Tool Is Officially Working On First New Album Since 2006

first_imgStoried rockers Tool have confirmed the rumors that they are working on a new album, as the band’s guitarist, Adam Jones, posted the following photo to Instagram: This will be the first new Tool album since 10,000 Days (2006), and, as the caption says #Smokeonthehorizon, we can only expect big things from Tool in 2015.last_img

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Monster Energy Series team rosters for Sonoma

first_imgNASCAR announced this offseason that it will standardize at-track team rosters across all three national series in 2018, providing a structure for the number of personnel working on each vehicle during the course of a race weekend.Official team rosters for Sunday’s Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series race at Sonoma (3 p.m. ET on FS1, PRN, SiriusXM NASCAR Radio) have been released. Click the print icon above, or the link below.ROSTERS: Sonoma raceRELATED: Overview of 2018 rules updateslast_img

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How Keselowski’s Checkered Flag Foundation will honor veterans in 2020

first_imgStatesville, NC (Nov. 1, 2019) – Brad Keselowski’s Checkered Flag Foundation and Autotrader announced the return of the Tribute 2 Veterans presented by Autotrader program which will honor America’s heroes during a 2020 race weekend.Starting today, friends and family of former service members can submit a veteran’s name to be featured on the No. 2 Autotrader Ford Mustang that Keselowski will pilot during the March 2020 race weekend at Atlanta Motor Speedway.“Carrying the names of veterans to Victory Lane on my Autotrader Ford Mustang last year was one of the highlights of my 2019 season,” said Keselowski. “I’m incredibly thankful to have sponsors like Autotrader that provide my family and the Checkered Flag Foundation the opportunity to honor veterans in unique ways. We are always looking for creative opportunities to honor the men and women who have sacrificed so much for our freedom. Featuring veterans’ names on my car again next season at Atlanta Motor Speedway is just one small way for us to honor these heroes, while also raising funds that will allow the foundation to continue its mission.”RELATED: Brad’s blog on tributeThe tax deductible donation cost is $100 per submission to be part of the campaign, with proceeds benefiting the Checkered Flag Foundation in its mission to honor and assist those who have sacrificed for our country and our communities. Each veteran submission will receive a personalized certificate and a commemorative poster of the No. 2 Autotrader Ford Mustang displaying the names of the veterans along with a letter of thanks from Keselowski.Those wishing to submit a veteran’s name can do so via www.CheckeredFlagFoundation.org. Submissions will be accepted through Tuesday, Dec. 31, 2019.Participating individuals in the program can use #Tribute2Veterans on social media to show their involvement and support of the program.last_img read more

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Stephen Marley To Host Bob Marley 75th Birthday Tribute Livestream [Watch]

first_imgStephen Marley will perform a virtual covers set in tribute to his late father Bob Marley as part of the ongoing celebration of the late reggae icon’s 75th birthday last year.Scheduled to air on Thursday (1/28) at 8 p.m. ET via the Bob Marley YouTube page, the virtual event is the second tribute performance hosted by Marley’s sons, following Ziggy Marley‘s virtual covers set over the summer. As Brooklyn Vegan points out, Stephen Marley will plan on performing a number of familiar reggae songs made famous by his father including “Babylon System”, “Zimbabwe”, “Burnin’ and Lootin’”, “I Shot the Sheriff”, “Three Little Birds”, “One Love”, and “Could You Be Loved”.Marley will also take part in a Q&A session following the performance, which will stream here. Scroll down to watch a teaser clip from the Q&A session.Related: Toots And The Maytals Share “Three Little Birds” Cover Feat. Ziggy Marley, Ringo Starr Watch Stephen Marley’s virtual covers set on Thursday night beginning at 8 p.m. ET via the video player below.Stephen Marley – Bob Marley 75th Celebration (Pt. 2) – 1/28/21[Video: Bob Marley]Both Ziggy and Stephen Marley are scheduled to join Ben Harper & The Innocent Criminals for a performance at Colorado’s Red Rocks Amphitheatre on Sunday, May 30th, though the fate of the event is still up in the air with COVID-19 still impacting the concert industry heading into 2021.last_img read more

