Istria declared the best olive growing region in the world!

first_imgIn the seventh edition of the Flos Olei guide, published in 2016, Istria achieved exceptional success! In this, the only world guide through extra virgin olive oils, 50 Istrian olive growers and oil mills are included, so Istria has risen to the top of the list for the first time in terms of quality and representation. the highest quality olive growing regions of the world!Flos Olei, a bilingual Italian-English guide to the world’s top extra virgin olive oils, highly esteemed in the world of gastronomy, was published in 2016 in the seventh edition in which Istria with its oils won alone top of the world rankings.With this award, Istrian olive growers receive a large free advertisement, recognition for all their long-term efforts, as well as a great promotional trump card as the best olive growing region in the world. “Every olive grower wishes they could find themselves in this guide. The guide objectively values ​​autochthonous differences, and Istria really has them, banker, buža, carbonaca, because our producers have preserved them and used them with quality.” stand out from the Tourist Board of the Istrian County for HRTPhoto: FB Chiavalon Extra Virgin Olive OilThe highest number of points achieved by olive growers in the Flos Olei guide in 2016 is 98, out of a possible 100. A very high score of 97, the only one from Istria has Olea BB from Rabac, and 4 more producers won a dizzying 96 or 95 points: Family Ipša, Stancija Meneghetti, OPG Matteo Belci and Tonin and Chiavalon Franco Basiaco, Giancarlo Zigante and Enio Zubin.One of the prominent olive growers that has been on the Flos Olei guide list for years is olive oil Sandia Chiavalona from Vodnjan, is one of the fifteen best olive oils in the world, and the most awarded olive oil in Croatia, who points out that this is a great recognition for Istria and excellent branding of Istria as a region of quality olive oil. “This is a great recognition for Istria as a region, as well as for us olive growers. When one region is profiled as a region of quality oil then oil becomes the motive of arrival and guests come only because of the oil. It is much better and better when an entire region is declared the best than individual olive growers’ awards. “Chiavalon pointed out and added that for the last eight years Chiavalon oil has been in the Flos Olei guide and that they achieve high points through continuous quality.” Every year we have more and more guests coming to our tasting room and I am sure that this award will only increase the demand for our oils.Chiavalon concludedThe guide evaluates and describes olive oils from 49 countries from five continents. On 864 pages, in addition to rated olive growers and oil mills, the guide provides information on the history, culture and production of the countries from which they come. Enrollment in Flos Olei, and with it great successes, began in 2005 and since then Istrian olive oils have been constantly confirming their quality. List of all listed olive growers in the Flos Olei guide look herelast_img read more

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What it looks like when the hosts themselves take the fate of tourism into their own hands – Ingenious

first_imgHave you ever heard of a small tourist place, Medici?I haven’t until a few days ago and I have to admit that I immediately fell in love with Medić at first and I hope that I will have the opportunity to experience him live as soon as possible. At first I was thrilled by the story, the story I will tell you now…Namely, Medići is a small tourist resort in Central Dalmatia located on the Omis Riviera, only 11 km from Omis and 36 km from Split. Peace, quiet, few tourists and beautiful sea – ideal for a real vacation for those who do not like crowds and mass tourism, and yet close to Omis and Split.Why are the Medici special and unique?The answer is simple – because of the people. Local people who took the fate of tourism in Medići into their own hands and made something special and unique in the history of our tourism. Most of the hosts in the family accommodation in Medići decided to make a promotional film on their own initiative, which they financed themselves, and to make the story even better, they were the actors in the video themselves.Watch the video 🙂Ingenious, isn’t it?In the video, they are not actors, but local people who live in Medići and are engaged in tourism as hosts in family accommodation. The video shows what it is, no hidden motives, no fake smiles… What you see is what you get – 100% indigenous, 100% Medici.We were thinking about what we could do to promote our small place so that everyone in the local community would benefit and so we came up with the idea to shoot a promotional video about our place points out Frane Medić, one of 30 hosts in family accommodation in Medići. ” The initiative started from all the locals, ie the landlords, and we financed everything ourselves. Since I personally took over the organization of video recording I can say that it is quite a complicated and demanding job. The video shows all the local people living in Medići, we didn’t pay any actors or extras. “It simply came to our notice then FB page Visit Medici which they run themselves, and as they set off we can obviously expect more great tourist stories.Medici does not offer much tourism, except for the sun, the sea and people. Hosts who are the essence of tourism itself and great hosts who will tell you their indigenous stories. They take you fishing in their boat, and then you bake the fish you caught together. Could the experience be better? Medici is a place with soul and heart, and I constantly emphasize that we have to be what we are and tell indigenous stories because tourists want to see, taste and experience just that.I hope that this inspiring and great tourist story will encourage some other small places to make their own story, indigenous story and tell it to guests.Visit the Medici, these people deserve it.last_img read more

