Getting the Cold Shoulder

first_imgThe New York Times: In “Jealous Guy,” John Lennon described his heart-aching insecurity as “shivering inside.” In “The Rain Song,” Led Zeppelin’s Robert Plant bemoaned, “I’ve felt the coldness of my winter.” And in “It Will Be Lonely This Christmas,” the ’70s band Mud crooned desperately, “It’ll be cold, so cold, without you to hold.”The poets were right about the chill of isolation and rejection — more, perhaps, than even they knew: when a person feels lonely or is being excluded by others, his or her skin literally becomes colder.For the past several years, our lab has been studying just how people respond to exclusion and other social interactions. In one recent experiment, published earlier this year in the journal Acta Psychologica, we asked dozens of students to participate in a simulated ball-tossing game with computer-generated cartoonlike figures called avatars.Research by the Purdue University psychologist Kip Williams, who programs these avatars to refrain from tossing the ball to certain human subjects, has shown that people feel bad when left out. But perhaps more striking is what happens to a person’s body temperature in such scenarios.Read the whole story: The New York Times More of our Members in the Media >last_img read more

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FSE orders EMUs

first_imgITALY: A €24·2m firm order for Polish manufacturer Newag to supply regional operator Ferrovie del Sud Est with six more three-car Impuls II electric multiple-units was finalised on December 7.In December 2015 FSE ordered an initial five of the Impuls II EMUs, designated ETR.322 in Italy, with an option for up to 10 more. The six additional units are scheduled to be delivered within 18 months.last_img

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Pitching once again the key in Cleveland

first_img Related TopicsCarlos CarrascoCleveland IndiansCody AndersonCorey KluberDanny SalazarJosh TomlinMLBPitching Paul Williams CLEVELAND — It is late February which means, while the NBA season is in full swing, Major League Baseball teams are at their respective spring training facilities preparing for opening day. It is an exciting time for all baseball fans and could be especially exciting for the Cleveland Indians. No, not because we just signed Juan Uribe, though that can’t hurt. It is an exciting time as a Cleveland fan because despite the all too familiar lack of off season moves, the Tribe returns arguably the best pitching staff in the majors. Cleveland ranked second in opponents batting average last year, giving up just a .237 clip. They were also second in strikeouts at 1407 on the season and pulled off the most complete games in the majors with 11 total. The staff, led by ex-cy young winning Corey Kluber, did this without great support from their offense or defense. Kluber, for example, had one the top WARS for a pitcher despite compiling an underwhelming record of 9-16. The Indians also saw two of the brightest young arms in the league, Danny Salazar and Carlos Carrasco, take big steps in the 2015 season. Salazar, after being eased in his first couple seasons, broke out last year. He compiled a 14-9 record, finished 19th in the entire MLB with 195 K’s and finished the season with a very solid 3.45 ERA. Carrasco, one of the most coveted young arms in the league, built off of his dominant finish in 2014 to put together a very impressive 2015. The 28 year old finished ninth in the MLB with 216 strikeouts while putting together a 14-12 record and a 3.63 ERA. All three of these pitchers could very well be the ace of a respective staff or a #2 arm at worst. In the fourth starter spot is Trevor Bauer, a tantalizing talent that has top of the rotation potential. With three solid arms in Josh Tomlin, Cody Anderson, and T.J. House fighting for the fifth spot, the Tribe has the top of the rotation talent and depth to carry a team into the playoffs.If injuries or under-performing does happen, which is a pretty good bet during a long baseball season, the Tribe should be in good position to withstand that. Also, with star Michael Brantley out to begin the year, Cleveland’s pitching becomes even more vital.With a solid bullpen to boot, Cleveland will once again rely on their pitching to be the catalyst for what should be a playoffs or bust 2016 campaign.If they can get a bit of help from the offense and continuous improvement defensively, the Indians could live up to last year’s lofty World Series predictions.last_img read more

