Donaldson leads by three in Thailand; Bubba shoots 71

first_imgCHONBURI, Thailand – Jamie Donaldson of Wales enjoyed a sizzling opening round of 9-under-par 63 to take a three-stroke lead over three players including 2013 winner Sergio Garcia in the Thailand Championship on Thursday. Donaldson, who hasn’t won in 16 months, birdied his first four holes and the last two at Amata Spring Country Club, and said, “I couldn’t really do things wrong. “I never really missed any fairways. The good par save on nine was the key to keep the momentum going after pushing the tee shot a little bit. I got up and down there from about 20 feet.” Garcia, who lifted his 23rd career title in Vietnam last weekend, and locals Chinnarat Phadungsilp and Chanat Sakulpolphaisan were at 6 under. Garcia was on par after his second bogey on the 10th hole, then reeled off six birdies over the last eight holes. “It was a wonderful back nine,” he said. Chinnarat spoiled his round with a double bogey on the 15th hole, while Chanat bogeyed the 16th. Martin Kaymer, who lost to Lee Westwood by one shot 12 months ago, shot a bogey-free 68 to lie five behind Donaldson, while Westwood began with a 1-under 71, as did Bubba Waston, who won the World Challenge in the Bahamas last weekend. Nathan Holman, who won his home Australian PGA title last week, carded a par 72.last_img read more