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Be a part of the Zlarin Millennium Photography

first_imgZlarin Tourist Board We invite all locals, friends and fans of Zlarin to 30.07.2016. starting at 18:30 p.m., they are participating in a unique event – taking a millennium photo.The last such photo in which all the inhabitants of Zlarin took part was Tijat’s birthday. Now the Facebook group Tijat u <3 and the photographer Šime Strikoman want to take a millennial photo in the shape of a coral necklace in honor of our Dadi. How could he not when it was his long-awaited and unfulfilled wish.For the purposes of filming, we will have a special guest - our beloved Tijat, who will translate all those interested from Šibenik for free and return to the city after posing on the Zlarin waterfront. The gathering is at 18:30 p.m. when the deployment of participants begins. The only conditions for participation are that everyone comes in red T-shirts and pre-enrolls in the office of the Zlarin Tourist Board.The photo shoot itself will take place at 19pm from a helicopter and we all need to be ready. Soon after taking the photo, you will also be able to buy the Coral Millennium Photo! Except for those who come from Šibenik, on July 29.07, at 18 pm we will have a 10 minute rehearsal on the Riva. Departure of Tijat (not related to the regular line) on 30.07. from Šibenik at 18:30, and return at 19:45.last_img read more

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New tourist catalog of Baška presented

first_imgIn addition to the strong promotion of Baška as an unavoidable place for all lovers of natural beauty, history, culture and active life, we have refreshed the look of the catalog that best combines the diverse offer of our place, say the Tourist Board of Baška.The interior of the catalog is adorned with a multitude of photographs showing all the charms and beauties of Baška, as well as the entire tourist offer from cultural to content for active holidays. You can download the new promotional tourist catalog at the Tourist Information Center of the Tourist Board of Baška at the address Kralja Zvonimira 114, during working hours or you can download it at this linkIn the first nine months, a total of 158.532 arrivals were made in Baša (2% more than in 2015) and 937.252 overnight stays (4% more). Compared to 2015, domestic guests made 5.610 arrivals (19% less) and 25.839 overnight stays (20% less). The share of domestic guests in total arrivals and overnight stays for the period January-September is 3%. Foreign guests realized 152.922 arrivals (3% more) and 911.413 overnight stays (5% more), which makes a share of 97%.The largest number of arrivals was realized in private accommodation 71.120, followed by the number of arrivals in campsites 42.989 and in hotels 40.684 arrivals. 2.665 arrivals were recorded in resorts and 1.074 arrivals in campsites. In terms of markets, the largest number of overnight stays was recorded by Germans, our traditionally most loyal guests, with 213.574 overnight stays (3% more) and Austrians with 144.228 overnight stays (1% more), while Italians took third place with 97.802 overnight stays (11% more) and Slovenes are in fourth place with 90.511 overnight stays (9% less) and the Czechs with 90.419 overnight stays (index 100) hold the fifth place.The increase in overnight stays was recorded from the following markets: Poland with 63.662 overnight stays or + 28%, Slovakia 59.950 (4% more), Hungary with 44.868 overnight stays, which is an increase of 19%, and Sweden with 26.226 overnight stays or + 5% and the Netherlands with 14.616 overnight stays (16% more).TOURIST CATALOG TZ BAŠKAlast_img read more

