A long time ago, in a Science class not so far way

first_img Top Searches Top Searches ScottWest UnionRichard Seas PreviousACOVSD Board holds April 19 meetingNextLady Indians improve to 7-4 with SHAC win at Lynchburg Around the WebThis Video Will Soon Be Banned. Watch Before It’s DeletedSecrets RevealedMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Blood Sugar BlasterThis Weird Method Can Restore Your Vision Naturally (Watch)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancel HomeNewsA long time ago, in a Science class not so far way By Ashley McCartyNorth Adams High School eighth-grade Science teacher Matt Young was recently awarded the Middle School Teacher of the Year from the American Chemical Society of Cincinnati.Each year, the American Chemical Society recognizes high school teachers with exceptional skills in teaching and a consistent record of dedication to the growth and welfare of their students. It would be hard to believe that Young’s penchant for teaching did not come naturally.“I bounced around from college to college before I knew what I wanted to do; University of Cincinnati, Shawnee State University, Southern State Community College, and the University of Dayton. To be honest with you, teaching was never a passion. I wanted to go into the medical field. I had a lot of family members that taught, and I had no interest to teach at all, so I decided that wasn’t going to be my route,” said Young.One year, after his family purchased a driving school, he was asked if he would be interested in teaching over the summer.“I caught the bug I guess. I never really had the calling, but I went back to school and I attended Shawnee State University for two years and got my teaching license there. I’ve been teaching now for 21 years,” said Young.After college, Young was hired at North Adams Elementary as a sixth-grade Math teacher.“I basically taught everything, but primarily sixth-grade Math for 10 to 12 years with Social Studies and Language Arts thrown in there. During that time I received my principal’s license and took a really weird job. I was the assistant principal at the elementary and the high school at the same time, so I was going back and forth. It was really a quick way to the top, but I had a principal that I was working for resign midway through the year on Christmas break, and with me basically only having half a year of experience, they asked me to take this job as North Adams High School Principal,” said Young.For four years Young performed his duties as a principal, but it just wasn’t the same.“I really just missed the kids, to be honest. I didn’t have the same relationship with the kids as a principal. You just can’t interact the way you can in a classroom. I was also raising a family. At the time, my wife and I had a set of twins that would have been four or five, and my son, who would have been about 10. I started to miss some of their things. Instead of wanting to go watch them play their sports or activities, I was covering here. It was one of those things where you need to go back and look at your priorities. So [between] family and the kids here at school, I got back in here to enjoy it,” said Young.A stipulation in his contract stated that he would have to find employment elsewhere for a year after being a principal.“I taught one year at West Union Elementary. That was a great experience, I had great co-workers there. After that, the eighth grade Science position opened here, so I’ve been here for three years and I love it. I love Science,” said Young.Over the years, his philosophy of teaching has evolved with experience.“When I first started teaching, it was all about state testing. Anytime I taught a class, it was always the test. I equated it to the Super Bowl. We’re practicing the whole year, the state test comes. I was very good at prepping and getting those kids pumped up for the test, and we always did really well. As I attained more experience, I started seeing that the kids needed something else. I want my kids to have social skills, I want them to be able to survive socially and emotionally in society. If you gain that trust with the kids and you treat them like young adults with respect, they’ll run through a wall for you. The test will just come. I teach Science in the classroom, obviously, but trying to instill values and trying to get them to be productive young men and women,” said Young.Instilling those values is more important to him than actually teaching science, he said.“I try to interact with every kid. I have the seventh grade that is coming through, they come by my room every day. I don’t teach them, but I interact with them. It’s not just me, my colleagues are great. We’re all interacting with those kids,” said Young.Two years ago, North Adams High School Principal Linda Naylor tasked Young with creating two non-credit electives for junior high.“So I came up with things that I like. I thought well if I like it, I should be able to have a passion to teach it. So I decided to come up with a class called “The Science of Star Wars” or “Star Wars Science”. We take the unbelievable science fiction part of Star Wars and apply it to actual science. I thought the kids would like it, but it made me feel really old that these kids were coming into the classroom and had no idea about Star Wars. So, I felt like I kind of swung and missed with that one, but I do feel like the kids being in the classroom get exposure to it and they’re like, ‘Hey, this isn’t that bad.’ It’s a classic story, good versus evil, and they can all relate to it,” said Young.Some of the students jumped into it and thought it was neat, he said.