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Getting in the Game

first_img Stay Connected with the Daily Roundup. Sign up for our newsletter and get the best of the Beacon delivered every day to your inbox. There was nothing special, really, about the way Ryan Wardinsky played in the 1998 Montana-Alberta Class AA American Legion state baseball tournament in Whitefish.He was special, sure, but not in any way that was markedly different from the way he had been special on the diamond for much of his life — smacking baseballs all over the park, gobbling up grounders from the middle of the infield and even tossing a few innings on the mound.The athletic Wardinsky had few peers in Montana baseball but that itself was part of the problem. Having been blessedly cursed by being born and raised in Northwest Montana, Wardinsky dominated the competition he faced but drew the attention of pretty much no one else. The teenager would spend his days researching college baseball programs, dreaming of one day playing in front of thousands of rabid fans against the world’s toughest competition, while his coach spent his days begging for someone, anyone, to take a look at the understated star he had in his midst.They finally did late in his senior season.“We had a tough time getting him recruited just because of the nature of baseball in Montana,” Randy Shipman, the Lakers’ AA coach from 1995-98, said. “Then coach (Ken) Johnson came and watched the state tournament for five minutes and said, ‘I need to sign that kid,’ and I said, ‘Yeah you do.’”Johnson would sign Wardinsky to join his program at Walla Walla (Washington) Community College and send the infielder on a years-long journey in baseball that continues today as Wardinsky enters his 14th season as an area scout for the Miami Marlins.It’s a journey through the sport unlike many others in Montana history, and it’s part of what brings Wardinsky back to the state every summer to put on clinics to teach the next generation of Treasure State ballplayers about the game and, perhaps, keep a dream alive for a young star just waiting to be seen.“(Wardinsky)’s a great example of what we have,” Shipman, who coached for 24 years in Montana, said. “Some of them can play at a really high level.”On a warm summer morning this July, Wardinsky, 38, is sitting in the Lakers dugout at Griffin Field and reminiscing about the worst injury of his athletic career.It was here in the summer after his junior year of high school — his second-to-last year with the Lakers — that Wardinsky had raced into the outfield to chase after a popup. So too had his teammates, both the center fielder and second baseman, and as gravity brought the ball tumbling to the earth at precisely the wrong moment in precisely the wrong spot, Wardinsky and the two other Lakers crashed together violently.“I got hit hard by somebody,” he said, still a little foggy on the details of the actual collision. “When I got to the emergency room they thought I was in a car wreck.”Wardinsky ruptured his spleen, among other ailments, and spent days in the hospital. He missed most of that baseball season, costing himself a chance to make headway in scouting circles among both college and professional recruiters.But while scouts may not have been paying attention to him, Wardinsky was paying attention to the larger baseball world and trying to map out a future by himself.“My last year or two of high school I did quite a bit of research on various Division I programs around the country,” he said. “I narrowed it down to, if I could choose one place, it would be Texas A&M.”One year later, Wardinsky got on a hot streak the second half of his final season of legion baseball and carried that into what would be a sensational state tournament. When he talked to Ken Johnson, then the head coach at Walla Walla Community College, Johnson, now smitten with the young shortstop, let it slip that he just so happened to have connections at his dream school, Texas A&M.“(Johnson) told me, ‘If you come play for me for one year, I’ll get you into any program in the country you want,’” Wardinsky recalled. “And for some reason I trusted him and believed him, and I’m glad I did because it worked out just like he said it would.”Before committing to Walla Walla, Wardinsky was picked by the Colorado Rockies in the 37th round of the 1998 draft as a draft-and-follow prospect, meaning the Rockies would retain his rights and could offer to sign him up until the next year’s draft. After one season at Walla Walla, though, Wardinsky discovered that Texas A&M needed a middle infielder and the decision — whether to sign with the Rockies, remain at Walla Walla or transfer to join the Aggies — was an easy one.“It’s one of those programs where baseball really mattered,” Wardinsky said. “There’s not a ton of places where college baseball really is a major draw, and at A&M it was and continues to be. I’m biased now, looking back, but I think A&M’s probably the best place in America to play college baseball.”Wardinsky played three years for the Aggies and their devoted fans, piling up 138 hits in 143 games and batting .304 with a .413 on-base average as a senior. Following that season, another baseball dream would come true: Wardinsky was once again drafted, this time by the Philadelphia Phillies in the 30th round, and signed his first professional contract.But while Wardinsky once carried dreams of being an MLB star, by the time he turned pro he had spent three years competing in one of the nation’s toughest conferences and had made an uncommonly candid self-assessment.“I think a lot of players get into pro ball and maybe aren’t totally realistic with their abilities or where they fit in the scheme of things relative to getting to the big leagues,” he said. “And I don’t think I was ever in that category.”After two years of grinding away in the minor leagues, Wardinsky retired as a player and returned to Texas A&M having fallen in love with the school and the state during his playing days. There he earned a Master’s degree in sports management, unsure of what his next job would be, while his wife, Jodi, had a little more clarity.“I knew going into it that baseball was Ryan’s love,” she said. “There was never a question of whether he was going to stay in baseball or not.”Not long after completing his post-graduate degree, Wardinsky attended Major League Baseball Scout School, an invitation-only seminar the league hosts for training up-and-coming observers of the sport, and was fortunate enough to quickly land a job working for the Marlins.In the 14 years since then, the Kalispell native has moved his family first to the Oklahoma City area and now a suburb of Houston, The Woodlands, where Jodi teaches at a local elementary school and the pair raises their young daughters, ages 6 and 8.Jodi and Ryan met in the second grade and started dating 21 years ago when both were star athletes at Flathead High School. Then Jodi Hagestad, Ryan’s future wife would go on to play volleyball at Carroll College and the pair was married after graduation, just before Ryan needed to report to the Phillies.“Our honeymoon was driving down to Florida for spring training,” Jodi recalled with a laugh.The scouting life keeps Ryan on the road quite a bit, although as the area scout for a fairly condensed south Texas region, he spends considerably more nights at home than when he was covering a handful of Midwestern states. Still, the unglamorous world of scouting does have its downsides.“There’s certain challenges,” he said. “The travel, being away from home, all that stuff can be difficult … It’s tough on your family when you’re gone so much and you miss things at home.”For her part, Jodi said her teaching job helps make co-parenting easier and she even occasionally takes their daughters along to help dad scout. She added that while the sport may be her husband’s first love, it’s not his top priority.“He’s a good husband and just a really good dad, and that’s what’s important,” she said. “Even though I know baseball’s his first love, I know he always puts his family ahead of that.”Ryan’s baseball life has taken him around the country to see or play the game, and his scouting prowess has produced a trio of MLB players thus far, including the hard-hitting Logan Morrison (now with the Minnesota Twins) and Marlins pitcher Dillon Peters.Even with some success, however, Wardinsky knows his future in the game is far from a guarantee. Professional sports teams are famously fickle and rarely hesitate to make personnel changes, especially when a new administration takes over. The Marlins, under new ownership since 2017, fired their scouting director just weeks ago, and while Wardinsky said he was recently reassured his job was safe, that’s no guarantee in the short or long term.“I know that it’s an unstable industry by nature, but hopefully I can stay in the game as long as I can,” he said. “You just try to focus on the things you can control.”So for now Wardinsky will return to the road, scouring the ball fields of south Texas for the next superstar, after he finishes holding the dual baseball clinics — one in Kalispell and one in Butte — that he has put on for the last six years. For Wardinsky it’s a way to give a little back to his home state and provide hope and guidance for the next Montana ballplayer dreaming of making it big.“He got a lot out of the game and now he’s able to give some of it back, and it’s awesome for him to do that,” Shipman said. “For the kids that are playing now, he’s a tremendous role model … ‘There’s a guy that came from Kalispell, Montana and made it pretty big time, and I can do it, too.’”[email protected] Emaillast_img read more

