After the Eclipse, Emergency Rooms Treated People Who Put Sunscreen on Their Eyeballs

first_imgBecause apparently, after the eclipse, some emergency rooms had to treat people who put SUNSCREEN on their EYEBALLS. I guess some people were intelligent enough to pay attention to the warnings not to look at the eclipse without eye protection.  Unfortunately that’s where the intelligence ends . . . The odds are they won’t wind up with permanent damage from the sunscreen . . . but if they felt like it made it okay to look directly at the eclipse, then they COULD be in trouble.last_img

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SA landscape display takes root in UK

first_imgThe main entrance of the British Museum peeks over a display of Strelitzia reginae, the bird-of-paradise flower. The South Africa landscape takes shape. (Images: Kew) MEDIA CONTACTS • Steve RuddyKew head of garden development+44 20 8332 5000RELATED ARTICLES • Kew shows Africa’s plant wealth • SA scientists find plant barcode • Adopt a tree in Africa • World honour for SA botanistJanine ErasmusA recreated South African landscape, on show at the British Museum until October 2010, is giving Londoners a taste of the country’s rich biodiversity, and expats a taste of home.A joint project of the museum and the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew, the landscape is designed as a celebration of South Africa’s wealth of natural treasures. It coincides with the International Year of Biodiversity as well as the 2010 Fifa World Cup, which gets underway in Johannesburg in just under one month.The two institutions are aiming to promote understanding and respect for various cultures, and to heighten awareness of the need for biodiversity conservation around the world.The exhibit – which has a desert-like feel with sand, rocks and plants adapted for arid conditions – has been set up in the forecourt of the renowned historical and cultural institution and runs throughout the European summer, from the end of April until 10 October.Sponsored by Barclays, it’s open from 9h30 to 17h30 every day, and is free.Visitors will be able to wander among the indigenous plants and trees before moving inside and learning more about the country through the museum’s extensive South African and African galleries.Indigenous plantsAll plants and trees included in the display are native to South Africa.Highlights are the magnificent bird-of-paradise flower (Strelitzia reginae) – popular in flower arrangements, the prolific and dainty blue marguerite daisy (Felicia amelloides), and the quiver tree (Aloe dichotoma) – which grows in dry areas of South Africa and is favoured by the San Bushmen as quivers for their arrows.Other inclusions are the strange-looking bottle tree (Pachypodium lealii), the elephant’s foot yam (Dioscerea elephantipes), the mountain aloe (Aloe marlothii), hop bush (Dodonaea viscosa), red hot poker (Kniphofia caulescens), sweet thorn (Acacia karroo), and the cheerful yellow “Star of the Veldt” (Osteospermum hyoseroides), also a member of the daisy family.These curiosities are interspersed with a colourful display of popular South African plants, such as the African lily or agapanthus, the pelargonium or South Africa geranium – not to be confused with flowers of the geranium genus – and the prolific grower Carpobrotus, popularly known as sour fig. This plant has bright pink flowers and succulent triangle-shaped leaves, whose juice has a multitude of medicinal uses.Selected related items, such as rock art recreations and restios, which are part of the fynbos kingdom along with proteas and ericas, are scattered among the foliage.Careful planningKew’s Garden Development Unit head, Steve Ruddy, supervised the installation. All plants were shipped with the necessary permits and were sourced with the help of nurseries in South Africa. They underwent a strict examination to eliminate the risk of transporting insects or diseases, and were then wrapped with great care before being shipped to the UK in a temperature-controlled container.The journey by sea took a little less than the anticipated three weeks and the plants arrived in late March. Landscaping, which began on 29 March, took four weeks to complete.While construction was still underway, the UK weather threatened to turn frosty, forcing botanical staff to protect the ill-adapted plants with a cover of fleecy cloth.Once the landscape is dismantled, the plants will be given to the council of Camden, the London borough where the British Museum is located, to be planted in the area. Kew, meanwhile, will take in any specimens that may not survive the notoriously gloomy UK winter.A number of events have been planned to add value to the exhibition, including talks by Kew and British Museum experts on rock art, traditional uses of plants, conservation and more.African plant wealthEarlier in 2010 Kew reported that East and tropical Southern Africa were treasure troves of the botanical world, yielding more new species in 2009 than anywhere else. Of the 292 new species, two were discovered in South Africa. The greatest number – 67 – came from Tanzania.The botanical institution has a number of projects running in Southern Africa, with the cooperation of partners in the region. These include the Millennium Seed Bank project – which is helping to save endangered plants in South Africa, Botswana and Namibia by conserving seed, ongoing research into propagation of threatened plants, and a database of South Africa plant DNA.One of Kew’s most significant projects is one based near Grahamstown in the Eastern Cape province, which is promoting the sustainable use of plants for traditional purposes such as medicine, clothing, food and craft.The communities in this area have been hard hit by HIV/Aids and the demand for traditional medicine, to complement antiretroviral treatment, is high. Careful management of resources will ensure that there are enough plants to meet the needs of every patient.last_img read more

