Why in-house lawyers face an ethical minefield

first_img More From Our Partners Brave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgFort Bragg soldier accused of killing another servicewoman over exthegrio.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgColin Kaepernick to publish book on abolishing the policethegrio.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgFans call out hypocrisy as Tebow returns to NFL while Kaepernick is still outthegrio.comKansas coach fired for using N-word toward Black playerthegrio.comPorsha Williams engaged to ex-husband of ‘RHOA’ co-star Falynn Guobadiathegrio.comKiller drone ‘hunted down a human target’ without being told tonypost.comLA news reporter doesn’t seem to recognize actor Mark Currythegrio.comInside Ashton Kutcher and Mila Kunis’ not-so-average farmhouse estatenypost.comInstitutional Investors Turn To Options to Bet Against AMCvaluewalk.comWhy people are finding dryer sheets in their mailboxesnypost.comMan on bail for murder arrested after pet tiger escapes Houston homethegrio.comI blew off Adam Sandler 22 years ago — and it’s my biggest regretnypost.comFlorida woman allegedly crashes children’s birthday party, rapes teennypost.com Share whatsapp Show Comments ▼ Rising regulation, higher standards of compliance, and the increased threat of litigation are making the role of in-house lawyers more important, but many are being confronted by a ethical minefield, a new report has found.They have to balance the demands of their primary role, such as upholding the rule of law, with being a commercial team player for the business – which is creating significant ethical challenges, the report, by University College London (UCL) and Birmingham University, said.  Appetite for legal risk involves accepting, even welcoming, tolerance for conduct which may be, even may be likely to be, unlawful.This is sometimes in tension with the professional obligation to promote the rule of law and the guidance to solicitors that they must treat the public interest in the administration of justice as definitive of conflicts between professional obligations.Such tensions also impact on corporate interests: there are relatively recent, serious conduct risk examples of allegations involving lawyers in and/or instructed by Standard Chartered Bank, the News of the World, Barclays, The Times newspaper, BNP Paribas and General Motors.Teams of in-house staff lawyers are typically headed by a general counsel and work in a particular company. This is different from private law firms, where lawyers work in departments focused on a specific area of law, generally outside of and for a range of companies.”Growing evidence [including] our research and some anecdotal commentary suggests that the role of general counsel is under increasing pressure,” Professor Richard Moorhead, director of UCL’s centre for ethics and law and one of the report’s authors, said. “Their professional and ethical boundaries are not as well drawn as may be necessary for the increasingly sophisticated world of in-house work.””What is also clear is that the more-for-less challenge, and the need to be commercial and influential within a business context can pose significant ethical challenges for in-house lawyers. They and their businesses are not always well prepared for such challenges,” Birmingham University’s Dr Steven Vaughan, Moorhead’s co-author, added. by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeMoneyPailShe Was A Star, Now She Works In ScottsdaleMoneyPailzenherald.comMeghan Markle Changed This Major Detail On Archies Birth Certificatezenherald.comMaternity WeekA Letter From The Devil Written By A Possessed Nun In 1676 Has Been TranslatedMaternity WeekComedyAbandoned Submarines Floating Around the WorldComedyGameday NewsNBA Wife Turns Heads Wherever She GoesGameday NewsEquity MirrorThey Drained Niagara Falls — They Weren’t Prepared For This Sickening DiscoveryEquity MirrorNoteableyKirstie Alley Is So Skinny Now And Looks Like A BarbieNoteableyBridesBlushThis Is Why The Royal Family Kept Quiet About Prince Harry’s Sister BridesBlushBeach RaiderMom Belly Keeps Growing, Doctor Sees Scan And Calls CopsBeach Raider Why in-house lawyers face an ethical minefield center_img Tuesday 7 April 2015 10:11 am Jessica Morris whatsapp Tags: NULLlast_img read more

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In Pictures: Laois artist and teacher hosting local exhibition

first_img In Pictures: Laois artist and teacher hosting local exhibition Home Lifestyle In Pictures: Laois artist and teacher hosting local exhibition LifestyleOut and About By Siun Lennon – 11th December 2018 Pinterest Facebook Previous articleCCTV blockage for communities raised with Minister for Justice in the DáilNext articleGardaí warn of rental scam doing the rounds to trick people out of money Siun Lennonhttp://heresosiun.blogspot.ie/2016/09/the-lekkie-piccie-experience.htmlSiún Lennon joined LaoisToday in a full-time capacity after studying Journalism and New Media in the University of Limerick. She hails from Rosenallis and her interests vary from news, sports and politics. WhatsApp A Laois artist and teacher has an exciting solo exhibition in Abbeyleix and works in an open call exhibition in the Dunamaise Arts Centre.Mountmellick woman Ruth Williams has created the paintwork exhibition in Abbeyleix library which runs for the month of December into early January.Her work is an accumulation of pieces created over her four years spent in Limerick School of Art and Design.Ruth, who now teaches in St Mary’s CBS Portlaoise, spoke about her pieces and the meaning behind them.“Our urban lives have almost created a sensory curtailment that has distanced us from the natural world.Nonetheless, woodlands and national parks have always been a common place that I find myself encountering everywhere I travel.“Using the tree as a motif in my paintings, I wish to provoke an emotional connection from my audience. I wish for the viewer to be pulled back down to the soil.Ruth spoke about the importance playing outdoors had on her childhood.“For me the image of the woodland awakens an inevitable fascination inside and revisits memories of my childhood summers.”“Exploring the ruins of an old house in nearby Garryhinch Woods, attempting to climb the trees, picking wild flowers, and envisioning the magical creatures that lived there. This firm connection to all things nature is the origin of my artwork.”Ruth added that it is important to her that her art is colourful and enjoyable, as there is, ‘a lot of gloomy art in today’s world’.“For me the colours symbolize an origin of life. I intentionally give the trees and surrounding woodland a subtle anthropomorphic quality that gives it a somewhat compelling presence, almost forgetting the realm of man.“There is a lot of gloomy art in today’s world and in my opinion my work has a certain type of ambiance within it that creates a sense of joy. Fundamentally there is a spiritual dimension to the work as the trees come to life through the eyes of our inner child.”​Inspired by the work of Peter Doig whose landscape paintings hold an otherworldly atmosphere, Ruth’s work is a familiarity  seductive beauty and dreamy melancholy.Ruth’s paintings are available to buy for different title prices and on display in Abbeyleix library until January. Twitter Laois secondary school announces scholarship winners for new academic year SEE ALSO – WATCH: Little Laois girl makes plea for funds for the organisation that saved her life RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHORcenter_img Community WhatsApp Pinterest TAGSAbbeyleix Library Charlie Flanagan on Electric Picnic: ‘I’d ask organisers to consult with community leaders’ Facebook Council New Arles road opens but disquiet over who was invited to official opening Community Twitterlast_img read more

