Webb eyes major No. 8 with Olympics on horizon

first_imgHARRISON, N.Y. – Karrie Webb has hoisted seven major championship trophies in her career. Nobody teeing it up this week at the KPMG Women’s PGA Championship has won more majors. In fact, only six women in the history of golf have won more. Only real legends have won more, only Patty Berg (15), Mickey Wright (13), Louise Suggs (11), Annika Sorenstam (10), Babe Zaharias (10) and Betsy Rawls (8). That’s what made Webb’s admission so telling after she closed out a 2-under-par 71 Friday at the KPMG Women’s PGA Championship to move into weekend position to win her eighth major. She tees it up Saturday one shot behind Sei Young Kim. “I didn’t sleep well last night,” Webb said. “I don’t know if it’s been awhile since I’ve played with that much adrenaline. I just still had it in my body when I was trying to go to sleep.” Webb still has the drive to win on the game’s grandest stages. Twenty years after she won her first LPGA title, 16 years after she won her first major, she still craves more. “I was a little antsy,” Webb said of Friday’s start. KPMG Women’s PGA: Articles, videos and photos At 40, Webb is still driven by a dream. She wants to win an Olympic gold medal for her native Australia with golf returning to the Olympics next year. There’s still a lot of “want to” in Webb’s game and there’s something special to appreciate in that because she might not be around a whole lot longer, at least not with this same high level of ambition. She has told us this Olympic bid fuels her and after it’s over we might not see as much of her. Even if we do, we might not see the same burning desire. We saw Annika Sorenstam hit the wall after performing at such a high level for so many years. Sorenstam stepped away from the game at 37. We saw Lorena Ochoa do the same at 28. There’s longevity to Webb’s excellence to marvel over as she makes this last hard run of hers through the Olympics next year because this level of excellence can’t be fueled forever. This is a huge investment Webb is making to win gold. “I sort of feel like I am going to play as full a schedule as I have, and work as hard as I have, for the next two years and then see where that shakes out,” Webb said earlier this year. “I could be playing close to the best golf of my career, and it could be really hard to scale back. Or, I might just be ready for a break. Or, I might be somewhere in between.” Webb went to work changing her swing with Mike McGetrick last year, and we’re seeing the fruit of their work. Webb is full of confidence as she seeks to win her first major since taking the Kraft Nabisco in 2006. “I definitely think my game is as good as it’s ever been,” Webb said. “It’s just a matter of getting out of my own way and allowing that to happen.” The women’s game is so much younger than the men’s game. Webb is reminded of that all the time with 18-year-old Lydia Ko reigning as the Rolex No. 1, with 19-year-old Hyo Joo Kim beating her down the stretch at the Evian Championship last year, with 17-year-old Brooke Henderson contending this week. “It makes me think about my age,” said Webb, who won twice last season. “It’s fun to watch the young kids play because I know I used to be that fearless, and that’s probably the only thing I wish I had. Because, obviously, as you get older, it doesn’t matter what we’re doing, we all lose that little bit of fearlessness that we have when we were young. But I think for me, the experience of knowing myself very well, and what I need to do to play well, is just as important.” Juli Inkster can appreciate what it takes to keep the love of the game going strong enough to do the work it takes to keep pace with all the youth in the women’s game. Inkster, like Webb, has won seven majors. At 54, Inkster made the cut this week. Laura Davies can appreciate Webb’s longevity, too. She’s 51 and she also made the cut. With Webb going out with Kim as the leaders in the final pairing Saturday, Webb is right where she wants to be, trying to control all the adrenalin that comes with being in contention and trying to get a good night’s sleep. “I feel comfortable with where I put myself,” Webb said. “Who knows if that will be leading or tied for the lead or one behind tomorrow. I’m just really happy to have played the course really solidly for two days and see what happens on the weekend.”last_img read more

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Fiery La. Politician Leads Fight To Clean Up Oil

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreOne of the areas hardest hit by the BP oil spill is Louisiana’s southernmost Parish located along the 70 miles of Mississippi river that empties into the Gulf of Mexico. But the residents have something in their arsenal to help keep the oil out of their prized marshlands: Billy Nungesser. The parish president is a newcomer to politics who isn’t afraid to take on BP or the Coast Guard to save the livelihood of his home. From an emergency management center, he recently ordered his staff to ignore BP and put parish equipment out in the water to suck up the oil: “I should have told them to get the hell out of the way two weeks ago, but we are putting [this] equipment and we’re putting the skimmers in the water. I don’t give a s – – – what anybody says.” (READ the story from National Public Radio) …Thanks, also, to Roxana for submitting this New York Times article about the same story! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

