Catskill Chill Organizer Discusses Lake George Rumors [L4LM Exclusive]

first_imgWith last year’s “Farewell to Minglewood,” many fans have been wondering about the fate of the beloved Catskill Chill Music Festival in 2016. Last week, reporters picked up on an interesting tidbit about the Chill, as organizer Dave Marzollo met with the Board of Supervisors in Lake George, NY, about potentially bringing the festival to a new location.While Lake George may be where the festival settles, the plans are anything but set in stone. Marzollo agreed to discuss Chill’s plans with Live for Live Music, in an attempt to set the record straight. Here’s L4LM’s exclusive:L4LM: Thanks for chatting with us! How is the search going for a new location? What are you looking for in a new site?Dave Marzollo: The search for a new home for the Chill has been fun, to say the least.  We have scoured the northeast, trying to leave no stone unturned.  We have seen arenas, summer camps, towns, estates, farms, resorts, empty fields and even an airstrip in the middle of the woods.  I have had the opportunity to travel around with my best friends, scoping out venues, where each new site is a blank slate that will inevitably bring an entirely different feel.  It has been a real blast!  As for what we are looking for: Where to begin?  We look for a great concert field, prime attendee camping, ample attendee housing options, an accepting community, late-night rage-able venues, convenient parking and of course, a site that possesses the natural beauty that we have all grown accustomed to.L4LM: We recently learned that Catskill Chill was looking at a new location in Lake George, NY. How is that process going and how likely is the move?DM: I love the idea of the Chill at Lake George, but nothing has been decided, despite what you may have seen or heard. We have made many visits to this popular vacation destination and it is certainly one of the top choices for our beloved Chill.  That being said, I want to make sure that the ChillFam understands that this is not set in stone, by any means.  As I mentioned before, we are still looking at other locations, and we still need to overcome one or two minor red-tape hurdles in Lake George to confirm that this site is a viable option for us.  We won’t fully commit until we are one hundred percent certain that we have everything lined up perfectly for an amazing event.Catskill Chill 2015: Incredible Collaborations Put The Fam In ChillFamL4LM: Tell us about the new Lake George location. What makes it so attractive as a festival site?DM: This town has so much to offer: a gorgeous lakeside outdoor concert filed, a late-night indoor venue that is larger than our Minglewood Mainstage, where we can maintain our tradition of great music into the wee hours, comfortable and convenient camping that is close to the music, a welcoming local government, a beautiful public beach for fans to enjoy and over 4000 hotel rooms within walking distance of the concert venues.L4LM: Lake George isn’t in the Catskills. Any thoughts on a new name for the festival?DM: One of our founders, Josh Cohen, was the one to coin the name “Catskill Chill” so I wouldn’t want to make any bold proclamations until I have seen what new names he comes up with.  Besides, we will have to see just exactly where we land, before we can settle on a name.L4LM: Certainly one of the charming qualities of Catskill Chill is the camp-like feeling of attending. How does the new site carry on that legacy and what ideas do you have to further it?DM: I believe that it is not a site that makes the festival.  I believe that it is the people that make the event.  It starts with the enthusiasm of the artists and carries over into all of our passionate ChillFam and the way they embrace one another.  It is the vendors that have been with us from the first chill, and the staff that take such good care of our patrons.  Wherever we go, be it Lake George or somewhere else, we know that it is the sum of the members of our family that makes it “The Chill”.L4LM: With all the rumors we have heard and are likely to hear, how will the fans know what to believe?DM: As soon as we have a site locked in, we will make an announcement on our website, on our social media pages and we will put our blind faith tickets on sale.  Until then, I would not recommend anyone buy their plane tickets, reserve hotel rooms or take the days off from work.  Don’t worry, we are confident that we will have a definitive location and dates relatively soon.L4LM: What’s the one thing you’re most excited about for the Chill in 2016?DM: Well, that is an easy one.  I am most excited about the lineup.  I know that people are sometimes scared of change and we are standing on the brink of a major change.  We have often asked ourselves: “What can we do to ensure that all of our family makes the trip to somewhere new and unknown?” and in the end we realized it is actually pretty simple.  It is about the music – just like it has always been.  With that in mind, we have been brainstorming tirelessly on what we can do to not only bring top talent, but find new and exciting ways to present that talent.  I think that we have always been known for our creativity when it comes to our lineup and schedule and with what we have in store, we can only say that you ain’t seen nothin’ yet.  This will be our biggest, best and most dynamic lineup to date, we can certainly promise you that. Then again, it has also always been about the Chillfam, so the other thing I’m most looking forward to is the moment I see thousands of Chillfam dancing to their favorite bands and realizing that our “all love, all the time” mentality is defined by us, the Chillfam, and not any specific place or time.Thanks again to Dave Marzollo for taking the time out and answering our questions! We can’t wait for the Chill in 2016, wherever it may roam!last_img read more