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IndyCar Q&A: Diabetes not a deterrent for driver Charlie Kimball

first_imgCharlie Kimball promotes the Race with Insulin campaign for sponsor Novo Nordisk at Iowa Speedway. (Mike DiNovo, USA TODAY Sports)Charlie Kimball promotes the Race with Insulin campaign for sponsor Novo Nordisk at Iowa Speedway. (Mike DiNovo, USA TODAY Sports)Chip Ganassi Racing driver Charlie Kimball is happy to talk about how he has overcome the challenges of a diabetes diagnosis to establish himself as an IndyCar driver. But ultimately, he wants to be known for his results on the track. Kimball spoke about his career with Chris Jenkins, Special to USA TODAY Sports.Q: Obviously, a lot of people are familiar with you and your story as somebody who is racing with diabetes. Either physically or mentally, how would you describe the challenges you’ve overcome?Kimball: “I think the biggest challenge you deal with physically with diabetes is it’s something you deal with every moment of every day. For me, if I’m at the racetrack, or traveling for events for Novo Nordisk or even just at home, in the gym, in the office, I have to think about my blood sugar. I have to think about my nutrition. I have to think about taking my insulin with my Novo Nordisk flex pen, balancing my blood sugar so that I’m still healthy and able to do what I want in life. And then when I get to the racetrack, that becomes even more critical. It’s one more sensor for me to check in the car, but getting ready to climb in the car, I have to make sure that I’m preparing my body to the same level that the mechanics prepare the race car.”GRAHAM RAHAL: We’ve found ourselves in middle of championship raceQ: So you wrote a story in The Players’ Tribune that was really well done. It seems like this just sort of came out of nowhere when you were 22 years old. Is that how it went down?CK: “Yeah, it was a big shock. I had no family history of diabetes. I had very limited knowledge of what it was. In fact, when the doctor said, ‘You have diabetes,’ I went, ‘OK, great. What’s that?’ I really didn’t know, and one of the things about the Race with Insulin program is trying to drive awareness, and prove to people out there that yes, you may get diagnosed with diabetes, but at the same time, it’s not the end of the world. You can overcome that challenge and still live your dream. It was a total shock, really, when I went into the doctor’s office because I thought I was going in for a skin rash, an unrelated skin rash on my arm and just happened to mention that I’d been kind of thirsty. And that started a whole line of questioning.”Q: Initially, you were concerned that you wouldn’t be able to keep racing. But clearly, you’ve learned how to manage it. Today, does it affect you when you’re in the car?CK: “As I said, I think it’s one more sensor for me to look at. And I have to think about it and keep an eye on it for sure. But I have to keep an eye on lap time, I have to keep an eye on fuel load, I have to keep an eye on where we are in the race, and weather and wind conditions. It’s one more piece into the whole puzzle. And I think 20, 25 years ago, maybe I’m not able to get back in a race car, at least not safely, with diabetes. But the modern technologies, the meters, the continuous glucose monitors, the insulin, the delivery devices like my flex pen, one-touch device, all those things, when they’re put into a program that I developed with my doctors and with the race team, mean that when I get in the car, I’m just like all the other drivers. I’m out there to win.”Q: For people who don’t know, you actually have a sensor that’s wired into you and a readout on the steering wheel? CK: “Correct. I wear a sensor on my body and it transmits through to the display and that display plugs into the data system. On my electronic dash, I have speed, lap time, rpm, oil pressure, blood sugar, water temperature, gear. Quite literally, my car and body data, right there together.”Q: And your father is an engineer, and he designed a device that helps you switch between water and orange juice?CK: “I have two drink bottles in the car. Most IndyCar drivers have a drink system so they can stay hydrated throughout a race, especially a hot race like we had last weekend at Iowa, where it’s 90 degrees, 90 percent humidity, you have a three-layer fireproof suit on and wrestling 650 horsepower with no power steering, you tend to lose some weight and water, so you try to stay hydrated as much as possible. My system is a little different in that I have two drink bottles. The water, and as you mentioned, orange juice. The orange juice has a lot of fast-acting carbohydrates in it, so if my blood sugar is getting low, or lower than I’d like, during the course of a race, I can flip a valve that my dad designed and we got 3-D printed, mounted right on my seat belt, out of that valve the tube runs right into my helmet, just like a really long straw. Depending on what my body needs, I can give it what I need to I can focus on driving. Now, knock on wood, I’ve never needed the orange juice during a race to keep my blood sugar where I want it. The preparation that I do before I get in the car has meant that I’ve never needed that backup plan.”Q: And does your crew have a pen available? And I’d imagine the safety team might, too?CK: “The safety team is well aware of my diabetes, my condition, and they have all the medical devices they need. And my team, if need be, if my blood sugar got too high to the point where I was affected competitively, we have a plan where my inside front tire changer would get me an injection of insulin if I needed it. So he would change the front tire, turn around, grab the insulin pen, give me an injection. Having said that, a typical IndyCar pit stop, four tires, 18 and a half gallons of fuel, is done in eight, eight and a half seconds. So to spend the extra time to give me an injection would lose me ground on the racetrack. So I do everything I can to not need that. And at the moment, it’s all gone to plan, and if you’ll pardon the pun, everything’s stayed on track.”Q: For those who don’t know, your sponsor is a company that specializes in diabetes care. Now, it’s no secret that sponsorship money is hard to come by. In an odd way, did having this disease actually help your career?CK: “You talk about Novo Nordisk being a sponsor, but for me, they’re a partner. I knew who they were and I’ve used their products since the day I was diagnosed in 2007. And we’re now seven years into a partnership. They’ve stood by me from Indy Lights and moved up to IndyCar with me, formed a partnership with Chip Ganassi Racing to run the 83 car. And it’s so much more than just the racetrack. Being able to use their resources, their field sales team, to talk to different people around the country. Be it families, be it kids with diabetes,  doctors, health care assistants, so that they have a first-hand anecdote for health care professionals to take to their patients when they get diagnosed. And for other families to encourage them to help their family members with diabetes to live their dreams. So partnering on diabetes has been great, because it’s allowed me to live my dream and fuel my passion on the racetrack. But at the same time, it’s been very fulfilling to be able to tell my story across the country.”