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Your sleep becomes more sensitive to caffeine as you grow older: study

first_imgFor their study, the researchers had 22 healthy 20–30 year old adults (the young group) and 25 healthy 40–60 year old adults (the middle-age group) sleep at a chronobiology laboratory for two nonconsecutive nights. After arriving at the lab, the participants consumed either a low dose of caffeine, a high dose of caffeine, or a placebo three hours before their normal bedtime.Throughout the course of the study, participants also recorded their sleep and waking behaviors on a daily basis, and kept a daily log of the amount of caffeinated products they consumed. “Compared to that of the young, the sleep of older adults was generally more sensitive to the effects of a higher dose of caffeine,” the researchers said.Caffeine increased the length of time it took for the participants to fall sleep, shortened total sleep time and reduced sleep efficiency. But the researchers found that these effects were more pronounced in the middle-aged group.“The effects of 200 mg of caffeine were similar across both age groups, but the 400 mg dose of caffeine increased sleep latency, shortened total sleep time and the absolute amount of stage 2 sleep, and reduced sleep efficiency more extensively in older compared to younger adults,” Robillard and her colleagues wrote. Share LinkedIn Share on Twitter Emailcenter_img If you’ve passed the age of 40, you should be extra careful about consuming caffeine before bed. New research has discovered that the sleep of older adults is more sensitive to the effects of a higher dose of caffeine.Caffeine elicits wakefulness by acting as a competitive antagonist at adenosine receptors in the brain. In other words, caffeine blocks the effects of adenosine, a neuromodulator that promotes sleepiness by reducing neuron activity.“Surprisingly, the age-related modulation of caffeine effects on the sleep–wake cycle has received little attention,” lead researcher Rébecca Robillard and her colleagues wrote in their study, which was published online in the Journal of Psychopharmacology. Pinterest Share on Facebooklast_img read more

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Why the ‘cool factor’ won’t lure college grads to your city

first_imgA new nationwide study reveals that the kind of cities that attract college graduates has changed since the 1990s.In the 1990s, grads were moving to cities with fast-growing “smart” industries in fields like high tech, the study found. But since 2000, with a less vibrant national economy, college graduates are flocking toward the biggest cities with the biggest labor markets and the best chances of landing a job.In fact, the effect of city population size in attracting college grads was nearly four times as large in the 2000s as it was in the 1990s, said Michael Betz, co-author of the study and assistant professor of human sciences at The Ohio State University. Share on Facebook Pinterest Email LinkedIncenter_img “In the 90s, when the economy was booming, college grads just moved to places that were fast-growing, figuring they could find a job,” Betz said.“But post-2000, with the national economy not doing so well, graduates have become more risk-averse. They’re moving to the larger cities with more potential jobs.”These trends apply mostly to people graduating with a bachelor’s degree, Betz said. Those earning graduate or professional degrees aren’t as drawn as other grads to larger cities.Betz conducted the study with Mark Partridge, a professor of agricultural, environmental and development economics at Ohio State, and Belal Fallah of Palestine Polytechnic University.Their results are published online in the journal Papers in Regional Science and will appear in a future print edition.The findings have important implications for the many cities that try to attract more college graduates to live in their areas, Betz said.“Local policymakers often believe they can lure more college grads by becoming a hub of high-tech industry or creating a cool arts district,” Betz said.“That’s not what grads are looking for, at least since the downturn in the economy. They’re interested in moving somewhere that has a lot of job opportunities, and that generally means a larger city.”For their analysis, the researchers combined data from several publicly available datasets, along with industry-level employment data for 358 Metropolitan Statistical Areas, as defined by the U.S. Census Bureau.They compared migration patterns of college-educated workers from 1990 to 2000 with patterns from 2000 to 2010.Several studies examining the migration of college grads in the 1990s found that cities with initially larger shares of college grads were most successful in attracting more grads.“It seemed like a case of the rich getting richer,” Betz said. But this new study found that it was actually certain “smart” industries – ones that hired greater-than-average shares of college grads – that were attracting more grads to certain cities.“So new college grads weren’t necessarily attracted to these cities just because they had more college-educated residents like themselves – they were following these fast-growing industries.”All of that changed in the 2000s, though, after two recessions left a weak national economy. At that point, college graduates weren’t flocking to cities based on the types of industry or jobs available. They just wanted big cities with lots of potential jobs, Betz said.Betz said it is not surprising that many cities seek to market their areas as great places to live for new college graduates.“College-educated graduates are associated with many positive economic outcomes for cities, so leaders try to find ways to attract them,” he said.But these results suggest city leaders shouldn’t believe that bringing trendy high-tech industries to town or building arts and culture communities will necessarily help their cause.“These kinds of things may not hurt, but they’re not what college grads are mainly looking for in a place to live,” he said.Cities can’t do much to control their size – which was the main factor attracting grads in this study. But Betz said city leaders can work to create a stable and, if possible, growing labor market that shows grads they could find a good job if they move to their city. Share Share on Twitterlast_img read more