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HIV/AIDS Treatment Programme gets $417.7 Million

first_imgRelatedHIV/AIDS Treatment Programme gets $417.7 Million RelatedHIV/AIDS Treatment Programme gets $417.7 Million HIV/AIDS Treatment Programme gets $417.7 Million UncategorizedApril 4, 2007 RelatedHIV/AIDS Treatment Programme gets $417.7 Millioncenter_img Advertisements FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail A sum of $417.7 million has been earmarked in the 2007/08 Estimates of Expenditure for the HIV/AIDS Treatment, Prevention and Control Programme in the Ministry of Health.Funded through a grant from the Global AIDS Fund, the programme seeks to strengthen the multi-sector national response to prevent and address the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Jamaica.This will be achieved by beefing up efforts to provide antiretroviral drugs to children and adults living with HIV and AIDS, and promoting safer sex practices, including abstinence, especially among vulnerable groups.The programme also seeks to complete and implement policies and put a legislative framework in place to address stigma and discrimination against people living with HIV/AIDS, and vulnerable high-risk groups.So far, the programme boasts a number of achievements since its inception in 2004. A total of 98,505 blood samples have been tested for HIV, thereby meeting 98 per cent of the 100,000 target for blood samples tested, while 1,919 adults and 161 children have been put on antiretroviral treatment and have received counselling.Approximately 59,383 young people have been exposed to Health and Family Life Education interventions and 1,714 youth peer counsellors trained by sub-recipients, surpassing the target of 30.Additionally, some 68,225 condoms and 16,984 lubricants have been distributed island wide as part of prevention activities, while 2,830 non-traditional condom outlets have been established. Draft policies to address HIV/AIDS were developed for 50 private sector companies, 11 line ministries, and 149 schools. For this year, the programme expects to test 62,100 more persons for HIV and put 2,000 individuals on anti retroviral drugs, in addition to distributing 10,000 condoms and lubricants.Also for the period, some 1,700 people living with HIV/AIDS will receive adherence counseling, and 12 treatment centres will be equipped with counsellors.There are also plans to adopt the National Policy on HIV/AIDS and also take its message to the population through advertising campaigns.last_img read more

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Benefits of Co-Production Treaty Promoted in UK

first_imgFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail The benefits of the Co-production Treaty with the United Kingdom (UK), were actively promoted this week by Jamaica Trade and Invest, formerly JAMPRO.Led by Trade Commissioner, Del Crooks, a Jamaica Trade and Invest team participated in the Broadcast Live Showcase in London, which is a premier business conference and exhibition for professionals working in all areas of video content, creation, management and delivery.The Co-production Treaty, which will facilitate film production in Jamaica and the United Kingdom, was signed in April by Prime Minister Portia Simpson Miller.During the three-day event, the team hosted a news conference to highlight the Treaty. The UK Minister of Film, Shaun Woodward, welcomed the Treaty and said he hoped it would see the beginning of much more collaboration between Jamaica and the UK, as there were many stories to be told. Clair Wise of the UK Film Council, who also spoke at the news conference, said she hoped the Treaty would be ratified in the near future. The conference was also addressed by Jamaica’s Deputy High Commissioner to the UK, Sharon Saunders.The Treaty, which is the first such agreement between the UK and any Caribbean country, includes provision that could boost direct and indirect employment within the industry. Jamaican and UK film makers could also enjoy similar incentives, including duty concessions.Jamaica will also have access to the other countries that previously signed similar Treaties with the UK. The Co-production Treaty is in keeping with the Government’s development strategy for the local film industry that provides new incentives for using local film production services.According to Jamaica Trade and Invest, the local film industry earned an estimated $1.2 billion during the last financial year and provided employment for more than 3,000 people. RelatedBenefits of Co-Production Treaty Promoted in UK RelatedBenefits of Co-Production Treaty Promoted in UK Benefits of Co-Production Treaty Promoted in UK UncategorizedJune 22, 2007center_img RelatedBenefits of Co-Production Treaty Promoted in UK Advertisementslast_img read more