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Tune in: Hendrick Motorsports unveils 2018 paint schemes Oct. 5

first_imgMORE: Bookmark this live-streaming linkCan’t wait to see Hendrick Motorsports drivers in their new paint schemes — and, in some cases, new car numbers? You won’t have to wait until 2018.Hendrick Motorsports will unveil the Daytona 500 schemes for all four team cars on Thursday, Oct. 5, with the event being live-streamed on NASCAR.com starting at 6:30 p.m. ET.Drivers Chase Elliott (No. 9), William Byron (No. 24), Jimmie Johnson (No. 48) and Alex Bowman (No. 88) will be on hand to pull the covers off their 2018 Chevrolet Camaro ZL1 cars, with special guests Bill Elliott, Jeff Gordon, Dale Earnhardt Jr. and Rick Hendrick.RELATED: More on Elliott, Byron | No. 24 car through the yearsThe reveal will be followed by a post-event show featuring interviews with the Hendrick Motorsports team.In addition, fans will have the opportunity to be there live and in-person via the NASCAR Hall of Fame — go here to learn how you can be there live.MORE: See full 2018 schedulelast_img read more

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Neil Young Makes Neil Young Archives Free For The Holidays

first_imgSanta Claus came early in the form of Neil Young, who reached into his never-ending sack of musical goodies that is the Neil Young Archives and pulled out free access for everyone. While it’s not clear at exactly which date NYA will revert to a premium service, the singer-songwriter announced that the service will be free through the holidays.In a post shared to the Neil Young Archives Instagram page, Young wrote, “Greetings/We are doing well here and feeling good. We hope you are well too. Our hearts go out to all those families touched. We want you to enjoy what we have to share at NYA.” He went on to say that, “Through the holidays NYA will be available for free to everyone on our desktop site.” With no specific end date to the offer, the best advice would be to soak up the content while you can.Related: Lukas Nelson & Promise Of The Real Cover Neil Young’s “Like An Inca” For ‘Soundcheck Songs’ Series [Video]This announcement comes on the heels of the mammoth Neil Young Archives Volume 2: 1972—1976, a 10-disc collection released last month. With all physical copies currently sold out, and the collection unavailable on other streaming services like Spotify or Apple Music, this may be the only chance for many to hear it for some time. The 131-song collection features 12 previously-unheard tracks, including a cover of Joni Mitchell‘s “Raised On Robbery”, and much more from one of the songwriter’s most productive periods.The act of charity also comes ahead of the release of Timeless Orpheum, which is coming soon to The Hearse Theater within the Neil Young Archives site. The concert film documents his show on January 28th, 2019, at the Orpheum Theater in Minneapolis which has yet to see an official release.In other Young news, he also dropped his copyright lawsuit against Donald Trump‘s re-election campaign for unauthorized use of his songs like “Rockin’ In The Free World” at his rallies. It appears that Young has certainly gotten into the holiday spirit this year. Head on over to the Neil Young Archives website to listen for free, courtesy of holly jolly Neil Young. [H/T Brooklyn Vegan]last_img read more

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States Put the ‘Home’ in Nursing Homes