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Board: ‘We remain on budget’

first_imgBoard: ‘We remain on budget’ Board: ‘We remain on budget’ February 15, 2017 Gary Blankenship Senior Editor Regular Newscenter_img The Bar has not increased annual fees for more than 15 years Senior Editor The Bar’s 2016-17 budget is meeting projections and work is well underway on the 2017-18 budget, which will be presented to the board at its March 24 meeting in St. Augustine. “We remain on budget; everything looks like it will end up where we anticipated it would end up. We are addressing how to manage the reductions of savings going forward,” Budget Committee Chair Paul SanGiovanni told the board at its January meeting. He had reported to the board at past meetings that the Bar has not increased annual fees for more than 15 years. At that time, the long-range plan was to use the excess fees in the early years to build sufficient resources so that future fee increases would not be required as often. Therefore, as planned, the Bar is now in the stage of the cycle where it is using the funds that had been reserved for that purpose. One significant project currently underway is the replacement of several of the Bar’s outdated computer systems, which will allow for more analysis and reporting on Bar operations and expenditures, but also temporarily increases costs during the transition from old to new. SanGiovanni said that replacement accounts for some of the deficit, which he said is unavoidable and will pay dividends for the Bar in the future. President Bill Schifino noted that Bar financial operations are the results of three committees working together – Budget, Investment, and Audit. “Remember, we haven’t raised our dues in 15 years and it is imperative that we continue to sharpen the pencils and do all of the things we do. But keep in mind, years ago it was always anticipated at this point we would be running a deficit of some degree,” he said. “Your Bar association. . . does a wonderful job minding the money.” SanGiovanni added: “What we’ve learned this year is, as a board and as an organization, we’re very good at adding programs and very bad at managing or getting rid of programs. That is a very cumbersome process.. . . My goal is to develop a more streamlined system for the Program Evaluation Committee and Budget to work together in tandem so at the end of the day we can identify programs that need to be addressed, and we can identify budgetary goals that they need to meet.” Recommendations from that effort should be ready by May, SanGiovanni said. Budget Committee Vice Chair Steve Davis, who will oversee the 2017-18 fiscal spending, said the committee spent January 18 going over Bar staff requests for the next budget year. “The process is such that we break up, and we meet with the heads of departments,” said Davis, who also praised Bar staff for their dedication to the process. “We are focusing on a lot of issues, and we are going to be focusing on a number of items to try to improve our budget going forward.. . . Because of the nature of our organization, the public service we do, we do have to spend a lot of money on a lot of great, great projects. “We will come back to you with more details at the March meeting, but for now we’re going to tell you it’s a great process.” Board member Ian Comisky, who serves on the Budget Committee and chairs the Investment Committee, added, “There was a lot of intensity in the room; the whole committee was working very, very hard to try to find some savings for the coming year in the budget.” At past meetings SanGiovanni said Bar reserves, as expected, have gradually built up since the last increase in annual membership fees and is now at the high end of what is called for in Bar financial policies. But, also as expected, that annual fee hike — approved in 2001 — could prove insufficient as the Bar grows and faces new challenges, and the annual Bar budgets are now running deficits and reducing those reserves. By the 2020-21 budget year, he said Bar reserves could be at the low end of what is called for in Bar policies, and an annual membership fee raise might be needed. It would be only the second hike in the past 30 years.last_img read more

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State, local public health get mixed grades on readiness