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GPS Navigation System to Make Travel Easier

first_imgGPS Navigation System to Make Travel Easier TransportMarch 20, 2009 FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail Lost on the road and unsure of the correct route to take? With the launch of Jamaica’s first Global Positioning Satellite (GPS) navigation system, getting lost while driving can become a thing of the past.By just plotting in the destination, the digital road map, which was developed by the Mona Geo-informatics Institute (MGI), will recommend the route to be followed, giving turn-by-turn directions from a starting point to the final stop.In an interview with JIS News, Director of the MGI, Dr. Parris Lyew-Ayee Jr., says that the device, which is installed in the car, is user-friendly and is “for anyone who can get lost.”“Housewives can use it…expatriates and diplomats, tourists, taxi men and auto dealers,” he adds.The system features 10,000 Jamaican roadways and 69 categories, including police stations, attractions, banks, post offices, gas stations, restaurants, dentist offices, cemeteries, and churches.In highlighting the safety aspects of the device, Dr. Lyew-Ayee notes that “we have pre-programmed the system to avoid crime hot spots.”“Let us say you are in Kingston and want to reach Ocho Rios…while going through Spanish Town would be shortest route.the system would give the Spanish Town bypass as the option.”He informs that the device can give directions in various languages, which include Chinese, French and Portuguese and the Jamaican accent will soon be added.According to the MGI Director, the multi-million dollar project took two and a half years to be developed and was funded from money generated “by doing work outside. We then reinvested it into the research and development of this project.”He says that one of the main intentions of the product is to take geography to the mainstream, “this is something that people, who proudly boast that they cannot read a map, they can now play with technological devices and this is where we can (merge) technology and maps,” he says.He notes that the technology can be used “in many other non navigation purposes, including enhanced tracking systems, (and) property identification.”Deputy Director at MGI, Alva Maxam, notes that the main challenge in introducing the technology was that “most of the roads were not named and for those roads that were numbered, the numbers were not sequential…and the numbers for some of the lots were fractions. That kind of numbering system could not work on a system like this. What we decided to do was have you navigate to the road itself.”“You can actually type in the name of the road on the system and it will navigate it to the road,” she explains.In terms of cost, she says that the starting price is $11,500, to install the data on the unit, and the units vary in cost from US$150 to about US$1,200.“So, what you will do is buy the unit and then we put the data on it at the additional cost. You can order a unit through us in which case you are looking at about $35,000 for the package,” she adds.Minister of Agriculture, Dr. Christopher Tufton, who was at the launch, endorsed the technology, noting that it is actually being used in the Ministry.“We just completed a mapping of banana plantations throughout the country and it is something that we would like to do more of. It helps us in terms of tracking farming activities whether in cattle or in crop production,” he informs.“It can help us in praedial larceny, (and) in terms of disaster assessment, so it is important to use it in agriculture as well as in other areas,” Dr. Tufton says.Dr. Tufton further informs that time will be spent in exploring the device to determine how its usage can be increased within the sector.First year student, at the University of Technology (UTech), Tarique McFarlane, notes that the navigation system will help a lot of individuals, not only Jamaicans but also tourists as they will have easier access to information in finding their destination.“Especially for me, I am a university student and I really do not know Kingston as I am from the rural area, so it will assist me a lot in finding places,” she asserts, noting that “this is a good thing for Jamaica.”In the meantime, Dr. Lyew-Ayee urges users to use the device responsibly and safely. “Nobody is telling you to keep staring at the GPS and not look ahead of you when you are driving, nobody is telling you to slavishly follow the commands that this thing is going to be ‘barking’ at you. You are going to need to use commonsense when you are using this product,” he says. RelatedGPS Navigation System to Make Travel Easier RelatedGPS Navigation System to Make Travel Easiercenter_img Advertisements RelatedGPS Navigation System to Make Travel Easierlast_img read more

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Bystander intervention training offers skills to help a friend in need