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreThe Leonard Florence Center for Living in Chelsea, Mass., is part of what’s known as the Green House project, founded by geriatrician Dr. Bill Thomas as an alternative to traditional nursing  homes. Each apartment includes a large, centrally located kitchen and dining room designed to be the heart of the home. Residents often take part in meal planning and preparation.The Center, in a working-class neighborhood on the outskirts of Boston is technically a nursing facility — a place most people hope they can avoid. But for Rhoda Klein, age 79, this five-story urban complex feels like home. There’s a calm and comfortable atmosphere in Klein’s apartment, which she’s decorated with her own furnishings. Outside Klein’s door is a common area with an open kitchen, a fireplace and a long dining room table where other residents in her suite often hang out to talk or eat. The residents interact with their caregivers, assigned four at a time to the suite, with the ease of old friends. There aren’t many rules or schedules to follow. “I decide every morning what I want to do that day,” Klein says. “I can share group meals if I want to. Or play bingo and just have a snack. If I get hungry later, someone will make me a meal.”Klein’s nursing home lifestyle is also notable for what it isn’t. There’s no long gray linoleum corridors with doors that open onto shared rooms with nothing but a curtain between the beds. No beeping monitors or carts full of soiled linens and no patients in wheelchairs parked in the hallways. Few rules govern when, what and where residents can eat. The brand new facility is one of a new breed of small, homey nursing facilities cropping up around the country, thanks to state collaborations with the nursing home industry, federal regulators and advocates for the elderly and disabled. It looks like a place only wealthy families could afford, but about half of its residents get their bills paid by Medicaid, the federal-state health care program for the poor.Massachusetts played a big role in making the $37 million center in Chelsea possible. And it’s encouraging other nursing homes across the state to provide similar settings and more personalized services, whether in new buildings or traditional ones. In fact, nearly every state now is promoting what policymakers and advocates simply call “culture change” — creating environments for the aged and disabled that feel more home-like than institutional.But it isn’t easy to reverse habits and procedures or undo the architecture of institutions that have been around since the 1960s, when the enactment of Medicare and Medicaid spawned a major expansion of the nursing home industry.For millions of Americans — and state governments, too — the question of what kind of care nursing homes should provide will be impossible to avoid in the coming years. By 2020, the number of people aged 85 years and older — those most likely to need long-term care — will reach 15.4 million, up from 4.3 million in 2000, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. For states, nursing homes and other long-term care services represent more than 30 percent of a more than $320 billion annual Medicaid bill.The reason nursing homes have traditionally had an institutional feel to them is that most were designed in the mode of hospitals. That mentality extended to the physical space, leading to a standard two-wing design with a nurse’s station in the middle — a floor plan known in the industry as the “double-loaded corridor.” It also extended to the state regulations and rules governing everyday life in nursing homes. These tended to favor considerations for safety and medical care over concern for residents’ quality of life.As a result, frail elders in nursing homes have suffered from the “three plagues of boredom, helplessness and loneliness,” says Dr. Bill Thomas, a geriatric physician and a leader in the culture change movement. A self-described nursing home “abolitionist,” Thomas would like to see old-style nursing homes eliminated altogether.That won’t happen anytime soon. The nursing home industry is not growing; it’s shrinking. Despite an increase in the number of frail elders who need care, more are opting to remain at home or enter an assisted living facility where they can live more independently.According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, there are some 16,000 nursing homes in the United States, averaging about 30 years old with an occupancy rate of 86 percent. Most of them were designed the old way, and many will need renovation or replacement in the next decade. In their place, Thomas wants to see more small cottages or apartments like the one Klein lives in at the Leonard Florence Center — designed for 10 to 12 residents with skilled health care workers who give individual attention to each person. Thomas’ design has been replicated in 50 such facilities in 13 states, built with the support of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and NCB Capital Impact, a nonprofit community development organization. Dozens of other small nursing facilities have been built across the country with the same goals in mind, gaining support from private donations, and in some cases, direct state and federal grants.States are adopting new attitudes toward regulation so that facilities can create more home-like settings and give elders more privacy and control over their environment. Arkansas, for example, recently changed a rule that prevented residents from using air fresheners in their rooms. The state also got rid of a regulation that prevented nursing facilities from serving hot coffee from a cart early in the morning instead of making residents wait for a cold cup on their breakfast trays.It’s a lot of little things, says Carol Shockley, Arkansas director of long-term care. But they make a big difference in people’s daily lives. Residents especially appreciate having more control over what they eat. “If a resident just hates broccoli,” Shockely says, “a nursing home ought to be able to take it off his plate.”Workforce training is another important piece, because few health care workers have had experience with what is known in the culture change movement as “person-centered” care. Instead, they’ve typically performed just one of the services needed to support a frail elder or disabled adult.Massachusetts spent more than $200 million over an eight-year period to train and mentor health care workers in this new method of care, although that program has been cut back since the recession. Georgia, Kansas, Michigan, North Carolina, Oregon and Vermont made similar investments.States have found other ways to push culture change in nursing homes. Rhode Island has developed a survey that grades facilities based on whether they look more like an institution or a home, whether they allow residents flexibility in their sleeping and eating schedules and how well they’ve reduced annoying noises. Colorado pioneered a point system that bumps up Medicaid reimbursement rates for facilities that provide more home-like settings. Oklahoma has taken similar measures. Arkansas offers a higher Medicaid reimbursement rate for so-called “home-style” nursing homes.With all the budget cutting states have had to do in recent years, and will continue to have to do, it may be difficult for states to make a lot of progress in this area. Still, some are trying. Orinially published by Stateline.orgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