first_imgDec 19, 2012 (CIDRAP News) – An annual report on state and local public health preparedness offered mixed grades today, saying much progress has been made in the past decade but that important gaps persist and an ominous budget-cutting trend continued in most states.The Trust for America’s Health (TFAH), a nonprofit, nonpartisan advocacy group in Washington, DC, said 35 states met no more than 6 of 10 key indicators that were used to gauge preparedness this year, ranging from funding to community resiliency and laboratory capacity.The report is the 10th annual edition of TFAH’s Ready or Not? Protecting the Public from Diseases, Disasters, and Bioterrorism. It was issued in partnership with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.”The biggest threats to public health preparedness are budget cuts and complacency,” TFAH Executive Director Jeffrey Levi, PhD, said in introducing the report at a press teleconference today.TFAH found that 29 states reduced public health funding between fiscal years 2010-11 and 2011-12. Twenty-three of those cut their budgets 2 years in a row, and 14 did so 3 years running. And since 2008, budget cuts have forced 45,700 job losses in state and local public health, the report says, with 57% of local health departments reducing or dropping at least one program in 2011.In addition, preparedness grants from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have declined by 38%, adjusted for inflation, since 2005, TFAH said.On the 10 preparedness indicators, five states led the pack by meeting 8 of 10: Maryland, Mississippi, North Carolina, Vermont, and Wisconsin. On the other end of the scale, Kansas and Montana met only 3 of the 10.One finding TFAH emphasized was that only two states have met the national goal of vaccinating 90% of young children (10 to 35 months of age) against pertussis. This year Washington state had one of the biggest pertussis outbreaks in recent history, the group noted.Levi said the set of indicators used this year is not identical to sets in previous years, as TFAH adjusts the indicators to reflect changing priorities and concerns. “New issues arise, and we need to pay attention to that,” he said. “Climate change would be a good example of that.”Only 15 states have climate-change adaptation plans, which include planning for the health threats posed by extreme weather events, the report says.Some of the indicators have been retired over the years because large majorities of states achieved them, the report says. For example, all states now have met the CDC standard for the capability to receive and distribute medical supplies from the Strategic National Stockpile.Other findings about the preparedness indicators include these:Forty-seven states and Washington, DC, were able to notify and gather public health staff to ensure a quick response to an incident in 2011, according to CDC findings.Thirteen states and the nation’s capital do not require Medicaid to cover flu shots without copayments for beneficiaries younger than 65.Twenty states do not require licensed child-care facilities to have an evacuation and relocation plan for multiple hazards, a requirement listed as a barometer of community resilience.Twenty-states have not been accredited by the Emergency Management Accreditation Program, a voluntary, peer-reviewed process.Twenty-six states and Washington do not participate in a multi-state compact allowing nurses to practice in other states in emergencies.Thirteen state public health labs say they don’t have enough staff to work five 12-hour days for 6 to 8 weeks in response to an infectious disease outbreak.Only one public health lab, in Washington, DC, reported a decrease in its capacity to deal with chemical threats between August 2011 and August 2012.TFAH said the scores are not intended to reflect on the performance of specific state or local health departments, because they are influenced by factors that are often beyond the control of those agencies.The report offers a number of recommendations to remedy the gaps in preparedness. One of them is for Congress to reauthorize the Pandemic and All-Hazards Preparedness Act (PAHPA)—a goal that moved closer today with House passage of the latest version of the reauthorization bill.TFAH also called for modernizing biosurveillance to create a “real-time, interoperable system to better detect and respond to problems.”Officials at TFAH were asked if that means they endorse BioWatch, the Department of Homeland Security Program that monitors the air in major cities for pathogens that might signal a bioterrorist attack.”We’re not necessarily endorsing a specific approach, Levi replied. “What we’re saying and what is consistent with what the administration is saying is we need to be harnessing new technologies. With the move to high-tech approaches to health information technologies we can learn so much more about public health and have situational awareness during a public health emergency.”In other comments at the press conference, Paul Kuehnert, MS, RN, of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation said the past 18 months have brought many lessons about how to respond to public health threats. He recited a sizable list of state and local responses to Superstorm Sandy on the East Coast, such as a hotline that New Jersey’s health department established to answer questions about mold hazards and drinking water.”The response to Sandy was inspiring. It provided a clear set of examples of the important role public health plays in a time of need,” Kuehnert said. He is senior program officer and director of the foundation’s public health team.See also: Dec 19 TFAH press releaseFull text of the TFAH report (80 pages)Dec 20, 2011, CIDRAP News story on 2011 TFAH reportlast_img read more

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FDA: Antibiotic use in food animals continues to rise