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a month agoSolskjaer: Man Utd rebuild no quick-fix. Rome wasn’t built in a day

first_imgSolskjaer: Man Utd rebuild no quick-fix. Rome wasn’t built in a dayby Paul Vegasa month agoSend to a friendShare the loveManchester United boss Ole Gunnar Solskjaer has called for patience as he continues the rebuilding process.A concerning start to the campaign has seen United take just six points from their first eight Premier League games, while the club haven’t won the title since 2013. Solskjaer told Sky Sports: “It’s not like the situation we had last year. There’s no lack of desire there. “For us it’s about building a new culture, building a new team, bringing everybody together. Is it the job I expected? Yes. I never said this was going to be a quick-fix job. It’s step after step after step. “Of course, we’ve hit a few bumps in the road, I never said this was going to be a quick-fix job. Rome wasn’t built in a day. “We need time, and the attitude of the boys has been great. [We must] keep working on improving the understanding and relationships between all players, and the style we want to play.” About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

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NIH awards 34 million to UC researchers to study gastrointestinal lymphatic system

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Nov 15 2018A team of researchers at the University of Cincinnati (UC) College of Medicine have been awarded $3.4 million by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to study the role of the gastrointestinal (GI) lymphatic system in dietary nutrient absorption and the transport of signaling molecules.The lymphatic system is a network of vascular channels that enable the return of lymph–colorless fluid containing white blood cells that bathes the tissues and drains through the lymphatic system into the bloodstream, back to the circulatory system. In the gastrointestinal tract, the lymphatic circulation has the added function of transporting the triglyceride rich chylomicrons, various hormones and signaling molecules secreted by the cells of the gastrointestinal tract.Related StoriesIT Faces the Digital Pathology Data TsunamiAn active brain and body associated with reduced risk of dementiaBordeaux University Hospital uses 3D printing to improve kidney tumor removal surgery”Compared to other systems, cardiac or respiratory, we currently have a relatively poor understanding of the physiological significance of the GI lymphatic system, necessary for normal functioning of the GI tract and overall metabolic health,” says principal investigator Patrick Tso, PhD, professor and Mary M. Emery Chair of Pathology in the medical college’s Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine and director of the Cincinnati Mouse Metabolic Phenotyping Center. Yvonne Ulrich-Lai, PhD, associate professor of pharmacology and systems physiology, and Min Liu, PhD, professor of pathology and laboratory medicine, are co-principal investigators on the study.The GI lymphatic system, Tso says, may turn out to be a critical area of study relevant to diabetes.For example, he says that when patients undergo bariatric surgery, in most cases, their diabetes is reversed quickly, well before they start to lose weight. Ulrich-Lai, Liu and Tso believe that a disturbance of the lymphatic circulation may be involved in this very interesting clinical finding.In this study, researchers will create a similar disruption of the drainage of the lymphatic system in an animal model to assess its impact on metabolic health.”We hope to shed light on the mechanism involved in reversing diabetes by bariatric surgery,” says Tso.Tso joined the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at the UC College of Medicine in 1996 as professor of pathology and an adjunct appointment in the Department of Physiology. Tso’s career there has included positions as associate director of the Obesity Research Center; director of the NIH-funded Cincinnati Mouse Metabolic Phenotyping Center and director of the Center for Lipid Research. In 2010, he received the Daniel Drake Medal, the highest honor bestowed to a faculty at the College of Medicine.The five-year, $3.4 million, grant comes from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) (1RO1DK119135-01).The investigators cite no conflicts of interest. Source:http://healthnews.uc.edu/news/?/30319/last_img read more