first_imgShare Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail Categories:SafetyCampus Community Elie Sharp remembers how she rescued her brother from an awkward situation during a social event.A young girl had plopped herself into her brother’s lap unexpectedly when her brother, who was born with Asperger’s syndrome and shuns crowds and touching by strangers, whispered, “Help me.”Sharp, a competitive archer, coach and a University of Colorado Boulder freshman from Arvada, Colo., jumped into action with hawk-like precision.“Hey, I need you over here. Can you help me out?” she asked the girl, who hopped off her brother’s knee and followed Sharp. The diversion tactic helped Sharp resolve the issue without embarrassing her brother, the girl or herself.Distraction, as it turns out, can be a powerful tactic to diffuse conflict or to rescue others from awkward, embarrassing, degrading or potentially dangerous situations. Other effective tactics include confronting the situation head-on or employing a stealth approach that allows a helper to fly under the radar. All are practical tips included in an effective training for new students called “Bystander Intervention.”The training, developed by the Office of Institutional Equity and Compliance or OIEC, raises awareness about personal safety, sexual assault and other serious issues, and reminds students that people sometimes need a Good Samaritan to step up and help a friend or stranger when they are at their most vulnerable.“With stealth helping, sometimes people don’t even know they’re being helped,” said Julie S. Volckens, the OIEC’s associate director for assessment and education.Volckens and Teresa Wroe, the OIEC’s education and prevention program director, co-developed and now facilitate bystander intervention training every year for all incoming CU Boulder students. Students are required to take the training during their first semester on campus. Students who complete the mandatory program get credit by scanning their Buff OneCard at the end of the session. Those who don’t make it to the training in their first semester at CU Boulder will find themselves with a hold on their account and unable to register for the spring semester. During their training sessions, Wroe and Volckens ask students to consider various scenarios and how they would respond if they sensed a fellow student needed help, and discuss difficult topics such as sexual assault, domestic violence, public drunkenness and bullying in the process. They also ask students to suggest ways of coping with unwanted, negative behavior and provide insights from their own experience and training.In auditorium classrooms filled to capacity this past week, Wroe led multiple bystander intervention sessions, and invited participants to consider how they might respond to a difficult situation in their residence hall, at a party, in a campus building or in another location.“Who here would say, “I’m someone who would have my friend’s back?” Wroe asked participants. “Who here would step up if they saw a bad situation happening?”Wroe told the students, many of them new to the college experience, that the training would help them “up their game” with a new and practical skill set.“We want to give you some options for addressing problems when they come up,” she told more than 400 students who packed the auditorium in the Mathematics building.There are multiple motivational factors that can propel people to help a friend or a stranger in need and just as many that can make it difficult to intervene, including embarrassment, uncertainty about whether help is wanted in the first place and personal safety concerns.A social psychological phenomenon known as “the bystander effect” can occur when observers assume someone else will help, that they don’t have the necessary skills to help, or that it is not their responsibility.Simply being aware of all of these issues can help students unpack the psychology behind the all-or-nothing dilemma—the idea that if we can’t completely resolve the problem at hand, then maybe we shouldn’t get involved at all, Wroe said.Arriving on campus and adjusting to a new social environment is an exciting time for undergraduate and graduate students, but it’s also when students are most likely to run into trouble. The fall semester is when incoming students experience the most thefts, stitches, tickets and sexual assaults—which is why people need skills to interrupt these situations before they become a problem, Wroe and Volckens impress upon students during their training sessions.This past summer, OIEC released the second phase of its sexual misconduct survey findings, including the statistic that 28 percent of the 5,519 female undergraduate students who responded to the survey reported having experienced some form of sexual assault.The survey identified sexual assault as “nonconsensual sexual contact or penetration,” and listed several tactics that sexual perpetrators use to facilitate such behavior. The tactics included catching a person off guard; ignoring someone’s efforts to get the aggressor to stop; deception, manipulation and emotional threats; incapacitation through alcohol; physical threats and intimidation; and force.“Sometimes when people are in a bad situation, they may not even be able to recognize it,” Wroe told students this week. “Say what you see and just start helping.” Sharp, the archer who came to her brother’s aid, said the bystander intervention class offered “a new perspective on things you would not normally think about.” Cameron Sojak, a freshman from a military family that has lived in countries around the globe but now calls Colorado home, said the class was a good reminder to be vigilant about uncomfortable situations that can arise in some social settings.“They never teach you how to be a good person,” he said. “Some people need a reminder on how to be a decent person.” Teresa Wroe, Director of Education and Prevention and the Deputy Title IX Coordinator for the Office of Institutional Equity and Compliance, addresses students during a Bystander Intervention session.center_img Arriving on campus and adjusting to a new social environment is an exciting time for undergraduate and graduate students, but it’s also when students are most likely to run into trouble. The fall semester is when incoming students experience the most thefts, stitches, tickets and sexual assaults—which is why people need skills to interrupt these situations before they become a problem. Published: Aug. 25, 2016 last_img read more

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Music composition contest open through April 8

first_imgPublished: March 12, 2019 The University Libraries are excited to share their ongoing development of LibCast,  a new podcast sharing the stories from the Libraries. LibCast producers want a simple and upbeat music theme to tie each episode together, and would prefer the music be an original composition by a CU Boulder student.All CU Boulder students are invited to submit original written and recorded music to the LibCast Composition Contest by April 8, 2019. One selected composer will receive a $100 Visa gift card and be recognized on the podcast Podcast music helps establishes an overarching tone for a show. Sound adds punctuation to pivotal parts of an episode, supports transitions from scene-to-scene, and serves as a trademark for readers to remember and return to. Theme music for LibCast should be happy and upbeat, keeping University Libraries’ mood, atmosphere, and mission in mind. Producers are looking for music that does not draw too much attention to itself. Rather, the music could complement the podcast narrator’s voice. As Jordan Kisner put it in the Pitchfork’s article, The Secrets of Successful Podcast Music, podcast music’s function is to “create a space for the human voice, and for the silence of a voice that’s stopped speaking.” Think welcoming, scholarly, and supportive.In order for your work to be considered, compositions must fall between one and three minutes in duration. Applicants must be current CU Boulder undergraduate or graduate students. All work must be original and not copyrighted in any way. Apply Now Questions? Contact the Libraries Communications Manager, Deirdre O. Keating.Categories:Music LibraryLibCastlast_img read more

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NIPERs takes up COVID-19-related research and product development initiatives