“So, for example, we create the lava lamp of Mustafar — which Mustafar is where Darth Vader was created — so we go in and create a lava lamp. I relate that then with volcanoes, so we go really in-depth with volcanoes. That’s one quarter or one nine weeks, and then I did a Sports Science class. You can grab those athletes that may not enjoy the [science-fiction]. I made some good connections. I have Dr. Baseball, he works for the Reds. I was able to make contact with him, and with COVID-19 it’s been a mess with both of these classes. The hands-on aspect has kind of gone away, but I still have that connection where I can go to him and we can start looking at the new launch angles and exit velocity that they’re doing in baseball. We can bring that into the classroom and kids can enjoy that,” said Young.Having options make the classroom more popular than just an eighth-grade Science class, he said.Young has been a fan of Star Wars since its debut in 1977.“I had all the toys and still do. I have half of a refrigerator box cut with all of my toys still in it. They’re all the originals, though not in the packages, unfortunately. Anything that’s Marvel, Star Wars, anything Disney right now, I bring it to the classroom. Marvel is probably more popular right now than Star Wars, so we try to bring in something with that. Even if it’s not science-related, we’ll just have a conversation. The kids enjoy having those conversations. Not necessarily just during class time, but just in the hallways and having conversations they like,” said Young.Perhaps surprisingly, some of the most avid Star Wars fans in his classroom are girls. While there are more male students engaged, some of his top students are female.“The kids [are what I enjoy most about teaching]. I have great colleagues, too. I enjoy coming to work. It’s fun, and the kids make it different. People will say that the kids get on your nerves, but the thing is, if the kids get on your nerves, you probably shouldn’t be a teacher. The kids need us. I’m not just talking about the kids that are at-risk, all kids need someone to talk to. They spend basically eight hours with us a day, they need to have somebody that they can trust, somebody who is going to make their educational experience enjoyable. I can’t imagine sitting in the school for eight hours and really not feel like you’re being cared about,” said Young.His philosophy as a teacher and a principal has always been “you have to love your kids more than you love the subject that you teach.”“It’s embarrassing a little bit [to receive this award]. I like it because it promotes education. Every time I open my Facebook there’s my face. It’s great, but I like the fact that’s it’s at least promoting education to that point. It’s nice that I was recognized as teaching in Adams County when like the High Scool Teacher of the Year was from Madeira, Ohio, and then the Elementary School Teacher of the Year was from Our Lady of Lourdes. So, it’s nice to get recognition here when you have all of Cincinnati competing. It typically doesn’t work out that way. I like that because it promotes the area. Myself, I’m not much of a self-promoter. It’s humbling. It was very surprising, and then I accepted my award through Zoom because of COVID-19. I’m thankful for it. Just to be recognized is wonderful,” said Young.Naylor, who nominated Young for the award, was thrilled.“When I looked at the criteria, Mr. Young has a lot of teaching experience. I worked with him when he has taught English, language arts, math and now he’s teaching science. He’s good at whatever he teaches. I really feel that he’s excelled in this eighth-grade science area. It’s an area that is tested by the state, and while we’ve only had one year of testing because of COVID-19, he’s had great results. I’m looking forward to good results again this year. I was thrilled [when he won]. I had no idea how big the pool would be or who he would be competing against, so when I got the notification back from the American Chemical Society I was just thrilled for him,” said Naylor.center_img Powered By 10 Sec How to Slice & Mince Vegetables Like a Pro NextStay How to Slice & Mince Vegetables Like a ProNOW PLAYINGHow to Cook Scrambled EggsNOW PLAYINGHawaiian Roll Ham SlidersNOW PLAYINGApple Pie Bites With Caramel SauceNOW PLAYINGApple Pie BitesNOW PLAYINGHomemade Caramel SauceNOW PLAYINGPerfect Bacon Every TimeNOW PLAYINGOld Fashioned Soft and Buttery Yeast RollsNOW PLAYINGHow to Chop an Onion PerfectlyNOW PLAYINGHow to Chill a Drink in 2 MinutesNOW PLAYINGHow to Peel Hard Boiled EggsNOW PLAYINGHow to Peel TomatoesNOW PLAYINGCream Cheese Cake Mix CookiesNOW PLAYINGHow to Carve a Whole ChickenNOW PLAYINGHow to Make the Ultimate Light and Fluffy Mashed PotatoesNOW PLAYINGSweet Alabama PecanbreadNOW PLAYINGPumpkin Cream Cheese BarsNOW PLAYINGHow to Core and Slice a PineappleNOW PLAYINGHow to Knead DoughNOW PLAYINGHow to Use a Meat ThermometerNOW PLAYINGSlow Cooker/Crock Pot HintsNOW PLAYINGHow to Quarter a ChickenNOW PLAYINGHow to Clean Garbage DisposalsNOW PLAYINGHow to Clean Stainless Steel SinksNOW PLAYING5 Easy and Delicious Crock Pot Meatball Appetizer RecipesNOW PLAYING Arrow Left #1 Icon Created with Sketch. Arrow right #1 Icon Created with Sketch. A long time ago, in a Science class not so far wayNA Science teacher Matt Young brings a unique style and creativity to the junior high classroomApril 27, 2021Mark CarpenterNews, Top Stories0 With his unique style and creative lessons, North Adams High School eighth-grade Science teacher Matt Young was recently awarded the Middle School Teacher of the Year from the American Chemical Society of Cincinnati. (Provided photo)last_img read more