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Malaria in pregnancy now complicated by drug resistance

first_imgMalaria is one of the most preventable causes of adverse pregnancy outcomes, but any gains made in the last decade at preventing the mosquito-borne illness in pregnancy may be lost as resistance to the prophylactic treatment sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine is rising. A new series in The Lancet Infectious Diseases takes stock of the current challenges facing women at risk of malaria infections in pregnancy.The past 10 years have seen a number of successes, the journal authors write, including lowered prevalence of Plasmodium vivax in Asia and Latin America and decreasing rates of Plasmodium falciparum in parts of Africa, but access to easy screening and testing is still lacking in resource-poor countries.Pregnant women, the authors suggest, are malaria’s sentinels because they frequent health clinics in low-resource countries. Malaria-endemic countries would do well to focus their resources on this group.”A deeper understanding of the biology of malaria infection in pregnancy will help to develop new approaches for the successful implementation of malaria elimination strategies to achieve a world free of malaria,” the authors write.Deficits in prevention, treatmentMalaria, along with poor nutrition, is one of the leading causes of low birthweight in many parts of the world, including sub-Saharan Africa. Moreover, malaria can interfere with placental development and function, leading to intrauterine growth restriction.One of the most cost-effective ways to limit malaria exposure is to ensure pregnant women sleep under an insecticide-treated net (ITN), but a study in 2014 showed that only 39% of pregnant women in sub-Saharan Africa used an ITN.Health officials also recommend in endemic countries that pregnant women be treated with intermittent preventive treatment in pregnancy (IPTp) of sulfadoxine–pyrimethamine. But in 2015, only 31.5% of eligible pregnant women received three or more doses of IPTp.Unfortunately, alternative IPTp candidates have not proved to be as effective as sulfadoxine–pyrimethamine, which is susceptible to resistance. Currently, only 7% of sub-Saharan pregnancies occur in places with substantial rates of antimalarial resistance, but that number is expected to grow, the authors said.Of five alternative IPTp candidates tested in the last decade, only dihydroartemisinin–piperaquine has shown promise in pregnant women. Confirmatory trials are ongoing to establish if the treatment is safe for newborns.One promising solution to close these treatment and prevention gaps is the identification of VAR2CSA, a malaria vaccine that offers protective immunity against P falciparum in pregnancy. The vaccine is currently in phase 1 trials. Young women, the authors write, would be ideal candidates for the vaccine.Monitoring drug effects in pregnancyArtemisinin-based combination treatments should be used to treat malaria in the second and third trimesters, the authors reported. In most trials, these treatments have a 85% to 90% success rate in pregnant women. Currently, the World Health Organization recommends the use of quinine with clindamycin for treating malaria in the first trimester, but it may soon be revising its recommendation to include artemisinin-based therapies.Continued pharmacovigilance of first-trimester exposure to antimalarial drugs is needed to further understand the risks of drug exposure, the authors said.See also:Jan 31 Lancet Infect Dis malaria burden studyJan 31 Lancet Infect Dis malaria prevention paperJan 31 Lancet Infect Dis malaria treatment reportlast_img read more

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Bristol Sport Juniors Enjoy Thrill Of Flyers

first_imgA packed crowd at SGS Wise Arena were all behind Bristol Flyers who completed a dramatic late turnaround to beat Plymouth Raiders 80-79 after overtime on Friday night.Downend Saints joined the Flyers 7s membership and St Barnabus School, Bristol took part in our high-5 line-up at the game.Steve Hunter from Downend Saints said: “Thank you so much for all that you did to make Friday so much fun, especially for arranging the game to be so exciting!”.He added: “We had training the next morning and all the boys and parents were still buzzing from the night before, I think we may have quite a few new Flyers fans!”.If you would like to join us at a game please e-mail [email protected]last_img read more