first_imgNIPERs takes up COVID-19-related research and product development initiatives The missing informal workers in India’s vaccine story Comments (0) Related Posts Stress upon priority to licensing and commercialisation of solutions developed at NIPERs so that the products reach the market in this hour of needA large number of multi-faceted research proposals have been submitted by various National Institutes of Pharmaceutical Education and Research (NIPERs), towards the containment, identification and treatment of COVID-19 to relevant agencies for approval. The key themes of these proposals include design of protease targeting COVID-19 antiviral agents (NIPER-Mohali), computationally guided drug-repurposing using the FDA approved drug-database (NIPER-Mohali and Raebareli), analysis of pro-drug to drug conversion of Remdesivir (NIPER, Mohali), adjuvant-therapy based nasal spray for ailing patients (NIPER-Hyderabad), quantum-dot based and conductivity based biosensor development for rapid COVID-19 (NIPER-Ahmedabad) testing, and an interesting study about the control of strokes incidence during COVID-19. NIPER-Rae Bareli has also initiated a mega project with IIT and an industrial partner in the development of new immuno-booster formulation utilizing traditionally used shrubs. NIPER Kolkata is working on an indigenous cost effective ICU ventilator in collaboration with CSIR CECRI and a private manufacturer.National Institutes of Pharmaceutical Education and Research (NIPERs) are the institutes of national importance under the aegis of the Department of Pharmaceutical, Ministry of Chemicals and Fertilizers. The seven institutes are functional at Ahmedabad, Hyderabad, Hajipur, Kolkata, Guwahati, Mohali, and Raebareli.A meeting of all the directors and chairmen of the institutions through video conferencing was held under the chairmanship of Dr PD Vaghela, Secretary, Pharmaceuticals to review their performance in research and innovation activities especially with regard to the ways in which NIPERs have and can contribute in country’s fight against COVID-19 pandemic.Director, NIPER Guwahati informed about the fabrication of prototypes for 3D printed face-shields, a ‘hands-free object’ for touch-less opening of doors, drawers  and elevators, antiviral masks as well as skin friendly herbal sanitizers. He informed that industrial scale manufacturing of these products is being done in collaboration with Hindustan Antibiotics, a departmental PSU. At NIPER Mohali, in association with the Government of Punjab, steps have been initiated to set-up an RT-PCR based COVID-19 testing facility to expedite COVID-19 confirmatory tests in the state.Dr Vaghela mentioned that all COVID-19 related research and product development initiatives should be done briskly to provide help to the needy at the earliest. In particular, he stressed that all licensing and commercialisation aspects of the developed solutions at NIPERs should be coordinated through regulatory agencies on priority so that the products reach the market in this hour of need. Through these research efforts and societal participation in helping the people, NIPERs are committed to work in solidarity with different groups and serve the country in the best possible way. MaxiVision Eye Hospitals launches “Mucormycosis Early Detection Centre” Add Comment WHO tri-regional policy dialogue seeks solutions to challenges facing international mobility of health professionals Indraprastha Apollo Hospitals releases first “Comprehensive Textbook of COVID-19” By Press Information Bureau on May 15, 2020 News Phoenix Business Consulting invests in telehealth platform Healpha Share COVID-19NIPER Read Article Heartfulness group of organisations launches ‘Healthcare by Heartfulness’ COVID care app Menopause to become the next game-changer in global femtech solutions industry by 2025last_img read more

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Lewis wins ShopRite by 6; takes over No. 1

first_imgGALLOWAY TOWNSHIP, N.J. – Stacy Lewis is back on top. And this time, she’s ready to stay there for a while. Lewis won the ShopRite LPGA Classic on Sunday to take the top spot in the world ranking from Inbee Park, finishing with a 4-under 67 for a six-stroke victory. No. 1 for four weeks early last year, Lewis ended Park’s 59-week run in the top spot. ”It feels great,” Lewis said. ”I feel like I’ve played a lot of good, consistent golf over the last year and I felt like I deserve to be here. I didn’t feel like I stumbled into it.” Lewis finished at 16-under 197 on the Bay Course at Stockton Seaview Hotel and Golf Club and earned $225,000 for her second victory of the year and 10th overall. Also the 2012 winner at Seaview, she won the North Texas LPGA Shootout last month after finishing second six times in her previous 16 events since winning the Women’s British Open in August. She joins Sorenstam (1998, 2002, 2005), Juli Inkster (1986, 1988) and Betsy King (1987, 1995, 2001) as the only multiple winners in the tournament. ”That’s a pretty good list of people there,” Lewis said. ”That’s not too bad. Wow, that’s really cool.” Christina Kim was second after a 72, marking her best finish since 2010. Park closed with a 70 to tie for eighth at 7 under. She’s winless in 10 tour starts this season after sweeping the first three majors last year and finishing the season with six victories. ”It is a little bit relief not to have the big heavy crown on my head,” Park said. ”It’s not the end of the world.” Lewis finished a stroke off the tournament scoring record set by Annika Sorenstam in 1998 and 2005. The 29-year-old Texan opened with a 67 and had a 63 on Saturday to take a one-stroke lead over Kim into the final round. On Sunday, she was hardly threatened, using birdies on the third and fourth holes to open up a two-stroke lead before picking up two more consecutive birdies to open the back nine – holing a 25-foot putt on No. 10 and a 15-footer on No. 11. Despite her first bogey in 42 holes at No. 12 and then missing two short putts on No. 17 for another bogey, Lewis had built up enough of a cushion to cruise home with the largest margin of victory in the tournament’s 26-year history. ”I don’t know what it is about this place,” Lewis said. ”It’s just really special to me. I’ve played some really good golf here, and it’s just mind-boggling to think I have 10 wins.” Jennifer Johnson (72), Haeji Kang (69), Anna Nordqvist (70) and Gerina Piller (70) tied for third at 9 under. Johnson opened with a course-record 62 and followed with 70 for a spot in Sunday’s final pairing with Lewis and Kim. But the 22-year-old Californian had a double bogey and two bogeys on the back nine to fall out of contention. Kim had a run of three straight birdies on No. 9-11, but shot 3 over on the final seven holes, including a double bogey on 18. ”I hadn’t been in contention in a while so I kind of forgot what it was like having nerves,” Kim said. ”And it kind of showed on the last hole.” Lewis smiled and pumped her fist to the crowd as she walked down the fairway at 18, relishing her new place atop the world ranking. Her brief stay as No. 1 last year was a rocky one, with Lewis admitting that she had trouble dealing with the extra obligations that came with the top spot. ”With a good team of people around me,” Lewis believes she’s more prepared to handle those duties and be the face of the LPGA. ”The last time it was taken away from me in an off-week when we weren’t even playing, so I’m definitely just not going to take it for granted and really enjoy it this time. Now I know all the extra things that come along with it. But I’m ready for it this time.” Karrie Webb, last year’s champion, tied for eighth after a 67. Third-ranked Lydia Ko bounced back from a second-round 75 to shoot 69 and finish at 1 under.last_img read more