(Greg Hester, USA TODAY Sports)(Greg Hester, USA TODAY Sports)Q: Meeting families, and kids, is that rewarding?CK: “I’m full of bad jokes, and my favorite one is that getting diagnosed is a speed bump but not a road block in my career path. And yes, when I get the opportunity to meet those families and meet those kids and look them in the eye and say, welcome to the cool kids’ club. You have diabetes, I have diabetes. I drive race cars. What do you want to do in life? If it’s playing in the major leagues in baseball, or football. Two-time Super Bowl champion Kendall Simmons is another ambassador for Novo Nordisk. He’s another example. If you want to play football, you can do that with diabetes. If you want to drive a race car, if you want to be in the boardroom and be a Fortune 500 CEO. When I look them in the eye and tell them that, and see their world expand and open up in front of them is extremely fulfilling. I think it’s made me a better athlete and a better racing driver. Because it’s given me balance. If I finish first on the racetrack, or don’t have a great day and finish 21st, the fact that I’m out and successfully competing is a victory for a lot of these families out there and for a lot of people within the diabetes community.”Q: I’d imagine you want to be known as a racer, not just a racer with diabetes. What are your long-term career goals, and what do you see developing now that is getting you toward those goals?CK: “The biggest thing for me in terms of being seen as a racing driver first and diabetes, having it along for the ride, is my results on the racetrack. If the team and I can work together to produce good results, that’s what people will want to talk about. And the cool anecdote alongside that, the sidebar, so to speak, is that I have diabetes and have overcome that challenge. But I’m a competitor. I didn’t want to be a driver with diabetes that was just getting a participation medal. I wanted to be out there competing for race wins and fighting through the field of the best open-wheel racers in the world, or at least in North America. So to be able to do that, and get the results, that should drive the conversation. And long-term goals, people have asked me if I’d like to try other forms of racing, and I have a lot left to accomplish in the Verizon IndyCar Series. Picking up third place at the Indianapolis 500 this year was a great result. But at the same time, as soon as I got out of the car, I was eager to go back and do it again and do what I needed to do to drink milk in victory lane. Those are the goals, and to be in championship contention at the end of the year, that’s what we’re aiming for. I think we have all the pieces, and Novo Nordisk Chip Ganassi Racing has been great in helping me get to this point. We just need to put those pieces together, put a full season together.”Q: Couldn’t get through this week without asking about the new driver comment policy. Do you have any thoughts?CK: “So I made a flippant remark at (Indy 500) media day this year to one of the journalists after Marshawn Lynch’s Super Bowl media day, I’m just here so I don’t get fined. And that made everybody laugh, and it was good to pull that out. But honestly, I can see both sides of the coin there. The energy, the enthusiasm, and the drama and tension of IndyCar racing is part of what makes it what it is. At the same time, we need to grow this sport. And all of the drivers, the series, the teams, even sponsors and partners are invested in IndyCar racing. So the more we can all work together the grow it, and highlight drama and rivalries, but at the same time do it in a respectful way that grows the sport. Is that a knife edge? Probably. And is the new policy meant to limit drivers’ passion? I don’t think so. But is it meant to help grow the sport? Probably.”Charlie Kimball finished third at the 2015 Indianapolis 500. (Andrew Weber, USA TODAY Sports).Charlie Kimball finished third at the 2015 Indianapolis 500. (Andrew Weber, USA TODAY Sports).SPEED ROUNDQ: Favorite track you’ve ever driven on?CK: “My favorite racetrack of all time has got to be Spa in Belgium. Going through Eau Rouge and Blanchimont and La Source, there’s so many corners in one track, every lap is a blast. I love racing at Monza, Watkins Glen and Road America are still highlights. On the current IndyCar schedule, I think Mid-Ohio, probably because I won there in 2013, is one of my favorites as well.”Q: One track you’ve never raced on that you’d love to try?CK: “The full LeMans circuit. The endurance circuit at LeMans. And Bathurst. Two big endurance races. I hope to one day get the opportunity to race the 24 Hours of LeMans and the 12 Hours of Bathurst.”Q: First street car you ever owned?CK: “In high school, I drove my dad’s car, so I never owned that. But when I moved to Europe, I bought about a 10-year-old BMW 318i, and it was great. That thing went all over Europe with me and lasted really well. Now, I’m fortunate with the Team Chevy deal to drive a nice Silverado pickup. I like to do DIY, so it’s nice to go to the hardware store and be able to fit a four by eight piece of plywood in the back.”Q: Favorite city in the world?CK: “My favorite place to visit in the world is Barcelona. The only place outside of the U.S. where I would want to live would be Northern Italy. I love Italy, and spent a little time there as a kid and it was great. But for a long weekend or vacation, the people, the art, the food, the weather, the racetrack, Barcelona is always top of the list.”Q: If you weren’t racing, what would you do for a living?CK: “I’ve always thought that if I couldn’t drive cars for a living, I wanted to be a fighter pilot. But with diabetes there are some additional restrictions there. But at the same time, I’ve fallen in love with racing. If I couldn’t drive cars, I’d like to design cars like my dad did, and be a mechanical engineer and still be at the racetrack one way or another.”Q: So your dad actually designed race cars?CK: “That’s right. In fact, the reason I run the number 83 car is because 1983 was Chip Ganassi’s best finish as a driver at the Indy 500, driving a car that my dad helped design. So it was important to recognize Chip’s history as a driver and my dad’s history as an engineer when I started in IndyCar racing.”last_img read more