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Psychologists are known for being liberal – but is that because they understand how people think?

first_imgLinkedIn Share Email Share on Facebook Share on Twittercenter_img Pinterest Is the field of social psychology biased against political conservatives? There has been intense debate about this question since an informal poll of over 1,000 attendees at a social psychology meeting in 2011 revealed the group to be overwhelmingly liberal.Formal surveys have produced similar results, showing the ratio of liberals to conservatives in the broader field of psychology is 14-to-1.Since then, social psychologists have tried to figure out why this imbalance exists. The primary explanation offered is that the field has an anticonservative bias. I have no doubt that this bias exists, but it’s not strong enough to push people who lean conservative out of the field at the rate they appear to be leaving.I believe that a less prominent explanation is more compelling: learning about social psychology can make you more liberal. I know about this possibility because it is exactly what happened to me.‘Homo libertus’ becomes a social psychologistI used to be a libertarian. I believed that protecting individual liberties was the highest purpose of law, and that the government should have no role in shaping people’s behavior. These views tended to align with Republican positions more than Democratic ones on issues such as gun control, environmental policy and treatment for addiction.I believed that people should have every opportunity to make their own choices, and should bear the full responsibility of the consequences of those choices.The libertarian worldview assumes that each of us is a homo libertus, a creature that acts with its full mental capacity all the time, reasoning through every decision in terms of its complete implications for the individual’s values and well-being.A perfect libertarian society wouldn’t need laws to protect the environment, for example, because each homo libertus would consider the impact on the environment of every decision that he or she makes. Society’s care for the environment would be reflected automatically in the choices of its citizens.One of social psychology’s most powerful insights is that humans are not homo liberti. Thinking about ourselves in this way is alluring, but also mistaken. We are not radical individuals; we are social creatures. We do not think logically at all times; we take shortcuts. We do not always consider the future. And even when we do, we are biased by the present context.Learning about social psychology, about how people actually make important choices, made me aware of the critical role that society plays, through laws and other means, in enabling us to fulfill our values and ideals. This realization pushed me to be decidedly more liberal than I was before.It’s not that studying psychology made me a bleeding heart, but that studying psychology gave me a better understanding of why people do what they do. Three topics in particular that shaped the evolution of my political views from libertarian to liberal: gun control, charity and self-control.There are many others, but these three most vividly illustrate the flaws in the homo libertus assumption.Case study #1: gun controlLearning about social psychology first changed my views about gun control. Homo libertus would follow first principles when deciding to use force: only out of self-defense, and only when there is a real threat of harm.But we now know that people’s perceptions of threat are a blend of objective reality and subjective interpretation. The experience of threat is informed by our snap judgments of the situation and our preconceptions about the potential attacker.For instance, people are more likely to shoot an unarmed black man than an