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Tiger at 40: Why Tiger Woods still matters

first_img(Editor’s note: This story originally ran on Dec. 16) THE BIGGEST DRAW IN GOLF is No. 416 in the world rankings, sandwiched between Martin Flores and Rob Oppenheim. He hasn’t won a tournament in 28 months, or a major in 90, and judging by the funereal tone of his news conference in the Bahamas, it’s safe to assume that drought won’t end anytime soon. But even as his game becomes more curiosity than cultural obsession, even as the next generation of stars dominates the way he used to, Tiger Woods has remained the focal point of the sport by almost any metric. When he moves into contention, television ratings skyrocket. When he adds a new tournament, fans turn out in record numbers. And when he lands in the news, talk shows produce breathless debate and websites post best-ever traffic reports. Sure, the Woods phenomenon is more subdued now, a byproduct of injury and ineffectiveness, and an uncertainty hovers over golf’s biggest star like never before. But the past year in particular – the worst of his legendary career – is proof that even a diminished Woods is still capable of elevating the sport in ways even the most compelling players cannot.    The Tiger Effect is alive and well as he approaches his 40th birthday – it just looks, sounds and feels different.  GOLF IS THE MOST COMPLICATED sport to cover on television. Think about it: There are as many as 70 balls in the air at one time. There are 18 separate fields spread out over hundreds of acres. There are no numbers or names on the backs of jerseys. And the play is continuous. In timed sports, such as football and basketball, a timeout allows a few moments to reassess. But golf never stops – in fact, the crew works even harder during commercials, taping shots and planning where they will send viewers after the break while also trying to catch up to live coverage and check in on the leaders. “It’s like putting a puzzle together,” said Lance Barrow, CBS’ coordinating producer for golf and the NFL. “If one of the pieces gets out of whack, it’s really hard to get back on track.” For the past two decades, the one consistent piece of that puzzle has been Woods, a larger-than-life figure whose play was so dominant that he hijacked the coverage to the point that no one else mattered. That tone was set early. The first tournament after Barrow assumed the reins of CBS’ golf coverage was the 1997 Masters, one of the most transformative events in the sport’s history. That Sunday, CBS came on the air early, as Woods and Costantino Rocca were hitting their approach shots into the fifth hole. In the production meeting that morning, Barrow had instructed his charges to show every one of Woods’ shots live and to walk with him as he crossed all of Augusta National’s historic landmarks: the short climb from the ninth green to the 10th tee, the uneasy walk from the 11th green to the 12th tee, the marches across the Hogan, Nelson and Sarazen bridges, and the reflective strolls down 16 and up 18. Tiger at 40 Dec. 16: Who is Tiger Woods? Dec. 16: Why Tiger still matters Dec. 17: Tiger’s future in his 40s Dec. 17: The Tiger effect on youth Dec. 30: ‘Golf Central’ birthday special “If that’s all the golf we show today,” Barrow told the crew, “then that’s all the golf we’re going to show.” The network’s commitment to Woods paid off, of course, as he won by 12 shots and launched a new era in golf. The telecast delivered huge ratings for CBS, and the same would be true for Woods’ other 13 major victories, especially his most recent (last?) triumph, the 2008 U.S. Open. Tommy Roy has produced NBC Sports’ golf coverage since 1993, and that Torrey Pines Open still gives him chills. Hobbling around on a broken leg, Woods made two eagles on the back nine Saturday, holed the impossibly bumpy, expect-anything-different? putt to force a playoff and then prevailed in overtime against the likable Rocco Mediate. NBC’s coverage of the event beat out thousands of entries in the Outstanding Live Sports Special category at the Emmys.   “I guarantee if it had been Ben Crane doing those exact same things to win the U.S. Open, we wouldn’t have won jack,” Roy said. “It’s because of Tiger.” “Through the years what he has brought to the telecast is a level of electricity that only comes with him being there,” he added. “The fans are more excited, the announcers are more excited, and you can feel that through the telecast. It’s harder to cover logistically, because his group is always surrounded by more fans, but it has almost always been well worth it.” When Woods was at the peak of his powers, no viewer grumbled about the three-hour coverage window being dominated by Woods because the golf was so thrilling, the storylines so clear. If he was leading: How much will he crush his competition by this time? If he was hovering near the top of the leaderboard: What miraculous shot will push him ahead? And if he was trailing by six heading into the back nine, well, even that was straightforward: Stay tuned, folks, because he has more than enough firepower to cut into this deficit!  “Tiger was the only player who took golf from the fourth or fifth page of the sports section not only to the front page, but also the front page of the newspaper, above the fold,” Barrow said. “I’ve always said that Tiger is a story if he’s winning or losing a tournament. People want to know what he’s doing.” Whether that still rings true is debatable. After years of showing nearly all of Woods’ shots because he was the biggest story, because he was what fans craved, networks and other media outlets have been criticized in recent years for being too Tiger-centric. It is the role of the producer to determine how much of Woods’ round is shown, if at all, and it has become a balancing act when he is out of the mix: placating the casual fan who only wants to know how Woods is playing while also appealing to the hardcore golf consumer who expects to watch exciting young stars like Jordan Spieth, Jason Day and Rory McIlroy battle for titles. Swing changes, injury woes and crises in confidence may make Woods a more compelling figure, but bad golf doesn’t lead to a great viewer experience. “Producing telecasts where he