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Watch the ‘Magical’ Moment Epileptic Teen is Surprised With Her Own Therapy Dog for Her Birthday

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreFor years, Summer Shott has dreamt of one day owning her own dog – so when her parents finally surprised her with her own therapy dog, she could barely contain her emotions.Due to her medical issues, Summer’s doctor has encouraged the family to get her a therapy support dog in the past; because in addition to the London teen suffering from epilepsy, she also has hemiplegia as a result of being born with cerebral palsy.The condition means that Summer is almost constantly suffering from anxiety, which prevents her from doing a lot of the activities that other young girls are free to do. Since she has also been bullied for her medical conditions in the past, the youngster struggles with self-confidence. Her accumulative anxiety issues have had a history of triggering her epilepsy. After a recent string of seizures landed her in the hospital, doctors urged Summer’s family to consider getting her a therapy dog to reduce her anxiety.RELATED: After 12 Years of Waving to Students From Her Window, Watch Her Reaction to 400 Kids Saying GoodbyeSummer’s mother Cherie Johnson is allergic to furry animals – but with her daughter’s 16th birthday quickly approaching, she finally decided to surprise the teen with her very own support dog.With camera in hand to videotape the big reveal, Johnson broke the news to her daughter by giving her a birthday card with a message inside detailing her struggles in school. At the end of the card, Johnson instructed her daughter to life up a little flap of paper. Underneath the paper, it said that Summer was the proud new owner of her own therapy dog.Shocked, the teen could barely believe what she was hearing – and then her father walked in with Buddy the Chihuahua puppy wrapped in a towel.MORE: When Radio Station Hears About Mom Struggling to Care for Sick Son, They Give Her Surprise She Will Never ForgetSummer immediately started crying tears of happiness. Still in disbelief, the teen asked her mother several times “Is he really mine!?”Finally, the teen sits down on the sofa with her new canine companion in her arms – and the pup even touched noses with Summer as a way of saying hello.Since being given the puppy in April, Summer’s mental health has undergone a huge transformation.CHECK OUT: Woman Stunned to Find Out That ‘Anonymous’ Kidney Donor is Actually Her Best Friend“I knew Summer would be ecstatic, but her reaction was absolutely magical,” Johnson told Caters News Agency.“Since having him, she looks forward to the weekend, she’s got someone to look after rather than her always being looked after, and it’s given her so much confidence,” she added.“Her anxiety levels have dropped dramatically and she hasn’t had any of the bigger seizures since she came out of hospital.”(WATCH the emotional video below) Teenager Sheds Happy Tears After Receiving Surprise Support Dog0:00 / 0:00LoadingSurprise Your Friends With This Sweet Story By Sharing It To Social Media…AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

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Sue Minter statement on 5th anniversary of Tropical Storm Irene

first_imgSue Minter, Democratic candidate for governor: It’s hard to believe that anything good can come of a disaster. But five years after Tropical Storm Irene ravaged our brave little state, I travel with pride through a Vermont that is stronger and more resilient than it was before that terrible night when the flood waters rose.On this day five years ago, it was not assured that Vermont would recover well from the storm. What made the difference was the spirit of Vermonters. Everywhere I went, I encountered a remarkable depth of generosity and willingness to sacrifice for one another. The unsung heroes of Irene are the thousands of selfless volunteers: those who came forward to muck out homes, feed, clothe and rescue their neighbors; those who raised money and worked for months and years rebuilding over 700 homes for Irene survivors; those who rolled up their sleeves to rebuild communities ravaged by storm. We all honor the courageous survivors of the disaster, whose lives were turned upside down, but whose resilience and courage show us what it means to be Vermont Strong.Looking to the future, while Vermont does not face a natural disaster now, we do face many serious challenges. Seeing how we recovered from the worst disaster in nearly a century gives me hope. Because I have learned that when Vermonters come together, when we are all in, there is no such thing as impossible.last_img read more