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New review shows a clear gap in understanding of cancer in LGBTI

first_imgLGBTI adolescents and teens are already challenged by barriers to healthcare access. Add a life-threatening cancer diagnosis, and you can see that the burden is enormous. We must not tolerate poorer outcomes for this group with unique needs; we must acknowledge the problem, we must identify the risks, and we must adapt our practice of medicine accordingly.”Leonard S. Sender, MD, Editor-in-Chief of JAYAO, University of California, Irvine and CHOC Children’s Hospital Hyundai Cancer Institute, Orange, CA Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jun 26 2019A new systemic review of the literature has shown a clear gap in the understanding of cancer in lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and/or intersex (LGBTI) adolescents and young adults (AYA). The knowledge that LGBTI adults with cancer face unique disparities in healthcare access and poorer outcomes, and that LGBTI AYA have difficulty accessing health services, led a group of researchers to propose that LGBTI young people with cancer likely represent an at-risk patient population. The researchers issue a Call to Action aimed at reducing gaps in AYA cancer care, published in a Perspective article in Journal of Adolescent and Young Adult Oncology (JAYAO), a multidisciplinary peer-reviewed publication from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. Click here to read the full-text article free on the Journal of Adolescent and Young Adult Oncology (JAYAO) website through July 24, 2019.Related StoriesStudy reveals link between inflammatory diet and colorectal cancer riskSpecial blood test may predict relapse risk for breast cancer patientsNew study to ease plight of patients with advanced cancerThe article entitled “Overlooked Minorities: The Intersection of Cancer in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and/or Intersex Adolescents and Young Adults” was coauthored by Mairghread Clarke, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre (Melbourne), and colleagues from The University of Melbourne and Royal Melbourne Hospital, Melbourne Health, Australia.The researchers remark on the special challenges that can accompany cancer during the developmental years of adolescence and young adulthood, including issues such as body image, mental health, and youths’ emerging independence and autonomy. All of these can further compound the difficulties faced by AYAs with cancer who identify as LGBTI. The article provides a detailed look at broader LGBTI health disparities, discrepancies in access to care, and health service barriers. The Call to Action offers a blueprint for change that begins with acknowledging the risks, identifying the challenges, and specifying recommendations to lessen the gap. Source:Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering NewsJournal reference:Clarke, M. et al. (2019) Overlooked Minorities: The Intersection of Cancer in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and/or Intersex Adolescents and Young Adults. Journal of Adolescent and Young Adult Oncology. doi.org/10.1089/jayao.2019.0021last_img read more

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Dubai splashes billions on mega projects ahead of Expo