had these incredible, memory-making moments far outweigh watching him chunk a chip shot,” Roy said. As a result, most networks have resorted to quickly cutting to Woods finishing out on 18 to wrap up the storyline rather than dragging down a telecast. Which leads to an interesting question for the next few years: If Woods’ mediocrity continues, if he remains a competitive afterthought, will there come a day when he enters a tournament, plays four rounds and isn’t featured in the coverage? “That’s the cruel thing about covering sports,” Barrow said. “The train leaves the station very quickly when there’s nothing there to talk about and cover. If you’re not at the top of the ladder, a lot of people don’t care. So Tiger not being a story, or at least a part of the broadcast, I don’t know if I will see that day, but it may happen. It’s hard for me to believe that, but yeah, I guess it could happen.” MARK BRAZIL KNEW THE CLOCK was ticking. He had 30 minutes after Friday’s play at the PGA Championship to secure Woods for his tournament the following week in North Carolina. What followed was a comedy of errors and miscommunication, and at one point Brazil lost cellphone service and sprinted through a driving rainstorm at Whistling Straits. Finally, he got in front of Woods’ agent, Mark Steinberg, and received the news that he had longed to hear since he took over as tournament director of the Wyndham Championship in 2001.  When Woods’ commitment became official, on Monday morning of tournament week, it created pandemonium in Greensboro. News of Woods’ spot start appeared on every morning talk show.  Wyndham’s social-media accounts exploded. Concession sales increased by 85 percent. Clothing sales doubled, and the specially ordered Tiger Woods hats and shirts sold out by Friday morning. Tournament officials printed 50,000 extra day passes, online ticket sales soared 300 percent, and the overall attendance of 143,000 set a modern tournament record. A local community college was forced to open its parking lots to accommodate the overflow of vehicles. Brazil even doubled the size of the media center to house the reporters who had altered their travel plans and requested credentials. Typically, the media is lodged inside Sedgefield Country Club’s exercise facility, a cozy space that seats about 40. But with Woods coming to town, Brazil’s team removed all of the free weights and machines and built a news conference room by the pool that housed about 70 media members. All for a guy, remember, who was nearly two years removed from his most recent top-10 finish on Tour. “After 22 years in the golf industry, I thought I had a pretty good handle on this Tiger Effect deal,” Brazil said, “but this shocked me.” For a mid-level tournament like the Wyndham, which usually lacks star power because of its date immediately preceding the FedEx Cup Playoffs, Woods’ arrival was a godsend. Even better was that he played his best golf during what was an otherwise dismal year. After sharing the halfway lead, he entered the final round just two shots behind. A triple bogey on the 11th hole ended his chances, but he still recorded a season-best T-10 finish in front of 35,000 fans. “He created a whole new era of golf fans who focus on him no matter what he does or how he plays,” said Davis Love III, who won this year’s event. “They want to see Tiger. That’s why we want him back playing out here. He’s still the draw. He doesn’t have to dominate. He just has to go out and play.” Added Brazil: “Every day he was out there was our biggest day I’ve ever seen.” That possibility likely wouldn’t even have existed a decade ago. A creature of habit, Woods played virtually the same schedule every year, a collection of brawny courses on which he had enjoyed success. But in recent years, as calls for him to play more events increased as he returned from injury or struggled to regain form, Woods has made a few additional stops: He has played his hometown Honda Classic every year since 2012 when healthy; he trekked to The Greenbrier Classic twice in the last four seasons; and this past year, in addition to the Wyndham, he also returned to golf’s most raucous event, the Phoenix Open, for the first time in 14 years. “The vibe changes when he announces whether he’s coming or not,” said Kym Hougham, executive director at the Wells Fargo Championship. “It’s totally one fills up the balloon and one sucks it out.” Woods has played the regular-season stop at Quail Hollow six times since 2004. Some times, he skipped because of injury. Other times, like this past year, he had prior commitments. Whatever the reason, there’s a noticeable difference around town, and Woods’ tendency to wait until the last minute to sign up makes for a stressful 5 p.m. deadline in the tournament office. “Some years I’ve been sweating bullets,” Hougham said, “but the excitement builds quickly. Tickets don’t sit in the drawer when Tiger is here.” But when he’s not, there is decidedly less buzz, even with a field that usually includes McIlroy, Phil Mickelson and Rickie Fowler. There is less national media coverage and recognition. And without the Woods bump, there are fewer people on the course, which shows up in both the concession sales reports and the aerial shots from the blimp. “It’s a gift to the city and the tournament when he does show up,” Hougham said. Few understand that better now than Brazil. Every day for two months, he responded to text messages, fielded phone calls and met fans from California to Florida who had watched or attended one of the most fascinating, and unexpected, tournaments of the year. “He changed that tournament forever, just by him being there that one time,” Jason Gore said. Though Woods raved about his experience, he was non-committal when asked whether he would consider making a return trip to the area. “People keep asking me what we’re expecting for next year,” Brazil said, “and I say that everyone needs to lower their expectations.” A DECADE AGO, TV EXECUTIVES cracked that Woods didn’t just move the needle – he was the needle. In many respects, he still is, even as his body continues to betray him. This year, ESPN’s first round of the Masters – Woods’ first tournament in more than two months because his game wasn’t up to his standards – attracted the largest audience and highest rating for an opening day since 2010, when Woods returned to golf following his sex scandal. On Saturday, Woods shot 68 to vault onto the first page of the leaderboard, though he was still miles behind the 21-year-old phenom Spieth. CBS’ third-round coverage drew an average metered market rating of 6.5 – up 48 percent from last year’s event, which Woods sat out because of back surgery, and the highest mark since 2011. And how about the Wyndham, the normally sleepy event before the playoffs? Because of Woods, the final round produced a 3.9 rating – the highest for a non-major since 2013, and a 160 percent bump over last year’s event, won by Camilo Villegas. Even more telling: The Wyndham’s third round drew a higher rating and slightly more viewers than comparable rounds for the PGA Championship and U.S. Open. Five of the top eight most-read stories (and 13 of the top 30) on this website this year were Woods-related, and a video of his swing created the most engagement on Golf Channel’s digital channels. And though Woods has yet to fully embrace his own account, he still is king when it comes to Twitter followers, checking in at 5.1 million – nearly double the amount of the next-closest golfer, McIlroy. Even the @GCTigerTracker account, created in 2012 to document Woods’ every move, has more than 132,000 followers. “The more success he has, the greater the appeal,” said Greg McLaughlin, who ran the Tiger Woods Foundation for 14 years, “but he’s still a 14-time major winner, and as long as he’s in a tournament and competing he’s going to be a focal point and generate a lot of interest.” But with numerous advertising campaigns focusing on the next wave of talent, it’s clear that PGA Tour executives are already bracing for their post-Tiger reality. Earlier this year, commissioner Tim Finchem recalled how long it took for the golf world to come to grips with Jack Nicklaus saying goodbye. The sport needed years to recover, and the Tour is likely in line for another market correction once Woods hangs up his spikes. “It’s going to happen,” Finchem said, “so the more relevant question is: How bad is it when it happens? We need other stars to develop.” By season’s end, he looked prophetic: Spieth earned Player of the Year honors, a healthy Day broke through for his first major and McIlroy won four times worldwide, setting the foundation for a new Big Three in golf. “The fans really responded to these guys playing at that level,” Finchem said this month. “If that continues, we’re going to be in good shape.” But what remains to be seen is whether these compelling young stars can draw in the casual viewer that, as CBS’ Barrow said, elevates golf from the sports section to the front page. Winless since August 2013, Woods is still the only player who wields that immense power, but even his personal narrative has shifted. After his career was defined by the certainty of winning, there now is a curiosity and vagueness surrounding Woods that makes him an irresistible attraction for sports observers. “He has been such an exceptional player that his fall to [416th] in the world or whatever he is now is hard to imagine,” said Hank Haney, who coached Woods from 2004-2010. “As long as he shows up, people are going to be fascinated to see if the greatness in Tiger appears again.” Granted, it used to appear for weeks at a time, even months. Now, the surges are less frequent, more unpredictable – a few good holes, a few promising rounds. All of which is why Woods’ throwback performance at the Wyndham resonated so strongly. From his holed pitch shot on his opening hole to his putter raises after dropping 30-footers to his birdies in Sunday red, he suddenly erased months of bad memories and morphed into the player that looked so familiar.   “I was watching on my computer, and the guys were going nuts, screaming, ‘He’s back! He’s back!’” said former Tour winner Arron Oberholser, who was calling the action that day for the PGA Tour’s radio network. “Every time he does something he’s ‘back,’ but it is just another sign that there is still some magic in there.” Of course, only the most delusional of sports fans expect the old Tiger to return – the 45 percent win rates, the blowout major victories, the record stay at world No. 1. Instead, they continue to swarm Woods’ group for the same reason they packed stadiums and arenas to watch Derek Jeter flail at a curveball off the plate, or Peyton Manning hurl interceptions, or Kobe Bryant clank mid-range jumpers. “People want the old Tiger back because of the feelings he created,” Oberholser said. “Maybe if they show up at a tournament, they’re hoping to see just a glimpse of that greatness he once had. In reality, that particular greatness is gone and won’t return, but every once in a while you see it for a round, for a day. It’s a shadow. Now, it’s just hope for people.” An athlete’s exit rarely is graceful. Guaranteed contracts, diminished skills, stubborn champions and nostalgic fans are a toxic combination, but in golf there are no antsy general managers or owners to push fading superstars out the door. It’s up to the players to look deeply inward, to decide when they’ve endured enough competitive punishment. Anyone who heard Woods’ sobering remarks at the World Challenge senses that day is closer than ever before. Beaten down by two decades in the spotlight and a litany of injuries, including three back surgeries in the past 18 months, Woods sounded equal parts resigned and relieved. His legacy was secure years ago, but the Tiger Effect continues to evolve. This phenomenon has always encompassed more than just the wins and the losses, the record books and the rankings. At its core, it’s about the evolution of a global icon, the thrill of a generational talent performing at a higher level than everyone ever has, and the hope that, maybe, just maybe, it all could last just a few moments longer. “Tiger used to do things that were mystical, that were magical, and because of that you still believe that it can possibly happen again,” said NBC’s Roy. “Common sense says no, but that’s what people feel, and I don’t think they have given up on that feeling just yet.”last_img read more

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