first_imgA report today from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) shows that sales and distribution of all antimicrobial drugs approved for use in food-producing animals rose by 1% from 2014 to 2015, continuing an upward trend.While the 1% increase ties for the lowest annual increase since 2009, the FDA report, which includes several years of domestic sales and distribution data, shows that sales and distribution of all antimicrobial drugs approved for use in meat and poultry increased by 24% from 2009 through 2015. More significantly, sales and distribution of medically important antibiotics for use in food animals increased by 26% from 2009 through 2015, including a 2% increase from 2014 to 2015.Overall, medically important antibiotics accounted for 62% of all antibiotics sold for use in food-producing animals in 2015. Approximately 70% of all medically important antibiotics in the United States are sold for use in animals.Among the antibiotics that are considered medically important in human medicine, lincomasides saw the greatest percentage increase in domestic sales over the 6-year period, rising 96% from 2009 to 2015. That includes a 22% decrease in sales from 2014 to 2015.Tetracyclines, which represent the largest volume of sales, increased by 31% from 2009 through 2015 and by 4% from 2014 through 2015. Aminoglycoside sales volume showed the greatest percentage increase from 2014 through 2015, rising 13%. And cephalosporins, which represent only a fraction of total sales, rose by 61%.’Every year it goes up’Experts say the continued rise in the use of medically important antibiotics in food-producing animals is a concern.”Every year I expect sales of medically important antibiotics to go down, since the industry keeps saying they are using less and only when justified,” public health and animal medicine consultant Gail Hansen, DVM, told CIDRAP News. “But every year it goes up.”Hansen noted, however, that since the number of animals raised in the United States went up in 2015, it’s possible that sales per animal are steady compared with 2014.”The news is not good,” David Wallinga, MD, senior health officer with the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), wrote in a blog post. “Against the backdrop of a crisis in now untreatable or nearly untreatable infections, this report further underscores how urgently we need more and stronger government action to address the ongoing overuse of the drugs in livestock.”Under the Animal Drug User Fee Amendments of 2008, antimicrobial drug sponsors are required to report to the FDA on annually the amount of antibiotics they sell or distribute for use in food-producing animals. But the FDA cautions that this information does not necessarily represent actual use of products, since not all purchased antibiotics are used.Critics say better data are needed to create a more comprehensive picture of antibiotic use in food-producing animals and how it relates to antibiotic resistance.       Under FDA Guidance for Industry #213, drug sponsors are being asked to voluntarily remove growth promotion from the labels of all medically important antibiotics used in food animals starting in 2017. In addition, use of the drugs will require veterinary oversight. The FDA is hopeful this new policy will reduce the use of medically important antibiotics on farms.But some say ending the use of antibiotics for growth promotion isn’t enough. In September 2013, the NRDC and six other groups petitioned the FDA to withdraw approval of the use of medically important antibiotics in livestock and poultry for disease prevention, as well.See also:Dec 22 FDA summary reportDec 22 FDA news release on the reportDec 22 NRDC blog postlast_img read more

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Hildane for sale for £170m

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Derek Data Joins Dura International As Vice President Of Sales

first_img“The heart of every EV is the battery, so it was crucial for us to develop our own battery pack in-house,” said CEO Robert Bollinger. “Our engineering team has created a pack with high-strength structural properties, exemplary cooling features and state-of-the-art software.”  Bollinger Motors will manufacture battery packs for its own vehicles – as well as make them commercially available for standalone applications – starting in 2021. The Bollinger Motors battery pack is composed of modules in 35 kWh strings that can be connected in series or parallel to form a variety of pack sizes and configurations. Pack sizes will include 35, 70, 105, 140, 175 kWh, and higher, with many sizes capable of both 350V and 700V configurations.  The modules are connected to both sides of a symmetrical and structural I-beam. The I-beam includes channels, through which cooling fluid is pumped, to extract heat away from the battery modules. The I-beams also provide cross-vehicle structural support and help protect the pack from side intrusions.  Dura International has announced the appointment of Derek Data to the position of vice president of sales. In this role, Data will have responsibility for servicing customers and managing sales agencies in the Eastern U.S.AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisementData brings more than 20 years of experience, most recently as vice president of sales for Modern Silicone Technologies and Magnum Gaskets. His prior aftermarket experience also includes time with Federal-Mogul and Gencorp. Data has held key management roles that encompassed sales, finance, sourcing, strategic planning and operations.Dura International offers premium quality brake products and is headquartered in Rancho Dominguez, California, with distribution facilities in Memphis and Avenel, New Jersey.,Bollinger Motors has filed a patent with the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) for its battery pack design. The scope of the patent includes mechanical, electrical and systems-engineering innovations. AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisementcenter_img Designed for safety, high energy density, and high continuous power capacity, the Bollinger Motors battery pack will be suitable for heavier applications such as medium-duty trucks, agricultural and construction equipment. The Battery Management System (BMS) has also been developed in-house. The BMS has been created to handle any number of strings, therefore one BMS can be manufactured for all future battery-pack sizes and voltages.  The BMS monitors voltage, current, and temperature at multiple points within the pack and manages the system accordingly. It works with other vehicle-control units to maintain optimum operating conditions that increase efficiency and extend battery life. The BMS also provides several features which ensure system safety, including detecting and isolating faults to enable continued vehicle operation.Advertisement Bollinger Motors filed the provisional patent application on Oct. 12. The patent application number is 17/068,260.last_img read more

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Air Liquide acquires ADEP Assistance

first_imgSubscribe Get instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270.last_img

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