The value of Expo-related projects underway hit $42.5 billion in March, according to the Construction Intelligence Report.It said that $17.4 billion were invested in infrastructure and transport projects, $13.2 billion on housing and $11 billion for hotels and theme parks.The projects include an $8 billion expansion of Al Maktoum International Airport—located at the southern pole of the city and tipped to complement Dubai International Airport to the north.Dubai airport was the world’s busiest for international travel in 2017, handling more than 88 million travellers. Al Maktoum, when complete, will have the capacity to handle 160 million travellers per year. The emirate is spending $2.9 billion to develop a new metro line that will link its main transport hubs to the Expo site.The new line will also link the $13.4 billion Dubai South Villages and Dubai Exhibition City, projects currently underway.Authorities expect Expo 2020 to boost the real estate market and the hospitality sector, creating up to 300,000 new jobs and energising the economy. The six-month event, the first World Expo to be staged in the Middle East, is expected to attract up to 300,000 visitors per day, half of them from abroad, when it opens in October 2020, according to the Dubai Chamber of Commerce and Industry.Dubai, a city state which has established itself as a regional business hub and tourism destination, has the Gulf’s most diversified economy that is not dependent on oil.The economy of Dubai, where the population of three million people is comprised mainly of foreigners, is based on finance, property, tourism and leisure.Over 21 percent of this year’s public spending of $15.5 billion is earmarked for infrastructure projects. Oil income contributes just six percent to public revenues. Explore further © 2018 AFP Dubai, home to Burj Al Arab, the world’s tallest building, is splashing billions in order to host Expo 2020 which authorities hope will boost the real estate market and the hospitality sector in the city state Citation: Dubai splashes billions on mega projects ahead of Expo (2018, April 8) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-04-dubai-splashes-billions-mega-expo.html Dubai is splashing tens of billions of dollars on infrastructure and hospitality projects related to the international trade fair Expo 2020, Dubai-based BNC Network said in a report published Sunday. French PM oversees major Airbus deal signed in Dubai This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. read more

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11 killed in Mumbai building collapse rescue on as many still trapped

first_img Next 11 killed in Mumbai building collapse, rescue operations continue as many still trapped under debris: 10 pointsYet another dilapidated building in the congested parts of Mumbai collapsed on Tuesday morning, killing at least 11 people while many are still feared trapped.advertisement India Today Web Desk New DelhiJuly 16, 2019UPDATED: July 17, 2019 00:03 IST Rescue workers pull out a victim from the rubble at the site of a collapsed building in Mumbai. (Image: Reuters)Mumbai was met with yet another disaster on Tuesday when a dilapidated building in Dongri area collapsed taking down over 10-12 families along with it. Rescue workers have managed to pull out 11 bodies so far after working continuously since afternoon.At least 40 people were feared trapped when the unauthorised building collapsed in the congested bylanes of Dongri.This comes in a series of similar collapses that plagued the city of Mumbai, the buzzing financial capital of India, in the monsoon season.In another incident on July 2, 29 people were killed in Malad when a wall collapsed on cluster of houses behind it. Over 70 people were injured in the incident as the city battled a record-breaking volume of rainfall.On Tuesday, Mumbai relieved the nightmare once again as rescue operations continued even in the dark. Many are still feared trapped. Image: ReutersHere are the top developments:1. An unauthorised four-storey building in south Mumbai’s congested Dongri locality collapsed, killing at least 11 people and trapping more than 40 people under the debris. The National Disaster Response Force (NDRF) said six men, four women and a child were killed while eight were injured.2. The collapse was reported by locals around 11 am on Tuesday. Even over 12 hours after the collapse, rescue efforts are on as many are still feared trapped below the mound of debris.3. The building was unauthorised and officials of the Maharashtra Housing and Area Development Authority (MHADA) quickly shun responsibility and said that it was not under its supervision.4. Activists demanded stern action against civic officials after the major accident. On the other hand, several letters released by both BMC and MHADA show that both the agencies were aware of the situation in the Kesarbai building but failed to do much.5. The congested lanes and narrow entrances made it even difficult for fire and NDRF personnel to reach the accident site. Before the personnel could reach, locals had already started with the rescue operations and started removing the bricks and slabs with bare hands. Scores of locals joined in the effort, forming a human chain to remove the debris.6. At least 10-15 families lived in the building that came crashing on Tuesday afternoon without the slightest warning.7. Several politicians, ministers and legislators made a beeline into the already congested lanes and made the rescue efforts even more difficult.8. Dramatic visuals of rescue personnel pulling out children, babies and hapless people out of the rubble started doing the rounds on social media as the rescue efforts gathered steam through the day.9. There were many anxious, frantic moments as family members of those missing waited for some news, their hopes dimming with each passing hour.10. Prime Minister Narendra Modi and Home Minister Amit Shah expressed anguish over the loss of lives in a building collapse incident in Mumbai.Also Watch | Dongri building collapse: Why life is so cheap in Mumbai?For the latest World Cup news, live scores and fixtures for World Cup 2019, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for World Cup news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted bySanchari Chatterjeelast_img read more