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States Put the ‘Home’ in Nursing Homes

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreThe Leonard Florence Center for Living in Chelsea, Mass., is part of what’s known as the Green House project, founded by geriatrician Dr. Bill Thomas as an alternative to traditional nursing  homes. Each apartment includes a large, centrally located kitchen and dining room designed to be the heart of the home. Residents often take part in meal planning and preparation.The Center, in a working-class neighborhood on the outskirts of Boston is technically a nursing facility — a place most people hope they can avoid. But for Rhoda Klein, age 79, this five-story urban complex feels like home. There’s a calm and comfortable atmosphere in Klein’s apartment, which she’s decorated with her own furnishings. Outside Klein’s door is a common area with an open kitchen, a fireplace and a long dining room table where other residents in her suite often hang out to talk or eat. The residents interact with their caregivers, assigned four at a time to the suite, with the ease of old friends. There aren’t many rules or schedules to follow. “I decide every morning what I want to do that day,” Klein says. “I can share group meals if I want to. Or play bingo and just have a snack. If I get hungry later, someone will make me a meal.”Klein’s nursing home lifestyle is also notable for what it isn’t. There’s no long gray linoleum corridors with doors that open onto shared rooms with nothing but a curtain between the beds. No beeping monitors or carts full of soiled linens and no patients in wheelchairs parked in the hallways. Few rules govern when, what and where residents can eat. The brand new facility is one of a new breed of small, homey nursing facilities cropping up around the country, thanks to state collaborations with the nursing home industry, federal regulators and advocates for the elderly and disabled. It looks like a place only wealthy families could afford, but about half of its residents get their bills paid by Medicaid, the federal-state health care program for the poor.Massachusetts played a big role in making the $37 million center in Chelsea possible. And it’s encouraging other nursing homes across the state to provide similar settings and more personalized services, whether in new buildings or traditional ones. In fact, nearly every state now is promoting what policymakers and advocates simply call “culture change” — creating environments for the aged and disabled that feel more home-like than institutional.But it isn’t easy to reverse habits and procedures or undo the architecture of institutions that have been around since the 1960s, when the enactment of Medicare and Medicaid spawned a major expansion of the nursing home industry.For millions of Americans — and state governments, too — the question of what kind of care nursing homes should provide will be impossible to avoid in the coming years. By 2020, the number of people aged 85 years and older — those most likely to need long-term care — will reach 15.4 million, up from 4.3 million in 2000, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. For states, nursing homes and other long-term care services represent more than 30 percent of a more than $320 billion annual Medicaid bill.The reason nursing homes have traditionally had an institutional feel to them is that most were designed in the mode of hospitals. That mentality extended to the physical space, leading to a standard two-wing design with a nurse’s station in the middle — a floor plan known in the industry as the “double-loaded corridor.” It also extended to the state regulations and rules governing everyday life in nursing homes. These tended to favor considerations for safety and medical care over concern for residents’ quality of life.As a result, frail elders in nursing homes have suffered from the “three plagues of boredom, helplessness and loneliness,” says Dr. Bill Thomas, a geriatric physician and a leader in the culture change movement. A self-described nursing home “abolitionist,” Thomas would like to see old-style nursing homes eliminated altogether.That won’t happen anytime soon. The nursing home industry is not growing; it’s shrinking. Despite an increase in the number of frail elders who need care, more are opting to remain at home or enter an assisted living facility where they can live more independently.According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, there are some 16,000 nursing homes in the United States, averaging about 30 years old with an occupancy rate of 86 percent. Most of them were designed the old way, and many will need renovation or replacement in the next decade. In their place, Thomas wants to see more small cottages or apartments like the one Klein lives in at the Leonard Florence Center — designed for 10 to 12 residents with skilled health care workers who give individual attention to each person. Thomas’ design has been replicated in 50 such facilities in 13 states, built with the support of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and NCB Capital Impact, a nonprofit community development organization. Dozens of other small nursing facilities have been built across the country with the same goals in mind, gaining support from private donations, and in some cases, direct state and federal grants.States are adopting new attitudes toward regulation so that facilities can create more home-like settings and give elders more privacy and control over their environment. Arkansas, for example, recently changed a rule that prevented residents from using air fresheners in their rooms. The state also got rid of a regulation that prevented nursing facilities from serving hot coffee from a cart early in the morning instead of making residents wait for a cold cup on their breakfast trays.It’s a lot of little things, says Carol Shockley, Arkansas director of long-term care. But they make a big difference in people’s daily lives. Residents especially appreciate having more control over what they eat. “If a resident just hates broccoli,” Shockely says, “a nursing home ought to be able to take it off his plate.”Workforce training is another important piece, because few health care workers have had experience with what is known in the culture change movement as “person-centered” care. Instead, they’ve typically performed just one of the services needed to support a frail elder or disabled adult.Massachusetts spent more than $200 million over an eight-year period to train and mentor health care workers in this new method of care, although that program has been cut back since the recession. Georgia, Kansas, Michigan, North Carolina, Oregon and Vermont made similar investments.States have found other ways to push culture change in nursing homes. Rhode Island has developed a survey that grades facilities based on whether they look more like an institution or a home, whether they allow residents flexibility in their sleeping and eating schedules and how well they’ve reduced annoying noises. Colorado pioneered a point system that bumps up Medicaid reimbursement rates for facilities that provide more home-like settings. Oklahoma has taken similar measures. Arkansas offers a higher Medicaid reimbursement rate for so-called “home-style” nursing homes.With all the budget cutting states have had to do in recent years, and will continue to have to do, it may be difficult for states to make a lot of progress in this area. Still, some are trying. Orinially published by Stateline.orgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