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First Solar to Supply Largest Solar Project in Australia

first_img TAGSPPL Avista considering RNG on way to net-zero carbon goals By Editors of Power Engineering By chloecox – RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Previous articleSeawater Leak at Pilgrim Nuclear Forces Reduced PowerNext articleExplosion at French Nuclear Plant Injures Workers chloecox Twitter No posts to display First Solar Inc. announced it was awarded the module supply contract for a solar facility that will be the largest on the entire continent of Australia. Facebook “Large-scale solar is fast becoming one of the most cost-effective sources of energy generation in Australia. This project represents the viability of the commercial and industrial solar market in Australia, and the growing trend of major energy consumers owning and operating renewable energy assets,” said Jack Curtis, First Solar’s regional manager for Asia Pacific. Linkedincenter_img Twitter RenewablesNew ProjectsSolar Facebook First Solar said its technology has a higher energy yield than crystalline silicon technology in hot and humid climates such as Townsville due to its lower temperature coefficient, linear shading response and superior spectral response. Voith Hydro supplying pumped storage equipment to pair with Idaho combined solar-wind project Linkedin The Sun Metals Solar Farm 15 kilometers south of Townsville in North Queensland will use 1.17 million photovoltaic panels to generate 140 MW for the Sun Metals zinc refinery, a member of the Korea Zinc Group. Construction is scheduled to begin in April. Renewable project management firm Bradley acquired by Bureau Veritas 2.9.2017 First Solar to Supply Largest Solar Project in Australialast_img read more