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These Odd Quasiparticles Could Finally Unmask Dark Matter

first_img The 18 Biggest Unsolved Mysteries in Physics Paul M. Sutter is an astrophysicist at The Ohio State University, host of Ask a Spaceman and Space Radio, and author of Your Place in the Universe. Originally published on Live Science.by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeVikings: Free Online GamePlay this for 1 min and see why everyone is addicted!Vikings: Free Online GameUndoDr. Marty Nature's Feast SupplementWhy Certain Cats Are Fatter Than OthersDr. Marty Nature’s Feast SupplementUndoLCR Health SupplementIs A Confused Metabolism Causing You To Gain Weight?LCR Health SupplementUndoTop 10 Best Meal DeliveryMeal Kit Wars: 10 Tested & Ranked. See Who WonTop 10 Best Meal DeliveryUndoLivestlyDear Seniors And Retirees, These Dog Breeds Are RecommendedLivestlyUndoSimbalyWorld’s First Surviving Octuplets Are All Grown Up. Look At Them 9 Years LaterSimbalyUndo 9 Ideas About Black Holes That Will Blow Your Mind About 80% of all the matter in the cosmos is of a form completely unknown to current physics. We call it dark matter, because as best we can tell it’s…dark. Experiments around the world are attempting to capture a stray dark matter particle in hopes of understanding it, but so far they have turned up empty. Recently, a team of theorists has proposed a new way to hunt for dark matter using weird “particles” called magnons, a name I did not just make up. These tiny ripples could lure even a fleeting, lightweight dark matter particle out of hiding, those theorists say. [The 11 Biggest Unanswered Questions About Dark Matter] The dark matter puzzle We know all sorts of things about dark matter, with the notable exception of what it is.Headbutting Tiny Worms Are Really, Really LoudThis rapid strike produces a loud ‘pop’ comparable to those made by snapping shrimps, one of the most intense biological sounds measured at sea.Your Recommended PlaylistVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9接下来播放Why Is It ‘Snowing’ Salt in the Dead Sea?01:53 facebook twitter 发邮件 reddit 链接https://www.livescience.com/65887-quasiparticles-could-unmask-dark-matter.html?jwsource=cl已复制直播00:0000:3500:35  Even though we can’t directly detect it, we see the evidence of dark matter as soon as we open up our telescopes to the wider universe. The first revelation, way back in the 1930s, came through observations of galaxy clusters, some of the largest structures in the universe. The galaxies that inhabited them were simply moving too quickly to be held together as a cluster. That’s because the collective mass of the galaxies gives the gravitational glue that keeps the cluster together — the greater the mass, the stronger that glue. A super-strong glue can hold together even the fastest moving galaxies. Any faster and the cluster would simply rip itself apart. But there the clusters were, existing, with galaxies buzzing around within them far faster than they should given the mass of the cluster. Something had enough gravitational grip to hold the clusters together, but that something was not emitting or interacting with light. This mystery persisted unresolved through the decades, and in the 1970s astronomer Vera Rubin upped the ante in a big way through observations of stars within galaxies. Once again, things were moving too fast: Given their observed mass, the galaxies in our universe should’ve spun themselves apart billions of years ago. Something was holding them together. Something unseen. [11 Fascinating Facts About Our Milky Way Galaxy] The story repeats all across the cosmos, both in time and space. From the earliest light from the Big Bang to the largest structures in the universe, something funky is out there. Searching in the dark So dark matter is very much there — we just can’t find any other viable hypothesis to explain the tsunami of data in support of its existence. But what is it? Our best guess is that dark matter is some kind of new, exotic particle, hitherto unknown to physics. In this picture, dark matter floods every galaxy. In fact, the visible portion of a