unarmed white man. This is true of just about everyone, including African Americans, highly trained police officers, and people who are horrified at the thought of having a racial bias and motivated to be egalitarian. Also, the mere presence of a gun primes people for aggression, making violence more likely even when there is no rational basis for it.Implicit biases, including ones that go against our overt beliefs, can sneak into life-and-death decisions. This knowledge convinced me that giving even the most well-intentioned people total liberty with guns leads to outcomes that violate equality and justice.Case study #2: CharityDecisions about charitable giving are another example. Government aid to foreign countries is unnecessary, I used to think, because if people care about what happens outside the US, then they’ll give money directly to those in need.It turns out that we humans often have noble, charitable intentions, but we behave in strange and irrational ways when it comes to actual giving.For example, people give more money to save the life of one person who is vividly portrayed than to save hundreds of people who are depicted as statistics, a phenomenon known as the identifiable victim effect.Even when victims are equally identifiable, we tend to give less money when there are more of them. If a homo libertus cared enough to donate $X to one person, then he would donate at least that much to two people. The fact that real humans act in the opposite way made me realize that formalizing our support for those in need through foreign aid and similar policies is a logical way for people in our society to ensure that we act on our charitable intentions.Case study #3: Self-control and bad behaviorA final example of how social psychology made me more liberal comes from my own research on self-control.The libertarian view places the responsibility for choices and their consequences entirely on the individual. We have the right to engage in unhealthy behaviors such as cigarette-smoking or excessive eating, and the downstream problems arising from those behaviors are ours alone.However, unlike homo libertus, many factors outside of our control interfere with our ability to quit smoking or eat healthfully. Simply being poor reduces self-control. Being abused or neglected as a child reduces self-control and increases the risk of substance use as an adult. In a perfect world, we would all have sufficient self-control to align our intentions neatly with our actions.But in this world, where we do not, the fact that some people are saddled with deficits whose seeds were sown before birth undermines the libertarian assumption that people are capable, autonomous decision-makers.These are just three examples, but I think they illustrate well the ways that the idealized folk psychology that underpinned my libertarian politics collapsed in the face of social psychological evidence.You might think this means I think people aren’t responsible for their behavior, but actually I just think that we have a different kind of responsibility. The fact that we’re not always in total control of our immediate actions means that we have even greater responsibility to construct our situations and our institutions in alignment with our deep values.As I continue to study social psychology, I increasingly believe in the importance of policies that recognize and accommodate the realities of human psychology, which necessarily insert certain roles for government in our everyday lives. And I bet I’m not the only one.By Elliot Berkman, University of OregonElliot Berkman is Assistant Professor, Psychology at University of Oregon.This article was originally published on The Conversation.Read the original article.last_img read more

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Paleo diet: Humans needed carbs for bigger brains

