools into large unified districts (finally triumphant in Act 46.)This is not to say that all this centralization was abhorrent. But in “concentrating all cares into one body”, as Jefferson put it, we are steadily reducing the scope of local civic responsibility. Before long the Australian ballot will reduce town meeting democracy to a remnant, surviving small town public schools will be managed – and many closed – by distant unified districts organized like waste management districts, and town duties will shrink down to maintaining town roads, keeping up the cemetery, and issuing zoning permits and dog licenses.Whether or not this will result in a gain for society is debatable, but there can be no doubt but that the arena of citizenship will shrink, and the thousand year spirit of town meeting democracy will become a matter only for curious historians.For 49 years since my first election as Moderator, I have penned a few thoughts on the inside cover of the Kirby town report. Many of those have been tributes to or eulogies of my fellow citizens, but one in particular, from the 1971 report, has long been my favorite.After offering the Jefferson quote cited above, I wrote “Our job must be to strengthen and preserve town government, thus keeping as many of the functions of government as possible close to the people themselves. This can be a nuisance at times, and it is easy to become frustrated and want to give it all up. But we should keep in mind that town government, like life itself, is one of the things that, once given up, we will never be able to recover.”Those who believe in the importance of a vibrant community-based democracy of self-governing citizens, coming together to make public decisions about their future, need to create new forms of that venerable institution to better meet modern requirements. That is the theme of Bryan and McClaughry, The Vermont Papers: Recreating Democracy on a Human Scale (1989), available at your local library or online at abebooks.com(link is external).John McClaughry is vice president of the Ethan Allen Institute (www.ethanallen.org(link is external)).last_img read more

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Northeast Johnson County morning roundup

first_imgScreengrab of KCTV interview with John Douglass.Shawnee Mission Director of Safety and Security says gun control won’t stop terrorism. John Douglass, the former Overland Park Police Chief and current Director of Safety and Security for the Shawnee Mission School District, told KCTV on Sunday that he didn’t believe tougher gun control laws would be effective in stopping terrorism. [Local expert-fight against terrorism shouldn’t include gun control debate — KCTV]SM North, Miege basketball named teams to watch. The Kansas City Star’s boys basketball preview named both SM North and Bishop Miege as among five teams to watch on the Kansas side. SM North was at the top of the list, noting the play of Marcus and Michael Weathers who return as seniors this year. The team opened the season with a 71-47 win over Blue Valley Southwest. SM East senior Jay Guastello was listed at the top of five players to watch this season.Lancer football players receive postseason recognition. Five SM East football players were among those honored on this year’s 6A All State teams. Senior tackle Jeff Heath made the 1st Team squad while Sky Tate, Stephen Gill, Wyatt Edmisten and Simon Bradley made the Honorable Mention list.Rose column says Johnson County could be TIF winner. Writing for The Kansas City Star, Johnson County columnist Steve Rose says the battle over a Tax Increment Financing project in downtown KCMO could benefit Johnson County. If TIF development is discouraged in the city, Rose contends, then developers shoudl look across the state line where county chair Ed Eilert says renovation of old property or redevelopment of failing retail or office centers is a legitimate use of TIF. [Steve Rose: Johnson County could be the winner of Kansas City’s TIF wars – The Kansas City Star]Westwood to have final leaf pick up Thursday. Westwood residents can take advantage of the city’s final leaf pick up of the year this Thursday, Dec. 10. Residents who wish to have their leaves sucked up by Roeland Park’s trucks are asked to pile their leaves in the streets one foot away from the curb. The exception is along Mission Road, 47th Street, Rainbow Blvd, and State Line Road, where the trucks will not be making a final pass.Northeast Johnson County morning roundup is brought to you by Twisted Sisters Coffee Shop on Johnson Drive. For updates on the latest blends and specialty drinks available, follow them on Facebook.last_img read more

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With office tenant now likely part of the mix, Mission to set new public finance hearing on Gateway project for August

first_imgThe Gateway property continues to sit vacant.The potential addition of a $30 million office facility as part of the long-stalled Gateway project in Mission has forced the city to push back the public hearing date for associated community improvement district and tax increment financing plans.City Administrator Laura Smith told the city council at its meeting last week that representatives of the Cameron Group communicated to the city earlier this month that they believed they had an office tenant ready to sign on to the development.“They are actively working with an office tenant,” Smith said. “So they have increased the scope of their project and the project budget at this point by $30 million to include the office tenant…We think that’s a positive improvement to the project.”With the addition of an office tenant, however, the financials of the project would be significantly different enough from what the city had already approved that Smith recommended the city consider a slightly amended TIF agreement. That agreement was approved at a very short meeting of the city’s planning commission on Monday. On Wednesday, the city will have a special council meeting at which it will set a public hearing date for the amended TIF agreement as well as for a new community improvement district application.Cameron has indicated to the city that it wants to replace the existing two CIDs approved back when Walmart was a centerpiece of the project with a single CID that would charge the same sales tax rate across the entire district. (Under the previously approved CIDs, the Walmart would have charged a lower sales tax rate than the rest of the businesses on the site).The new public hearings for the TIF and CID will be in August.Cameron told the city last year that it hoped to break ground on a portion of the project that would not use public financing in spring of this year. To date, the city has not received any permit applications for that work to begin.last_img read more