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Post Office campaigners to deliver message to Letterkenny

first_imgA group of community activists from Gweedore are planning a protest in Letterkenny in a bid to save their local post offices.The campaigners are bringing their action to Letterkenny on Saturday 8th December after local protests failed to save several services in West Donegal.The protest will be staged at the main Letterkenny Post Office at 11am. Independent Councillor Mícheál Cholm Mac Giolla Easbuig said that it was intolerable for any community to put up with what An Post is doing to rural Donegal at the moment.He said: “We have already lost four post offices in Burtonport, Dunfanaghy, Gort a’ Choirce and An Bun Beag and we are awaiting the result of a review of the decision to close the post office in Bun na Leaca. “On other areas, like Churchill, Quigley’s Point, Ballymagen, Ballyliffin, Burnfoot, Culdaff, Culkeeny, Dunaff, Dunkineely, Kildrum, Meenaneary and Rossnakill, post offices are either closing down or are threatened with imminent closure. This is death by a thousand cuts.”Mac Giolla Easbuig says the post office issue is just a symptom of a ‘greater disease’ affecting the whole county, and rural areas in particular. He said: “Since the foundation of the State, successive governments led by both Fianna Fáil and Fine Gael, have starved Donegal of infrastructure such as hospitals, railways, motorways, broadband and proper electrical and gas networks. “Some rural areas become inaccessible during the winter because of lack of funding to the County Council. The list is endless. “It is time communities came out and took a stand and fight for their survival because government policies are killing communities throughout rural areas, not just in Donegal, but throughout the country.”“We were advised by establishment politicians that the only way to fight post office closures was to make submissions to the review body. This approach has patently failed and it is now left to the communities to fight their own cause.”Mac Giolla Easbuig added that people from other rural areas will be welcome to join campaigners from Gweedore on 8th December. Post Office campaigners to deliver message to Letterkenny was last modified: November 30th, 2018 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:Gweedoreletterkennypost officeslast_img read more