first_imgShare Share on Facebook LinkedIn Pinterest Hardy’s team highlights the following observations to build a case for dietary carbohydrate being essential for the evolution of modern big-brained humans:(1) The human brain uses up to 25% of the body’s energy budget and up to 60% of blood glucose. While synthesis of glucose from other sources is possible, it is not the most efficient way, and these high glucose demands are unlikely to have been met on a low carbohydrate diet;(2) Human pregnancy and lactation place additional demands on the body’s glucose budget and low maternal blood glucose levels compromise the health of both the mother and her offspring;(3) Starches would have been readily available to ancestral human populations in the form of tubers, as well as in seeds and some fruits and nuts;(4) While raw starches are often only poorly digested in humans, when cooked they lose their crystalline structure and become far more easily digested;(5) Salivary amylase genes are usually present in many copies (average ~6) in humans, but in only 2 copies in other primates. This increases the amount of salivary amylase produced and so increases the ability to digest starch. The exact date when salivary amylase genes multiplied remains uncertain, but genetic evidence suggests it was at some point in the last 1 million years.Hardy proposes that after cooking became widespread, the co-evolution of cooking and higher copy number of the salivary amylase (and possibly pancreatic amylase) genes increased the availability of pre-formed dietary glucose to the brain and fetus, which in turn, permitted the acceleration in brain size increase which occurred from around 800,000 years ago onwards.Eating meat may have kick-started the evolution of bigger brains, but cooked starchy foods together with more salivary amylase genes made us smarter still.center_img Understanding how and why we evolved such large brains is one of the most puzzling issues in the study of human evolution. It is widely accepted that brain size increase is partly linked to changes in diet over the last 3 million years, and increases in meat consumption and the development of cooking have received particular attention from the scientific community.In a new study published in The Quarterly Review of Biology, Dr. Karen Hardy and her team bring together archaeological, anthropological, genetic, physiological and anatomical data to argue that carbohydrate consumption, particularly in the form of starch, was critical for the accelerated expansion of the human brain over the last million years, and coevolved both with copy number variation of the salivary amylase genes and controlled fire use for cooking.With global increase in obesity and diet-related metabolic diseases, interest has intensified in ancestral or ‘Palaeolithic’ diets, not least because – to a first order of approximation – human physiology should be optimized for the nutritional profiles we have experienced during our evolution. Up until now, there has been a heavy focus on the role of animal protein and cooking in the development of the human brain over the last 2 million years, and the importance of carbohydrate, particular in form of starch-rich plant foods, has been largely overlooked. Email Share on Twitterlast_img read more

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PTSD trials suggest ecstasy could also be a treatment for depression

first_imgShare Pinterest Share on Twitter Share on Facebook LinkedIncenter_img “MDMA has the potential to act as a rapid-onset antidepressant via its modulation of the 5-HT system and as an augmentation strategy in cognitive therapy,” the researchers said.As an outlawed drug in the United States and the United Kingdom, there is hesitancy in tapping into MDMA’s potential.  While the drug is classified primarily as a stimulant, its mild hallucinogenic properties also contribute to hesitancy and the stigma attached to hallucinogenic drugs.Additionally, neurotoxicity of MDMA is a concern. For instance, Patel and Titheradge note previous research reporting reduced levels of serotonin and its metabolites in the brain tissue and cerebral spinal fluid in a sample of those who died due to MDMA toxicity. Another in vivo study showed a reduction in serotonin transporter (SERT or 5-HTT; the protein that transports serotonin) density, an indication of neurotoxicity.Discrepancies in several additional studies are noted, however, and more conclusive research is needed to determine how MDMA may be neurotoxic before moving forward, with the authors contending that “despite MDMA passing safety measures for its use in clinical trials of PTSD, we believe that until the discrepancies in neurotoxicity data are resolved, it is unlikely that MDMA will be explored as a rapid-onset antidepressant because of the emphasis in both depression pathophysiology and MDMA neurotoxicity on 5-HT.”“The data from PTSD trials of MDMA assisted psychotherapy set a promising precedent that can likely be applied to depression. The use of MDMA as a standalone rapid-onset antidepressant is theoretically well-grounded, but lacks proof of concept,” Patel and Titheradge wrote.Research on the psychological effects of MDMA have been conducted on animals, in humans using self-report and prospective data, and in clinical trials with human subjects. In general, findings indicate promise in expanding upon current research, especially in using MDMA treatment as a supplement to psychotherapy to possibly enhance therapeutic effectiveness in the treatment of depression. Current clinical trials using MDMA in the treatment of PTSD may springboard this research forward. Stay tuned… Email Increasing consideration is being given to 3,4-Methylene-dioxymethamphetamine (MDMA or “ecstasy”) as a possible treatment approach for depression.In a review of current literature published in Therapeutic Advances in Psychopharmacology, authors Rachel Patel of Green Templeton College and Daniel Titheradge of St Hugh’s College discuss the pros and cons of treating depression with MDMA, noting that clinical trials already in place examining the utility of treating PTSD with MDMA have contributed to an interest in examining how MDMA may be used to treat depression.How might MDMA be helpful in treating depression? Essentially, the neurochemical mechanisms of MDMA link to the monoamine theory of depression, whereby the reduced activity of neurotransmitters (primarily serotonin, or 5-HT) is increased by MDMA. In addition, the capacity of the drug to make serotonin quickly available at receptor sites has appeal over traditional selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors (SSRI), anti-depressant medications that can take several weeks to take effect.last_img read more