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Blockbuster clash awaits

first_imgOUTER EAST FOOTBALL PREMIER DIVISION – WEEK 1 FINALS PREVIEW QUALIFYING FINAL – NARRE WARREN (2nd) v BEACONSFIELD (3rd) Saturday…[To read the rest of this story Subscribe or Login to the Gazette Access Pass] Thanks for reading the Pakenham Berwick Gazette. Subscribe or Login to read the rest of this content with the Gazette Digital Access Pass subscription. By Nick Creely last_img

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Interview with GAA referee James Molloy

first_imgAudio Playerhttps://download-galwaybay.sharp-stream.com/JAMES%20MOLLOY%20OTL%20TUESDAY%20.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume..print WhatsApp Facebook Twitter Email Ollie Turner spoke to Galway inter-county Gaelic Football referee James Molloy on Tuesday night’s ‘Over the Line‘ programme about the GAA’s new recruitment drive for young referees, the difficulties in being a modern day official, the black card over-excited people on the sideline and much more…!last_img read more

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Galway Hurling Team V Dublin Announced

first_imgInto the team come Paul Killeen at corner back, Sean Loftus at midfield, Niall Burke and Jason Flynn. print WhatsApp Facebook Twitter Email There are 4 Changes on the Galway Senior Hurling for the Clash with Dublin on Saturday evening in Pearse Stadium. Out go Johnny Glynn, who has a hamstring, Joe Canning, Adrian Tuohy and Johnny Coen, though Canning and Coen are on the bench.center_img Killeen’s last start was against the Dubs in the 2017 championship opener (in which he got a Cruciate injury), while Loftus starts a championship game for the first time. Niall Burke and Jason Flynn have been impressing when coming on in the last number of games.Game is live on Galway Bay FM at 7.00pm1 James Skehill2 Paul Killeen3 Daithi Burke4 Aidan Harte5 Padraic Mannion6 Gearoid McInerney7 John Hanbury8 Sean Loftus9 David Burke (Capt.)10 Joseph Cooney11 Niall Burke12 Cathal Mannion13 Conor Whelan14 Conor Cooney15 Jason Flynnlast_img read more

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Son military service blow as South Korea stunned by Malaysia in Asian Games

first_imgTOTTENHAM’S Son Heung-min has been dealt a blow in his quest to avoid military exemption after South Korea lost 2-1 to Malaysia in the Asian Games.The Tottenham winger, 26, came on as a second half substitute during the second match in Group E, but failed to help his side get a result.4 South Korean winger Son Heung-min needs to win the Asian Games to be exempt from military serviceCredit: Getty Images – Getty4 Tottenham ace Son could be facing two years of military serviceCredit: Getty Images – GettyFailure to win the Asian Games would require Son to undergo two years of military service.Under Korean law, all men must do 21 months of National Service before they turn 28.South Korea are the defending champions of the tournament, having beat North Korea in the final four years ago.Son’s former side Bayer Leverkusen refused to let the forward participate in the 2014 Asian Games in UAE.Tottenham boss Mauricio Pochettino tries his hand at the Dele Alli celebration 4 Son, 26, started on the bench for the Group E defeat against Malaysia todayCredit: Getty Images – GettyA bit of a bump in Son Hyeumg-min’s road to military exemption. South Korea have lost their second group match at the Asian Games 2-1 to Malaysia. They’re 2nd in the group which would be enough to reach the next round. Son came on as a sub. Bet he starts the next one…— Mani Djazmi (@BBC_Mani) August 17, 2018 Son Heung-min replies to Pedro Obiang’s goal with an amazing long range effort himself4 Former Bayer Leverkusen forward Son will surely be starting against Kyrgyzstan on MondayCredit: Getty Images – GettyBut they are in danger of crashing out after Safawi Rasid netted a goal in either half, before Hwang Ui-jo pulled a goal back at the death.And you can expect Son to be in the starting line when South Korea face Kyrgyzstan in their final group match on Monday.Kyrgyzstan currently sit third in the group following their 2-2 draw against Bahrain, and know a win against South Korea would see them leapfrog their upcoming opponents.Son came narrowly close to exemption from national service in 2015, but Korea lost against Australia in the final of the 2015 AFC Asian Cup.Tottenham striker Son Heung-min is proud of the club’s young players who starred on the U.S. tour MOST READ IN FOOTBALLRETRACING STEPSJack Charlton’s granddaughter Emma Wilkinson ‘would love’ to visit IrelandROY RAGEFurious Roy Keane launched foul-mouthed rant at Pique over Fabregas friendshipPicturedTOP FORMBrazil icon Ronaldo soaks up sun with partner Celina Locks on yacht in FormenteraPicturedON THE PAOLPaolo Maldini shows off shredded physique at 52 while on holiday with wifeLive BlogUNITED LATESTMan Utd transfer news LIVE: All the gossip and updates from Old TraffordExclusiveLOCK CLOWNPaul Scholes flouts local lockdown rules by throwing huge 7-hour birthday bashlast_img read more