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ERI Group Founder Rick Miller Has Retired

first_imgDeMoulpied comes to LSI from the Private Client Services practice of Ernst & Young where he managed strategy & operations improvement engagements for privately held client businesses. Some of his prior roles include VP of strategic development, director of strategic initiatives, and Lean Six Sigma Master Black Belt at OptumHealth, UnitedHealth Group’s health services business, as well as Lean Six Sigma Black Belt at General Electric, where he applied operations improvement principles to customer service, supply chain and product development. A successful entrepreneur, deMoulpied is also the founder of PrestoFresh, a Cleveland-based e-commerce food/grocery business.  With more than 20 years of experience across multiple industries and functional areas, deMoulpied has particular expertise in organizations with complex technical products. Combined, his prior positions have required a spectrum of skills in corporate strategy, operations improvement, product quality, and revenue cycle management. He has an impressive history of utilizing data driven problem solving (Lean Six Sigma) and project management (PMP and CSM) to achieve strategic goals surrounding customer satisfaction, operational efficiency and improved profit.  LSI President Brett Tennar says, “Steve’s success in developing operational strategies that improves the bottom line, builds teamwork, reduces waste and ensures quality product development and distribution checks many of the boxes of what we were looking for in a COO. This, coupled with his career in the Air Force working with highly technical systems and his in-depth understanding of Lean Six Sigma and Business Process Management sealed our offer. As our tagline states, our products are Powered by Science. This data driven approach is one reason why our company has grown exponentially as we employ the most advanced technology to product development. I am confident that Steve is the right person to drive operational strategy for our diverse and growing brands.” Advertisement Engine Rebuilders Inc. (E.R.I. Group) has announced the retirement of longtime President and Founder Rick Miller.AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisementMiller has been president of E.R.I. for 35 years and will be named president emeritus. He will remain as a consultant and chairman of the board of directors for an extended period. A successor will be named at a later date.In announcing Miller’s retirement, E.R.I. Group stated, “We thank Rick for his dedication and service to the Engine Rebuilding industry and the success of the members of The E.R.I. Group.”,Lubrication Specialties Inc. (LSI), manufacturer of Hot Shot’s Secret brand of performance additives and oils, recently announced the expansion of senior leadership. Steve deMoulpied joins LSI as the company’s chief operating officer (COO). AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisement DeMoulpied has a Bachelor of Science degree in Engineering Management from the United States Air Force Academy and a Master of Business Administration degree from the University of Dayton in Marketing and International Business. He served six years with the USAF overseeing the development of technology used on fighter aircraft and the E-3 Surveillance aircraft, finishing his career honorably as Captain.last_img read more