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Demand for male escorts for women is growing, global survey finds

first_imgA quarter of Australia’s 516 male escorts cater to women and couples, a global survey of the 61 countries which host online male escort websites has found.But Australia is well behind the United Kingdom in sites catering for women or couples where more than 50 per cent of the 5487 male escorts cater to women and couples, the survey, conducted by by Professor John Scott and Adjunct Professor Victor Minichiello from QUT’s Crime and Justice Research Centre and researchers from The Kirby Institute at the University of New South Wales, found.“Uganda and Argentina are the only other countries that have more male escorts seeking females and couples than solely male clients,” Professor Scott, from QUT School of Justice, said. Share “It’s assumed that men are the primary market for male escorts, and while it is true that most escorts target male clients, our survey suggests a significant emerging market for women who pay for sexual services from men.“While more than 57 per cent of identified websites catered to male customers only, 11 per cent were specifically for female clients and a similar number of sites were for couples, most of the opposite sex.“As expected, we found twice as many male escorts had male clients only (72,106) as against the 32,948 escorts for women or couples.”The results of the survey are contained in the blog About Male Escorts and will be published as a book chapter in Male Sex Work and Society (Volume II), to be released in 2018. The survey found a total of 324,852 profiles of male escorts online but after eliminating duplications (many male sex workers list on multiple sites) there were 105,009 male escorts.Professor Scott said Mexico’s nine websites led the table in this emerging aspect of the sex industry.“Mexico had 14,531 male escorts prepared to cater to women and couples; Brazil (6892) the United States (3481), the United Kingdom (2926), Spain (2357), Germany (359), and Japan (327) followed. Email Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn “Other countries with a high percentage of escorts for women and couples include Chile (41 per cent), Germany (42 per cent), Hungary (45 per cent) and Malaysia (46.5 per cent).”Professor Scott said even traditional, socially conservative societies hosted male escort websites with escorts who advertised online as catering for women and couples.“Malaysia has 88 escorts on its nine sites and 41 of them provide for women and couples, and the United Arab Emirates has 124 escorts for women or couples out of 337 male escorts,” he said.“In jurisdictions where sex work or same-sex relations are heavily penalised, it is possible that escort sites are known only to participants within relatively closed social networks. They may also be listed on the ‘dark web’ – these sites were not included in the survey.“If you are a woman or a couple seeking a male escort using online male escort services, you are out of luck in Costa Rica, Finland, Israel, Panama and Taiwan where the male escorts have male clients only.“There are slim pickings in Bulgaria, China, Estonia, Uruguay and Paraguay where each country has just one male escort who has found a niche in the market and offers this service.”“The average price worldwide seems to be $200 an hour but it can be thousands of dollars for a weekend, especially among the international male escorts who list on websites around the world.“It’s important to note that websites such as Rentmen and Hourboy included escort profiles from around the world and were often hosted in countries where sex work was legal. These websites were among the largest overall and mostly cater for male clients.Professor Scott said the survey counted only male sex workers operating online, not those in brothels or massage parlours or outdoor settings.“The figures fluctuate over time with sex workers and websites entering and leaving the market. The fluidity makes the online marketplace appealing for many.”To check for the validity and emerging trends over time, a similar survey will be conducted annually.last_img read more

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