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Mbanjwa makes Dusi history

first_img20 January 2008History was made in South Africa’s Dusi Canoe Marathon on the weekend, when both the men’s and women’s winners in the K2 race taking victory in record times and Michael Mbanjwa became the first black winner in the 57-year history of the event.Teaming up with the “Dusi Duke”, Martin Dreyer, Mbanjwa brought huge smiles to the inhabitants of the Valley of a Thousand Hills, which was where he was born and is part of the race’s route.Development successHis win also provided validation for the development efforts of Canoeing South Africa; Mbanjwa is a product of the Nagle Dam club, formed by canoeing pioneer, the late Robert Lembethe, to bring the sport to people who live along the route of the famous event.In 1997, Mbanjwa was on his way to a game of soccer when he was stopped by Lembethe, who told him to give canoeing a try. He gave it a go, having seen paddlers in the valley before, never thinking that he might one day be crowned the winner of the famous race. On Saturday, he made history.Mbanjwa has heard the story about being the first black winner many times previously; in 2007, he and Dreyer won the Stihl Non-Stop Dusi, but, for Mbanjwa, it’s a story that he would prefer not to hear.Instead of being viewed as a successful black paddler, he would prefer to be viewed as a successful elite paddler, one whose record speaks for itself. With his victory, he has surely earned that right, but his win, as a first in the history of the race, made it an historic occasion.While it was Mbanjwa’s first victory in the Dusi, following a second place in the K1 race in 2007, it was a seventh win for Dreyer. Afterwards, the 39-year-old said it was his final competitive shot at the event; he will participate in it in the future, but simply to take part and not to win it.Record setting first stageMbanjwa and Dreyer showed they meant business on the first leg of the race, with a record time of two hours, 32 minutes and 47 seconds, to build up a lead of almost four minutes over Hank McGregor and Sven Bruss.Ant Stott and Wayne Thompson, second in the last K2 event in 2006, finished the day in third, just over six minutes behind the leaders.There was drama when McGregor and Bruss protested against a path taken by Stott and Thompson, which took the pair out of bounds. The third-placed finishers were disqualified, but were later reinstated after an appeal, but fined R1 000.On day two, Stott and Thompson responded brilliantly to their near-disqualification, setting a record for the stage of two hours, 44 minutes and 14 seconds. Mbanjwa and Dreyer held onto the lead, but saw it severely cut, with their stage time of two hours, 48 minutes and 29 seconds leaving them with an advantage of only one minute and 46 seconds.McGregor and Bruss chose an aggressive approach, but it backfired when McGregor took a spill at the Washing Machine Rapid, followed shortly afterwards by Bruss. Once they were back in their boat they charged hard for the finish, ultimately bettering Mbanjwa and Dreyer’s time by one second, but they, nonetheless, fell to third in the standings.Final day tacticsThe final day saw the Stott/Thompson and McGregor/Bruss pairings choosing to shoot a number of big rapids to try to close down Mbanjwa/Dreyer, who chose to portage at the notorious Burma Road.The leaders responded brilliantly, recording the fastest ever time on the portage to stave off the challenge of the chasing boats.By the time they reached the finish line at the Blue Lagoon in Durban, Mbanjwa and Dreyer had not only held off the chasing crews, they had increased their lead and established a new record in a time of seven hours, 33 minutes and 24 seconds.Stott and Thompson took second in 7:35:05, while McGregor and Bruss ended third in 7:39:52 as the top three all bettered the previous record of 7:40:25, set by Dreyer and McGregor in 2006.Not long after their win, Mbanjwa and Dreyer were flown by helicopter to Nagle Dam, in the Valley of a Thousand Hills, where a huge crowd greeted the Dusi winners, cheering and ululating, and lifting them onto their shoulders.Women’s raceThe result of the women’s race was fairly predictable, with the only thing really standing between the red hot favourites Abbey Miedema and Alexa Lombard and victory being the challenging river.They, however, had a superbly smooth run from start to finish, breaking the stage record on all three days, to capture the honours.On the opening day, Miedema and Lombard, who smashed the K2 record by a staggering 25 minutes in 2006, opened up a lead of over 10 minutes over their nearest challengers, Laura Thompson and Robyn Kime, an interesting pairing of a 20-Dusi veteran and a promising schoolgirl.Former winner Debbie Germiquet and Hilary Pitchford crossed the line in third place, nearly seven minutes behind the second place finishers and 17 minutes and three seconds behind the leaders.Increasing the leadOn day two, Miedema and Lombard increased their lead, despite a valiant effort from Thompson and Kime. The leaders were four minutes and 24 seconds faster in a stage record 3:09:55.With a massive lead in the bag, Miedema and Lombard choose a conservative approach on the final day, opting not to put the beckoning victory at risk. Once again, though, they turned in the fastest time of the day.Their overall time of 8:46:03 shattered the previous mark they had set two years ago of 9:02:12, but over 16 minutes.Thompson and Kime finished well back in second, but not far off the previous record, in a time of 9:05:06. Germiquet and Pitchford settled for third, over 25 minutes behind the runners-up. Want to use this article in your publication or on your website?See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