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President

first_imgSearch for The Nerman FamilyPresidentKansas City ArtInstituteKansas City,MissouriThe Kansas City Art Institute (KCAI), one of the most respectedindependent colleges of art and design in the nation, seeks adynamic president to build on its current momentum and lead theinstitution to its next era of success. Starting in summer 2022,the next president will guide strategic growth, strengthen thecollege’s identity and community, deepen its relationships withexternal partners, and energize the campus community in pursuit offurther academic and artistic excellence.Founded in 1885, KCAI is a fully-accredited four-year privatecollege serving approximately 700 degree-seeking students with 115full- and part-time faculty and an operating budget of $22 million.The college offers the B.F.A. degree in 13 majors spanning the finearts, design, and the liberal arts, with a growing curricularemphasis on digital technology that balances its longstandingstrengths in traditional studio disciplines.Located on a beautiful 16-acre campus in the cultural heart ofmetropolitan Kansas City, Missouri and framed by two world-classart museums—the Nelson-Atkins Museum and theKemper Museum of ContemporaryArt—KCAI has long been a leader in the thriving art and designculture of the community. KCAI faculty and alumni have beencredited with sparking the proliferation of art galleries in thecity’s Crossroads ArtsDistrict, which in turn helped to catalyze the rebirth ofKansas City’s downtown as a vibrant center for the visual andperforming arts.This is an exciting opportunity for an innovative and visionaryleader to further develop a premier art and design institution thatprepares talented students to transform the world through theircreative pursuits. Candidates should bring substantive knowledgeand passion for the visual arts; a proven capacity fororganizational and academic leadership, including developing andimplementing strategic plans; and a demonstrated track record withfundraising and fiscal management. KCAI seeks an individual with arespectful, collaborative, and accessible leadership style;excellent communication skills; a lived commitment to inclusion,diversity, equity, access, and sustainability; a penchant forcommunity engagement; and the drive to be an ambassador andadvocate for the college in the broader regional and nationallandscapes.Kansas City Art Institute has retained the national executivesearch firm Isaacson, Miller to assist in the recruitment of itsnext president. All inquiries, nominations, referrals, andapplications should be submitted in confidence through theIsaacson, Miller website at http://www.imsearch.com/7469.Kansas City Art Institute is fully committed to EqualEmployment Opportunity and to attracting, retaining, developing andpromoting the most qualified employees without regard to theirrace, gender, gender identity, color, religion, sex, sexualorientation, national origin, age, physical or mental disability,genetic information, citizenship status, veteran status, or anyother characteristic prohibited by federal, state or locallaw.last_img read more

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Lotus Dominates The House Of Blues Boston [A Gallery]

first_imgSetlist: Lotus at the House Of Blues, Boston, MA – 2/5/16Set One: Tip Of The Tongue > Lucid Awakening, Cold Facts, The Surf, Golden Ghost > Flower SermonSet Two: Blacklight Sunflare, Spiritualize > Contagion > Spiritualize, Disappear In A Blood Red Sky, It’s All Clear To Me Now > Umbilical Moonrise, Inspector Norse > Tip Of The TongueEncore: HammerstrikeCheck out the full gallery of Lotus and El Ten Eleven at the House of Blues Boston from ATS Photography below: Last night, Lotus made their triumphant return to the House of Blues in Boston, MA, playing to a packed house despite a snow storm that raged throughout the day. Come nightfall, however, it was Lotus that would be doing the raging, by dipping into their bag of jamtronica tricks for a powerful performance. With a new album on the way, the band got down with a “Tip Of The Tongue” opener, and wound up closing out the second set by reprising the song. With tracks like “Spiritualize” and “Umbilical Moonrise” in the mix, this was one rocking show that Boston fans won’t soon forget.El Ten Eleven opened the night as well, and ATS Photography was on hand to capture the magic. Enjoy his photos and the full setlist below: Load remaining imageslast_img read more