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OriginGPS Unveils Miniature GNSS Module for L1 + L5 Bands

first_imgOriginGPS has introduced its first dual-frequency GNSS module. Measuring just 10 x 10 mm, the ORG4600-B01 module supports L1 + L5 GNSS reception with one RF port, enabling the use of a low-cost, dual-band antenna delivering sub-1 m accuracy performance in real-world operating conditions. An alternate build option allows for separate L1/L5 RF outputs when dual antennas are required. The ORG4600-B01 is ideally suited for solutions requiring ultra-accurate positioning, such as telematics, IoT and OBD applications. This year has seen several satellites launched into orbit every month, most of them fitted with L5/E5 capabilities, and the Chinese and European Union governments plan to have their satellite constellations fully operational by 2020. OriginGPS developed the ORG4600-B01 module with the BCM47758 GNSS receiver chip from Broadcom Inc. This was the fastest and surest way to add a high-quality dual-frequency module to their portfolio and meet customers’ increasing requirements for ultra-accurate GNSS modules. The new module will enable customers to build solutions with sub-1m accuracy without implementing external components. Size is a crucial parameter in GNSS dual-frequency solutions. This collaboration between Broadcom and OriginGPS has created the industry’s smallest dual-frequency module with ‘no compromise’ quality. For customers seeking an ultra-accurate GNSS solution in a compact form factor, the ORG4600-B01 fits the bill. The collaboration enables Broadcom to reach new markets, such as precision agriculture, security, children tracking and fleet management. OriginGPS is showcasing its products with real-life demos at MWC 2019, Los Angeles, Oct 22-24.last_img read more

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Pattaya gears up for another festival of rugby

first_imgThe weekend of 5th and 6th May 2012 will see the twelfth staging of the Pattaya 10’s Rugby Tournament, which is now known as the Amari Orchid Pattaya Chris Kays Memorial Tournament to perpetuate the memory of the former Pattaya Panthers captain, who was tragically killed in the Bali bombing in October 2002. Once again the tournament will be staged at The Horseshoe Point Resort, the newly expanded playing field is superb and with the support of Khun Chainarin Srifuengfung, Khun Girana and their staff, we are sure that everybody will love playing or watching the rugby in such attractive surroundings.  There will be an open 10’s Tournament for men and a Junior Division (Under 15’s), which is now in its fourth year, to enable the youngsters to display their skills and potential on a major stage.Pattaya 10’s rugby takes place at Horseshoe Point, May 5-6, 2012. There will be 16 teams in the main tournament and as usual this year there will be a very strong local influence led by the Old Bangkok Bangers and the newly invigorated Southerners!  We look forward to the return of The Royal Thai Police to defend their title and The Chiang Mai Suas, who were beaten in an epic Cup final for the second year running and they will be hoping that this will be their year … third time lucky?Former champions Thai Barbarians will be back and other new names include Surin Bold and the Watsrichan Old Boys.The overseas flavour will come from the Pau Ma Tei Barbarians a newly born touring side of the famous Valley RFC in Hong Kong and I am very pleased to report that following extensive chronometer retraining one of our favourite teams the Buccaneers from Australia have actually managed to book their tour for the correct weekend this year and we look forward to their return to the tournament.Of course crowd favourites The Bangkok Japanese will be looking to upset some of the more favoured teams.  There will not be such a strong academic influence this year as our tournament clashes with the University games so many University sides will be missing however Thammasat University will be making their first appearance at the tournament.Don’t underestimate the hosts who have been training hard on the field under new coach Des Halls and new Captain Adrien Simon, the leader of the French revolution!A tournament such as this could not be staged without the backing of the generous sponsors and this year the Amari Orchid Resort have become the tournament principal sponsor and the tournament will therefore be known as the Amari Orchid Pattaya Chris Kays Memorial Tournament.  There has also been significant support received from MBMG International, Jamesons and Cranes & Equipment Asia.In addition the Panthers would also like to thank other tournament sponsors Construction Cost Consultants, Bangkok Pattaya Hospital, Aus Group (formerly Modern Industries), CR Asia Ltd., Waste Management Services Thailand, Societe Generale de Surveillance, Jardine Shipping Services, Phoenix Pacific Inc., Icebreaker and Rhenus Logistics.Players and friends will get together on Friday night (4th May) for a “welcoming party and training session” at Jamesons the Irish Pub.  The action begins at 9am on Saturday and concludes around 6pm Sunday in what should be a memorable weekend festival of rugby – there will be almost 24 hours of entertaining rugby action during the two days.Note: the U 15’s tournament will be played from 16:00 to 19:00 on Saturday evening and will conclude between 08:00 and 10:00 on Sunday morning.“The weather is forecast to be fine and the venue is in perfect condition so we have no doubt that this will be the best tournament yet,” said Chairman of the Pattaya Panthers, Jim Howard.last_img read more