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SYNNEX Adds Bose Professional to Its Suite of Bose Work Solutions

first_imgSYNNEX added Bose Professional to its suite of Bose Work solutions making the Bose Noise Cancelling Headphones 700 UC available to IT resellers and AV integrators. Customers also have access to Bose Work video bars, loudspeakers, amplifiers and processors.Bose Noise Cancelling Headphones 700 UC allow for collaboration in the office and beyond, offering work environment personalization and noise canceling, reliability in switching between audio sources and minimal interruptions with up to 20 hours of wireless battery life. SYNNEX customers can access the full Bose Work line card to support additional needs for remote, in-person and hybrid collaboration.last_img read more

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Here’s what the new mortgage rules mean for you

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr by. Gail HillebrandIt’s simple. Our new mortgage rules mean you will have more information and more protection when you’re shopping for a loan and while you own your home.In the run-up to the housing crisis, some lenders made loans without checking a borrower’s income, assets, or debts. That turned out to be a pretty bad idea. And, when many borrowers couldn’t repay their loans, the economy was hurt badly.Our new mortgage rules help change that. They’ll help protect you by requiring your lender to make a “good-faith, reasonable effort” to determine that you are likely to be able to repay your loan. That means the lender will check and verify your income, assets, debts, credit history, and other important financial information. And no more qualifying you based only on those initial “teaser” rates that trapped some consumers.More protectionsLenders who meet certain requirements for what we call Qualified Mortgages–or QMs– are presumed to have made that good-faith, reasonable effort to check your ability to repay. QMs have several characteristics that protect consumers. First, QMs can’t have risky features like negative amortization or no-interest periods. Second, QMs are available with some exceptions to borrowers who have a monthly debt-to-income ratio of 43 percent or less, meaning that the total of their monthly mortgage payment, plus other fixed debts like car loans, is not more than 43 percent of their monthly gross income. Most people taking out a mortgage now have a debt-to-income ratio of around 38 percent. continue reading »last_img read more

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Gopher football unveils a newer, cheaper ticket plan

first_imgGopher football unveils a newer, cheaper ticket planThe mobile pass gives fans tickets to all seven home games in 2019 for about $200.Jack Rodgers, Daily File PhotoA Gophers football player watches from the sidelines during a game on Sept. 16, 2017. Chad FaustJuly 8, 2019Jump to CommentsShare on FacebookShare on TwitterShare via EmailPrintAfter TCF Bank Stadium saw its lowest average attendance numbers on record in 2018, the University of Minnesota released its newest football ticket package on Monday — one aimed at luring more fans into the stadium seats.The new “Gopher Pass” will allow fans to attend all seven home games for the 2019 season for about $200. The University described it as the “most flexible plan ever” for Gophers fans in a press release sent out on Monday.The pass is an all-mobile ticket, and fans will have a digital ticket delivered to them by text message before each game. In the event of a sellout, the pass does not guarantee fans a seat in the game, just stadium entry and access to a standing-room-only area.Fans will pay an average of $28.56 per game, a considerable drop for marquee games such as the highly anticipated rivalry game against Wisconsin. The cheapest seat for the 2019 rivalry game on StubHub, a secondary market for tickets, is just under $70. The Gopher Pass is a part of a recent trend in University Athletics toward make games more affordable and inviting for fans.Earlier this year, the University decided to lower the season-ticket prices for both men’s basketball and men’s hockey games in an attempt to make sporting events more affordable.In June, University of Minnesota regents voted unanimously to allow alcohol sales in Williams Arena for basketball games and 3M Arena at Mariucci for hockey games, looking to boost attendance.The new plan is similar to one employed by the nearby Minnesota Twins. The Twins unveiled the “Twins Pass” for the 2019 season which allowed fans the option to pay for tickets on a monthly subscription-style basis with prices ranging from $49-$149 per month, giving them access to all the games. The Twins have seen their average attendance per game numbers climb to the highest it has been since 2015, due in large part to their success on the field.last_img read more

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