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Fuji Brings Track and Mountain Bike Inspired Fixies

first_imgThe Feather comes from their Classic Track Bike, which was made for the velodrome and a pure racing fixed gear. It’s designed to be a bit more practical and add some style. It has a flip flop hub, brakes and comes in four colors that get color matched grips, saddle, etc. MSRP is $649. Frame is Elios 2 butted Chromoly with 1″ triple butted Chromoly fork and alloy quill stem. Stock colors: Fuji’s Urban PressCamp contingent had very few gears save for the touring bike shown at the bottom of this post.The Declaration is a mountain bike inspired urban fixie. It has mountain bike geometry, a taller head tube and flat bar. Like most fixed gear bikes, it’s sold with removeable front and rear brakes. Rack and fender mounts on the rear give it some commuting capability, and it comes in black or metallic lime green with color matched bar and seat rails.More pics and more bikes after the break… The bottom right is Sparkling Gray, not just another black one. Click any of them to enlarge.The chromed brake line retainers and matching handlebar grips add a bit of polish, and they make it easy to keep your bike looking super clean if you decide to remove the brakes (no welded on guides cluttering things up).The Classic Track Bike ($549), above, and the touring bike ($1,049 w/ Shimano Tiagra/Deore), below.…and the glamour shot because my photo’s pretty bad:center_img A bit of detail hides inside the brake bridge on the rear. MSRP is $599. Here are the glamour shots, note that the black bike gets white saddle, bar and stem:last_img read more

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CUNA warns Congress of ‘dangerous moral hazard’ amid breach responses

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr “The idea that retailers have no responsibility for protecting consumer data presents a dangerous moral hazard,” Credit Union National Association President/CEO Bill Cheney said in a letter sent Monday to all members of the U.S. Congress.That danger, Cheney warned lawmakers, is reflected in the current effort by retail organizations to try to shift both the cost and liability during breaches away from the retailers involved and on to financial institutions, their customers and members, and taxpayers.The CUNA letter comes as many in Congress and across the country debate how best to respond to recent data breaches at Target and Neiman Marcus that have compromised the financial and personal information of tens of millions of Americans. Arts and crafts store Michaels has also launched its own investigation into a potential data breach at its stores, and the Federal Bureau of Investigation in recent weeks has warned retailers these breaches will become more common. (See Jan. 27 News Now: FBI warns hacking attacks are on the rise.)CUNA was the first trade group to communicate with members of Congress following the breach, seeking hearings on the issue, and House and Senate members in at least three committees are considering holding hearings on the topic, perhaps as early as next week. (See related story: Senate Banking to conduct Feb. 3 data security hearing.) continue reading »last_img read more

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Confidential judicial evaluation to make online debut