galaxy, as seen through stars and clouds of gas and dust, is just a tiny lighthouse set against a much larger, darker shore. Each galaxy sits within a large “halo” made up of zillions upon zillions of dark matter particles. These dark matter particles are streaming through your room right now. They’re streaming through you. A never-ending rain shower o’ tiny, invisible dark matter particles. But you simply don’t notice them. They don’t interact with light or with charged particles. You are made of charged particles and you are very friendly with light; you are invisible to dark matter and dark matter is invisible to you. The only way we “see” dark matter is through the gravitational force; gravity notices every form of matter and energy in the universe, dark or not, so at the largest scales, we observe the influence of the combined mass of all these countless particles. But here in your room? Nothing. Unless, we hope, there’s some other way that dark matter interacts with us normal matter. It’s possible that the dark matter particle, whatever the heck it is, also feels the weak nuclear force — which is responsible for radioactive decay — opening up a new window into this hidden realm. Imagine building a giant detector, just a big mass of whatever element you have handy. Dark matter particles stream through it, almost all of them completely harmlessly. But sometimes, with a rarity depending on the particular model of dark matter, the passing particle interacts with one of the atomic nuclei of the elements in the detector via the weak nuclear force, knocking it out of place and making the entire mass of the detector quiver. Enter the magnon This experimental setup works only if the dark matter particle is relatively heavy, giving it enough oomph to knock out a nucleus in one of those rare interactions. But so far, none of the dark matter detectors around the globe have seen any trace of an interaction, even after years and years of searching. As the experiments have ground along, the allowable properties of dark matter have slowly been ruled out. This isn’t necessarily a bad thing; we simply don’t know what dark matter is made of, so the more we know about what it isn’t, the clearer the picture of what it could be. But the lack of results can be a little bit worrying. The heaviest candidates for dark matter are getting ruled out, and if the mysterious particle is too light, it will never be seen in the detectors as they’re set up right now. That is, unless there’s another way that dark matter can talk to regular matter. In a recent article published in the preprint online journal arXiv, physicists detail a proposed experimental setup that could spot a dark matter particle in the act of changing the spin of electrons (if, in fact, dark matter can do that). In this setup, dark matter can potentially be detected, even if the suspect particle is very light. It can do this by creating so-called magnons in the material. Pretend you have a chunk of material at a temperature of absolute zero. All the spins — like tiny little bar magnets — of all the electrons in that matter will point in the same direction. As you slowly raise the temperature, some of the electrons will start to wake up, wiggle around and randomly point their spins in the opposite direction. The higher you raise the temperature, the more electrons wind up flipped — and each of those flips reduces the magnetic strength by just a little bit. Each of those flipped spins also causes a little ripple in the energy of the material, and those wiggles can be viewed as a quasiparticle, not a true particle, but something you can describe with math in that way. These quasiparticles are known as “magnons,” probably because they’re like tiny, cute little magnets. So if you start off with a really cold material, and enough dark matter particles strike the material and flip some spins around, you’ll observe magnons. Because of the sensitivity of the experiment and the nature of the interactions, this setup can detect a lightweight dark matter particle. That is, if it exists. The 11 Biggest Unanswered Questions About Dark Matterlast_img read more