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Shawnee Mission updates requirements for volunteers, with fingerprinting, background checks needed every 3 years

first_imgThe district has taken steps to clarify the volunteer roles that will require MVP approval starting this summer and beyond.The Shawnee Mission School District has updated its policies for volunteering, and will require that anyone who wants to work with students in the district go through a fingerprinting/background check every three years.To be eligible to volunteer through the district’s My Volunteer Pal (MVP) program, people must complete an online MVP application, attend a training session, and submit fingerprints for a background check.The district has also taken steps to specify who does and does not need to go through the MVP application and approval process.“We’re striving to improve consistency in policies so that there will not be confusion about who should, or should not be an MVP volunteer (someone with a background check through fingerprints),” wrote Shawna Samuel, the district’s director of communication. “Basically, any volunteer who has contact with our students, without supervision by an administrator, teacher or someone in authority at the school, will need to become a MVP.”Volunteer roles that will require MVP approval include:Chaperones for district approved field tripsChat ‘n ChewChess ClubLunch buddiesMad ScienceMaster GardenersMentorsIn-school volunteers (art room, library, etc…)TutorsWatch DogsPeople who volunteer “in a one-time, group supervised setting, or non-student contact capacity” — a classroom party volunteer, for example — would not need to get MVP approval.Training sessions require a reservation and are limited to 12 participants. The first training session of the summer is scheduled for tonight, with additional sessions June 19 and August 7, 14 and 21.The district offers drop-in screening for fingerprints on Wednesdays from 9:30 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. and from 12:45 to 4 p.m. Volunteers must attend a training session before they can have their fingerprints screened.All volunteers must submit to a fingerprint rescreening and background check every three years to remain eligible.last_img read more

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Gophers ready to come home to Siebert

first_imgGophers ready to come home to SiebertMinnesota will play its first home game of the season on Wednesday.Daily File Photo; Patty GroverGophers outfielder Dan Motl leads off the base on April 13, 2014, at Siebert Field. Ben GotzMarch 25, 2015Jump to CommentsShare on FacebookShare on TwitterShare via EmailPrintWhen the Gophers officially moved to their new outdoor stadium — Siebert Field — in 2013, they had to make a few sacrifices.One of them was giving up any chance of home games until late March.For the second consecutive year, the Gophers opened their schedule with 20 road games, traveling up and down the country to play teams while waiting for Minnesota weather to warm up.All that traveling can wear on a team.“I think everyone is sick and tired of being on the road,” head coach John Anderson said. “It gets old, definitely. No question about it.”For the first six weeks of the season, the Gophers schedule has been largely the same — arrive home late Sunday night or early Monday morning, then hit the road again Thursday. Earlier in March, the Gophers took off again in the middle of the week for a Wednesday exhibition game in Florida against the Minnesota Twins.“It’s tough the first couple of weeks, but you get into a routine, you get the hang of it and it’s really fun to see all of these ballparks,” junior outfielder Dan Motl said.Recently, the Gophers road schedule has had plenty of complications as well. Their first game against Creighton was moved back a day, and one game in the series had to be canceled. Over spring break, the Gophers saw more complications in Virginia, staying until Monday to finish their last game of a tournament. And last week against Maryland, their games were moved back a day, with an early doubleheader taking place on Saturday.Their first home game, which was supposed to be Tuesday, was pushed to Wednesday.“Especially over spring break, there’s been a lot of game changes,” senior third baseman Tony Skjefte said. “We’ve played a lot of morning games, 10 a.m. games, doubleheaders. Stuff’s been moved around on us. I think it has been a little bit of a grind, and I think once we get home, rest up a little bit, I think we’ll really play really well coming out.”The Gophers haven’t been able to get many practices in during the week because of their schedule, Anderson said, and on the road, weather has sometimes prevented the team from even warming up on the field outdoors before games.“We’ve been hitting in the cages a lot. We want to be on the field,” Anderson said. “That’s critical for us, especially when we practice indoors all the time. [We] didn’t get a lot of work on the field this week because of conditions, and that’s been a factor, no question about it, I think, just in terms of our ability to improve and sharpen our fundamental play.”If the weather warms up enough to allow the Gophers to play their home opener on Wednesday, the team could start to get the outdoor practice its coach is looking for. The team will be able to settle down at home for a while, too, as 18 of the team’s next 24 games are scheduled at home.“It’s going to be nice to not have to get on a plane every weekend,” Motl said. “We’re just excited to get back out there. Hopefully the weather stays warm and we can go out and get some wins.”last_img read more

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