first_img Confidential judicial evaluation to make online debut Program will allow lawyers to post evaluations of a judge’s performance October 1, 2007 Regular News Gary Blankenship Senior Editor The confidential judicial evaluation program to let Florida’s judges know how they are doing will soon go online.The Judicial Administration and Evaluation Committee reviewed the details for the unveiling this fall of the program, which will allow Bar members with a password for the Bar’s Web site to post an evaluation of a judge’s performance.Committee Chair John Kest, a Ninth Circuit judge, said the change should encourage broader participation in the evaluation program. It is expected to be fully up and running in November, following some testing in October.Under the current system, judges send evaluation forms every few months to lawyers who have appeared before them. The lawyers can fill out and return the forms to the Bar, which makes sure any identifying information about the lawyer is removed and then forwards them to the judge. Participation by judges and lawyers is strictly voluntary, and all results are confidential.“If the judges don’t send the evaluations out, it fails right there,” Kest said. “A lot of judges didn’t know about it and a lot of judges were afraid if they did send them out [the media] would get it and it would be published.“Our effort is to make this more available, make it as anonymous as possible, and make sure the judges were aware of it and would use it.”According to Doris Maffei, who oversees the evaluation program for the Bar, lawyers with Bar passwords will be able to access a special section on the Bar’s Web site where they can leave an evaluation of the judge.The program is set up so those leaving evaluations cannot be traced, and the information is encrypted and can be viewed only by the affected judge, she said.Kest noted while going online should encourage more lawyers to participate in the evaluations, there still is no requirement for a judge to ever check his or her feedback.He said he didn’t know about the evaluation program until he became a judge, noting he used to ask lawyers to tell him how he was doing, and they either offered compliments or didn’t reply. “My judicial assistant said, ‘What did you expect? They would tell you you’re screwing up?’”When he discovered the evaluation program, he began sending the forms out.“It provides wonderful information to a judge on how he or she is doing,” Kest said. “I’ve expanded mine to include: how is your judicial assistant doing, how are your court deputies doing, and how is your trial court doing.“The idea of putting it on the computer was number one to make it accessible without the judges having to send it out — not because judges wouldn’t send it out, but it’s expensive because you have to mail it and it’s a pain and you forget it sometimes — and to make it more immediate. Judicial assistants are busy and they don’t have to send it out now,” he added.“The corollary to doing it by computer is more people are computer literate. The idea is with younger attorneys and everyone being more computer literate it makes it much more accessible. They can send it out and the judge can look at it when he or she wants to.“These input forms will make a good judge better and they’ll make an average judge a good judge,” Kest said. “If you happen to have a bad judge — and I don’t think there are many of those — maybe it will allow them to be aware of the problems and correct them. That’s the ideal situation.”For the moment, the Bar will keep the paper evaluations along with the online assessments, although Kest said paper evaluations eventually may be phased out.Lawyers and judges on the committee began testing the evaluation system in September. Members of the Trial Lawyers and Appellate Practice sections were scheduled for the second round of testing beginning in September through the middle of this month.The results of those practice runs will be evaluated and any changes, if needed, will be made. The system will formally open for all Bar members on November 1 and will be announced with an e-mail to Bar members on that date. Confidential judicial evaluation to make online debutlast_img read more

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AUDIO – CARICOM @ SIDS2014 – Dr. Douglas Slater Speaks

first_imgShare this:PrintTwitterFacebookLinkedInLike this:Like Loading… Six Eastern Caribbean countries deemed safe for travel – CDC Oct 16, 2020 Oct 16, 2020 Re-elected WICB President to meet Grenada PMA meeting with Grenada’s Prime Minister Dr. Keith Mitchell on cricket governance is among the first items of business for re-elected President of the West Indies Cricket Board (WICB) Mr. Dave Cameron. Jamaican Cameron defeated challenger, former Test cricketer Barbadian Joel Garner by 8 votes to 4 in elections during…March 9, 2015In “Audio”Heads put spotlight on tackling scourge of NCDsThe Region’s on-going challenges with Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs) came before the Thirty-Eighth CARICOM Heads of Government Meeting in Grenada on Thursday. This year is the tenth anniversary of the 2007 signing of the Port-of-Spain Declaration through which CARICOM Heads committed to tackling the scourge of NCDs. As a signal of the…July 6, 2017In “Grenada”#islands2014 – VIDEO – CARICOM @ SIDS2014 – Dr. Douglas Slater – Assistant Secretary General, Human and Social Development.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-FOnz9gAUfUSeptember 2, 2014In “Event”Share this on WhatsApp CARPHA Partners with, PAHO to Ensure Caribbean States’… Oct 16, 2020 Oct 15, 2020 CMO says Saint Lucia at critical stage of COVID-19 outbreak You may be interested in… Barbados releases new COVID-19 Travel Protocols last_img read more

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EHFD extinguish dumpster fire at the East Hampton Town Recycling Center

first_imgMembers of the East Hampton Fire Departmrent extinguished a fire in a dumpster at the East Hampton Town Recycling Center on Springs Fireplace Road on Saturday, February 16th, 2019. Independent/Michael HellerMembers of the East Hampton Fire Department extinguished a fire in a dumpster at the East Hampton Town Recycling Center on Springs Fireplace Road on Saturday, February 16. Independent/Michael Heller Sharelast_img

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NuCO2 report operating results

first_imgGet instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270. Subscribelast_img

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