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Kashmir parties for simultaneous assembly LS polls

first_imgSHARE Published on COMMENT March 04, 2019 Jammu and Kashmir Chief Election Commissioner Sunil Arora (file photo)center_img COMMENTS The political parties of Kashmir on Monday impressed upon the Election Commission of India (ECI) to hold the assembly polls in Jammu and Kashmir simultaneously with the upcoming Lok Sabha elections. The ECI on Monday began a two-day visit to the state to assess the feasibility of holding the Lok Sabha and the assembly polls simultaneously. Delegations of National Conference, Peoples’ Democratic Party, Pradesh Congress Committee and other smaller parties met the ECI team headed by Chief Election Commissioner Sunil Arora to put forth their views about holding of assembly elections in the state.Hold elections ‘as soon as possible’The officials said the team will leave for Jammu later in the day and hold similar interactions there tomorrow. “We impressed upon the Election Commission that there is no reason why Assembly elections cannot be held simultaneously with the Lok Sabha elections. Not holding assembly polls will send wrong signals to people within and outside the state,” NC leader Nasir Aslam Wani, who was part of his party’s delegation, told PTI after the meeting. Wani said the NC delegation informed the commission that restoration of an elected government in the state was urgently needed as the Governor’s administration was taking decisions on matters with widespread implications. PDP delegation leader Abdul Rehman Veeri said his party also wanted an early election to the state assembly so that a people’s government is put in place. Asked if PDP delegation had sought assembly polls be held alongside Lok Sabha elections, Veeri was non-committal. “The elections should be held as soon as possible,” he said.‘Bureaucrats’ government’Congress leader Taj Mohiuddin said his party delegation highlighted the fact that holding assembly elections together with Lok Sabha elections can lead to higher voter turnout as was witnessed in 2008 assembly polls. “We told the Election Commission how in 2008 assembly elections a high voter turnout was witnessed when people doubted about holding the polls. Our stand was that the Commission has all the data about security deployment in 2008 and it should be easy for them to assess the requirements for this year’s election as well,” he said. Mohiudding said while the Governor’s administration might be doing its job well, President’s Rule cannot be an alternative to an elected government in terms of redressal of problems faced by the people. “The MLAs are the link between the government and the people and no one can replace this link. The government under President’s Rule is bureaucrats’ government. They are not accessible to common people,” he said. CPI(M) delegation led by M Y Tarigami told the Commission that the democratic process in Jammu and Kashmir should be resumed at the earliest and advocated holding Lok sabha and state assembly polls together in the state. “Jammu and Kashmir state is without an elected government for the past nine months and in the absence of an elected government, uncertainty in the state is deepening day-by-day and dissatisfaction among large section of people is increasing,” Tarigami said.“Only effective response to this situation is to initiate democratic process and hold elections to Assembly and Lok Sabha simultaneously. Any delay to do so will hamper the process of improvement in the situation,” he added.Assessing ground realities The ECI team, headed by Chief Election Commissioner Sunil Arora, began interactions with political parties soon after their arrival in the summer capital, officials said. They said the team will meet with officials of the state government, including the Deputy Commissioners and the district police chiefs, to get a briefing on the security situation in the state.The state is currently under President’s Rule since December 19, 2018 which was necessitated at the end of the six month period under Governor’s Rule imposed on 19 June 2018. The PDP-BJP government in the state fell on June 19 after the national party pulled out of the coalition. SHARE SHARE EMAIL electionslast_img read more

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UP law panel drafts stringent law for mob lynching recommends life term

first_imgOther Videos from India 26:36 Sat, 13 Jul, 2019 20 Years of Kargil: A ground report from Tololing in Drass 01:59 Sat, 13 Jul, 2019 First prototype of Brahmos-NG will be ready by 2024 00:41 Sat, 13 Jul, 2019 Watch: Car performs stunt at Delhi’s Vijay Chowk 03:16 Sat, 13 Jul, 2019 Pakistan removes 5 Pro-Khalistani leaders from Kartarpur corridor panel 02:13 Sat, 13 Jul, 2019 Enter the Growler: S-400 missile ground report from Moscow 03:31 Fri, 12 Jul, 2019 Delhi: Farmers of Khera Khurd shift their tubewells due to depleting water levels 09:13 Fri, 12 Jul, 2019 BJP is using money power: Abhishek Manu Singhvi on Karnataka crisis 02:41 Fri, 12 Jul, 2019 Nataka in Karnataka: Rahul Gandhi breaks his silence, says BJP using money power to topple govts Load More Other Video CategoriesIndiaSportsWorldMoviesSo SorryTelevisionlast_img read more

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