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YouTube Roundup

first_imgShare This!Did you know that TouringPlans has an incredibly popular YouTube page? Okay, a YouTube page anyway. Well we do, and I am here to give you a few examples of videos that you can find. They’re like Epcot: entertaining, educational, and a little old and run down…wait, that last one’s just me.This week we’ll take a look at some recent videos and one very fun older one.First up is Angela Dahlgren watching people make delicious treats. Don’t watch this one if you’re hungry:Next is me doing one of my favorite Harry Potter-nerd things…riding the Hogwarts Express.And lastly it was one of my favorite videos to shoot because a) it includes several members of the TouringPlans team and b) we get to try a bunch of snacks.Check back next week for more and make sure you subscribe to our page at https://www.youtube.com/TouringPlanslast_img read more

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New names for Cape Town footbridges

first_img26 June 2015Cape Town’s Naming Committee has recommended names for seven footbridges crossing Nelson Mandela Boulevard and Rhodes Drive to the mayor for decision.Tuan Guru, Ingrid Jonker, |a!kunta, Dawid Kruiper, Father John Oliver, Taliep Petersen and Father Basil van Rensburg are the names on the short list, released on 23 June, following a public participation process.The chairperson of the committee, Brett Herron, said the naming of these footbridges was an opportunity to commemorate these people and events that influenced the character and culture of Cape Town.“The naming of public spaces, bridges and roads, among others, is pivotal in building a shared community across different cultural, social and economic groups,” he said. “We want to create a city where residents feel acknowledged, heard and valued and this is why we have invested so much time and effort in the public participation processes.”Leaving a legacy|a!kunta, or Klaas Stoffel, was the first contributor to the Wilhelm Bleek and Lucy Lloyd Archive of /xam and !kun texts. Working with Bleek and Lloyd, he contributed some narratives and a large number of words and sentences to the archive to help preserve the traditional language.Guru, or Imam Abdullah Ibn Qadhu Abdus Salaam, a prince from Tidore in the Trinate Islands and a descendant of the Sultan of Morocco, is regarded as the father of Islam in South Africa. In 1780, the Dutch invaders banished him to the Cape, where he was imprisoned on Robben Island for 12 years until 1792. While incarcerated, he wrote several copies of the Holy Qur’an from memory, possibly the first Qur’an in South Africa.Jonker was an iconic Afrikaans poet who committed suicide by drowning at the age of 31 in Sea Point. Her poems, written in her mother tongue, have been translated into other languages. Nelson Mandela read Jonker’s poem Die Kind (The Child) in full during his inaugural State of the Nation address to Parliament in May 1994.In commenting on the poem, he said: “In this glorious vision, she instructs that our endeavours must be about the liberation of the woman, the emancipation of the man and the liberty of the child”. Of Jonker herself, Mandela said: “She was both a poet and a South African. She was both an Afrikaner and an African. She was both an artist and a human being. In the midst of despair, she celebrated hope. Confronted by death, she asserted the beauty of life.”Kruiper was a traditional healer and leader of the Khomani San in the Kalahari. He spoke for the rights of indigenous people to the United Nations in 1994, and was instrumental in the successful land claim for the San in South Africa, culminating in the restoration of 40 000 hectares of land in 1999.Father John was an Anglican priest from District Six who died in 2013. He founded the Cape Town Interfaith Initiative. As a community leader, he worked to bring about unity. “Father Oliver was one of the city’s distinguished religious leaders who used the gospel to mediate wherever divisions existed in different communities,” said Mayor Patricia de Lille following his death.“He played an instrumental role uniting religious leaders in the city and province through the formation of the Western Cape Religious Leaders Forum.”Petersen was a singer, composer and director of a number of popular musicals. He worked with David Kramer, with whom he won the Laurence Olivier Award, the highest honour in British theatre.“With Kramer focusing on lyrics and Petersen on melodies, they fused their respective unfinished Cape Town-inspired projects to create District Six: The Musical, an acclaimed meditation on the history of the region’s black culture,” writes music website, All Music. “The production was a hit, and a series of like-minded musicals followed, among themFairyland, Crooners and Klop Klop. Petersen and Kramer’s biggest international success was 1998’s Kat and the Kings, the first Cape Town musical performed on London’s West End and New York’s Broadway. It was nominated for a Tony Award and earned the 1999 Olivier Award for Best New Musical.”Father Basil was a Catholic priest who gained international recognition for his fight against the forced removals in District Six. He mobilised public opinion against the mass removals, writing to newspapers and holding public meetings. During apartheid, a “Friends of District Six organisation was set up, attracting international media interest, much to the government’s embarrassment and annoyance”, wrote UK newspaper, The Guardian.The processThe seven names have been recommended to De Lille for approval and, if supported, they will be recommended to the city council for a final decision.According to the city, the recommendation follows an initial public participation process conducted in November 2013 and February 2014, during which the public was asked to propose names. More than 2 000 name proposals were received.These were whittled down to 638 and the final seven were recommended for the concluding round of public participation, which ended last month.SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