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Cape ‘tjommies’ help out visitors

first_img18 April 2008Dressed in yellow bibs and only too eager to help, the “Tjommies” (Afrikaans slang for “friends”) are eight formerly unemployed youngsters turned visitor guides, giving tourists advice on attractions in and around Cape Town and helping them have a hassle-free holiday.The Tjommies Ambassador Project is the brainchild of non-profit organisation Men on the Side of the Road (MSR) in partnership with the City of Cape Town.Through this project, the city can help ensure tourist safety while providing unemployed youngsters to access employment opportunities in different segments of the tourism industry.Tjommies shift manager Anton Peterson told BuaNews this week that the concept was developed in December last year as part of developing visitor services in the city ahead of the 2010 Fifa World Cup.“They are trained to assist tourists and are provided with maps, guides and season specific information,” he said. “Training on the city’s heritage and tourist attractions and how to present themselves to tourists is also given.”Peterson said that visitors from Europe as well as from other African countries were making use of the Tjommies’ services, with plans afoot to employ 100 Tjommies around the city by 2009.Already, a further 15 youngsters started this week on their training to be Tjommies in Cape Town.Representing city and country28-year-old Nosipo Damane from the township of Gugulethu outside Cape Town was recruited as a Tjommie in December 2007, and described herself as lucky to be part of the group.“In my job I meet different people everyday. It is even better to help visitors from outside South Africa because then I have to be at my best as am not only representing Cape Town, but South Africa as my country,” she told BuaNews.However, tourists were sometimes sceptical about the Tjommies and were a little apprehensive when approached.“Sometimes visitors become defensive. Maybe they think I am a beggar or criminal but I was trained on how to deal with different situations and all in all I enjoy every minute.”Developing local tourismThe City of Town has contributed about R250 000 towards training the Tjommies, who receive a basic salary and can receive tips.“The tourism industry welcomed the implementation of the project and we want to build on its performance leading up to hosting the World Cup,” said Simon Grindrod, the city councillor in charge of economic development and tourism.Nationally, the world cup is expected to create 80 000 jobs in the tourism and hospitality sectors.The city has shown a positive growth in occupancies over the festive season, according to a snap accommodation survey conducted by the Cape Town Tourism Department.“The 2007/08 festive season has been a bumper season, as predicted by the tourism industry,” said the department.Further to this, Cape Town reported no serious visitor safety incidents at any of the main tourist attractions during December.“We believe that the collaborative approach between all stakeholders, citizens and visitors contributed significantly to improving visitor safety,” Grindrod said.Aside from the Tjommies Ambassador Project, other city-supported projects include the Festive Season Visitor Welcome and Safety Campaign and the Safety Awareness Campaign.Source: BuaNewslast_img read more

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