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Antonio Conte has been sacked by Chelsea

first_imgAntonio Conte has been sacked by Chelsea FC. According to Sky Sports, Blues owner Roman Abramovich has let the Italian coach know that his services will no longer be required at the club. Sky Sports also believe that former Napoli coach Maurizio Sarri is set to take over at the London club. Sarri left Napoli at the end of last season and is already negotiating his new contract with Chelsea, which they hope to announce as soon as they confirm Conte’s exit. Upd. at 17:51 CEST Conte has managed Chelsea for the last two seasons, winning a Premier League title and an FA Cup in his time there. Following last season’s campaign where the club finished outside of the Champions League places, Abramovich has made the decision to sack Conte. Antonio Conte, destituido como entrenador del Chelseacenter_img 12/07/2018 IN SPORT.ES Sport EN The appointment of Sarri could help Chelsea land Napoli’s Jorginho. The president of the Italian club, Aurelio De Laurentis, has previously revealed that the player prefers the London club over Manchester City.last_img read more

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Happy group opens its doors

first_imgAT the Berwick Seniors Club meeting on 4 June, apologies were made for Juliette Carrick, while June Murphy remains in…[To read the rest of this story Subscribe or Login to the Gazette Access Pass] Thanks for reading the Pakenham Berwick Gazette. Subscribe or Login to read the rest of this content with the Gazette Digital Access Pass subscription.last_img

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Weekend Galway Greyhound Stadium selections

first_imgRACE 1 at 19:52=TRAP 1 Ballygibbon Boy Friday – RACE 2 at 20:07=TRAP 2 Pinnacle Abbie RACE 3 at 20:22=TRAP 4 No time wasted RACE 4 at 20:37=TRAP 1 Crinkhill ChancerRACE 5 at 20:52=TRAP 6 Pierview Roisin RACE 6 at 21:07=TRAP 1 Pats Gold Dream RACE 7 at 21:22=TRAP 5 Springwell Sheba RACE 8 at 21:37=TRAP 4 Meansitall RACE 9 at 21:52=TRAP 4 Danmar Buddy RACE 10 at 22:07=TRAP 3 Glaise Blue (nap)Saturday RACE 1 at 19:52=TRAP 1 Crack on Billy RACE 2 at 20:07=TRAP 1 Bumblebee Reilly RACE 3 at 20:22=TRAP 6 Gleanrue Rocky RACE 4 at 20:37=TRAP 3 Corrandulla Brae RACE 5 at 20:52=TRAP 6 Kilbabbon Pedro RACE 6 at 21:07=TRAP 2 Bumblebee Ghost RACE 7 at 21:22=TRAP 4 Its my Saint RACE 8 at 21:37=TRAP 1 Rockmount Touche RACE 9 at 21:52=TRAP 1 Rockalong Aqua RACE 10 at 22:07=TRAP 1 Magical Cormie (nap)RACE 11 at 22:22=TRAP 4 Flyers Tony    print WhatsApp Facebook Twitter Emaillast_img read more

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Galway and Mayo ladies set to decide Connacht title in Limerick

first_imgprint WhatsApp Facebook Twitter Email The somewhat unusual setting of the Gaelic Grounds in Limerick will provide the backdrop to the latest chapter in the Galway/Mayo ladies football rivalry when both sides line out tomorrow in the Connacht Final replay at 4pm, ahead of the men’s round 4 qualifier at 7pm. The sides drew a fortnight ago in Castlebar after Mayo scored 3 second half goals to stun Galway and set up a replay at 4pm tomorrow. Tommy Devane spoke to Galway manager Timmy Rabbit ahead of the game…last_img read more

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