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Sportscover Australia ‘Underwriting Agency of the Year’

first_imgSportscover Australia has been named as Underwriting Agency of the Year at the 2009 Australia and New Zealand Insurance Industry Awards. This was the inaugural award for this category, sponsored by Lloyd’s. Murray Anderson, CEO of Sportscover Australia said, “We are very proud to have won this award against some stiff competition. It is a great tribute to the whole team; our staff, our broker network and our clients, because without their fantastic support we would not have been able to grow so significantly over the past 23 years.” Sportscover Australia is a specialist sports and leisure underwriting agency which was originally established by Peter Nash in 1986. Since then, Sportscover has grown to become a worldwide sports and leisure insurance services group which includes a Lloyd’s managing agent (Sportscover Underwriting Limited) and a Lloyd’s syndicate (3334 SCS). Sportscover Australia continues to operate as an underwriting agency with authority to write business on behalf of the Sportscover syndicate. Sportscover’s Chairman, Peter Nash, was also one of three finalists in the Insurance Leader of the Year Award. Joan Fitzpatrick, CEO, the Australian and New Zealand Institute of Insurance and Finance (the Institute) said, “On behalf of the expert judging panel, I wholeheartedly congratulate the winners of this year’s awards on their tremendous achievement. Being named as a winner is no ordinary feat, competition is always fierce and with a record number of submissions the calibre this year was incredibly high.” She added, “We are supremely proud of the winners and their innovation, high professional standards, customer service focus and industry leadership. The Insurance Industry Awards are a great opportunity for our industry to take pride in its achievements and excellence. I know that each winner will be extremely proud of their success.” The winners of each category were announced at the Insurance Industry Awards Gala at the Parkside Ballroom, Sydney Convention and Exhibition Centre, on Thursday 30 July. Australian owned Sportscover is one of the world’s leading sports and leisure insurance services groups with offices in Melbourne, Sydney, London, and Toronto. Using a worldwide broker network, Sportscover specialises in accident, liability, property and contingency insurances for sport and leisure. As a Lloyd’s syndicate, SCS 3334 benefits from Lloyd’s market rating and is the only A rated dedicated sports and leisure insurer in the world. Sportscover’s main underwriting operations comprise Sportscover Underwriting Ltd, Syndicate 3334, Sportscover Australia Pty Ltd, Sportscover Europe Ltd. Sutton-Sportscover Ltd, Sportscover Insurance Ltd, SCI Capital Ltd. Thanks to Martin Kelly for providing the article content.Related Filesmedia-release-2009-07-31-sportscover-insurance-institute-award-winner-pdflast_img read more

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Watch: UNC’s Brice Johnson Finds Out About All-American Selection, Jersey Honor

first_imgBrice Johnson on the couch finds out about All American selection and jersey honor.North Carolina senior forward Brice Johnson was named a First Team All-American today by the United States Basketball Writers Association. As a result, he will have his jersey put up in the rafters at the Dean Dome as part of the program’s tradition of honoring All-Americans.The Tar Heels put out a very cool feature showing Johnson finding out about his All-American status from head coach Roy Williams, as his teammates cheered him. The video goes on to include Williams talking about Johnson and Johnson saying how much the honor means to him. If you bleed Carolina blue, this is a must-watch. Watch @bjohnson_23 find out the 1st team All-American selection means his jersey will be in Smith Center rafters! https://t.co/WCZJjF1KBS— Carolina Basketball (@UNC_Basketball) March 14, 2016last_img read more

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