Ottawa MPP MarieFrance Lalonde seeks federal seat after Leslie retires

first_imgOTTAWA — Ontario Liberal politician Marie-France Lalonde wants to run for Parliament to replace retired general Andrew Leslie in the Ottawa riding he’s vacating after just one term.Lalonde announced her intention to run federally Monday, saying she’s giving up thoughts of seeking the leadership of the Ontario Liberals because she wants to focus on her east-Ottawa community.Leslie was a top-tier adviser to Justin Trudeau in the lead-up to the 2015 election, bringing decades of military experience and gravitas to the then third-place Liberals on defence and foreign policy.But he never made it into Trudeau’s cabinet and announced two weeks ago that he wouldn’t run for a second term.Lalonde is a former social worker and retirement-home operator who became a cabinet minister in former premier Kathleen Wynne’s government as a rookie MPP.She was re-elected comfortably in the Ontario election a year ago that saw the Liberals reduced to a rump of seven members at Queen’s Park, without enough seats to qualify as a party in the legislature.The area both Leslie and Lalonde represent, Orleans, is a suburban swing riding that’s elected both Liberals and Conservatives. It’s known for its large population of public servants, military members and veterans.“I am asking the people of Orleans to put their faith in me again,” Lalonde said. “The federal government is a major employer in our riding, and I want to fight for Orleans and deal with issues that matter to us — as employees, as citizens, for growth, for jobs, and for a prosperous community.”The Canadian Presslast_img read more

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BaTboT is up for imitating smart bat maneuvers

first_img © 2012 Phys.Org Explore further The interest in bats is because of the way bats change the shape of their wings, which has potential for improving the maneuverability of these air devices. Julian Colorado and colleagues at the Polytechnic University of Madrid, Spain and at Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island, built the drone with an end goal in mind—more agile, autonomous robots making more agile moves than can fixed wing aircraft. Colorado said that trying to mimic that level of functionality requires analysis of bat flight and novel technologies, ranging from design to control issues. Colorado’s team refers to their device officially as the “BaTboT” robot. They make use of shape memory alloys as muscle like actuators, behaving as biceps and triceps along the wing-skeleton structure of the robot. The wing extends and contracts under the control of the shape-memory alloy wires that switch between two shapes when different currents are applied. The wires, between the “shoulder” and “elbow” of the robot, rotate the elbow, pulling in the “fingers” to slim the wing profile on the upstroke. This contracts and extends the wings in a similar way to the biological counterpart, said Colorado. The device’s wingspan was inspired by a specific type of bat, the grey-headed flying fox, the largest bat in Australia. The US military partly funded this research. The paper presenting the design of this bat-like air vehicle is “Biomechanics of smart wings in a bat robot morphing wings using SMA actuators.” Authors are J Colorado, A Barrientos, C Rossi and K S Breuer. A professor of engineering, Breuer is from the School of Engineering at Brown and he has been studying bats for over ten years. “There is growing interest in the energy cost of flight,” according to Breuer. Understanding bat flight can help further the continued development in small, unmanned flying vehicles“Bats have evolved with truly extraordinary aerodynamic capabilities that enable them to fly in dense swarms, to avoid obstacles, and to fly with such agility that they can catch prey on the wing, maneuver through thick rainforests and make high speed 180 degree turns,” according to notes from Brown University’s notes on Bat Flight Research. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: BaTboT is up for imitating smart bat maneuvers (2012, June 3) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-06-batbot-imitating-smart-maneuvers.html More information: The design is said to be encouraging, as an example of how robot construction can move from rigid components toward bionic systems made from softer materials and artificial muscles. (Phys.org) — Robotics researchers in Spain and the U.S. are studying bats for their design work on drones. Bat wings are highly articulated, with skeletons similar to those of human arms and hands. The researchers have built a drone that mimics the way a bat changes its wing shape in flight. Bats achieve an “amazing” level of maneuverability, says a researcher, mainly because of their capacity of changing wing morphology during flight. Specifically, the “Batbot” replicates the way a bat changes the profile of its wing between the downstroke and upstroke. By folding wings toward their bodies on the upstroke, bats use 35 percent less energy and reduce aerodynamic drag, according to researchers at Brown. sites.google.com/a/brown.edu/f … /bat-flight-researchwww.disam.upm.es/~jdcolorado/BAT/BaTboT.html Bats save energy by drawing in wings on upstroke: studylast_img read more

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A BoseEinstein condensate has been produced in space for the first time

first_imgThe device consisted of a capsule containing a chip holding a group of rubidium-87 atoms, electronics, some lasers and a power source. It was activated once the rocket reached an altitude of 243 km, producing a BEC in just 1.6 seconds. Once the BEC was produced, 110 preprogrammed experiments were carried out in the six minutes it took the rocket to fall back to Earth.The BEC produced by the team was the first ever produced in space and marks the start of a new era in BEC research efforts. An international team of researchers has successfully produced a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) in space for the first time. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the group describes creating a small experimental device that was carried on a rocket into space and the experiments that were conducted during its freefall. The payload of the sounding rocket in the integration hall at the European Space and Sounding Rocket Range (Esrange) in Sweden Credit: photo/©: André Wenzlawski, JGU Journal information: Nature Explore further Payload of the sounding rocket and all those involved in the undertaking, among them scientists of the MAIUS-1 project, employees of the German Aerospace Center, and employees of the Esrange rocket launch site Credit: photo/©: Thomas Schleuss, DLR More information: Dennis Becker et al. Space-borne Bose–Einstein condensation for precision interferometry, Nature (2018). DOI: 10.1038/s41586-018-0605-1center_img A Bose-Einstein condensate is a state of matter occurring after gas atoms with very low density are chilled to very near absolute zero and bunch up to form an extremely dense quantum state. Scientists are interested in producing them so that they can test their properties—theory has suggested that they could serve as the basis for highly sensitive sensors. Such super-sensitive sensors could be used to better understand physics phenomena such as gravitational waves. However, producing Bose-Einstein condensates is tricky, because gravity interferes with devices for producing and studying them. The current method involves dropping such devices from towers to allow them to do their work in a zero-gravity environment—but these experiments have just fractions of seconds to operate. Doing these experiments in space would be a much better option due to the microgravity environment.Realizing the potential of a space-based platform for conducting BEC research, the U.S. launched the Cold Atom Laboratory last May, though it is not yet fully functional. In the interim, the researchers with this new effort created a tiny device capable of producing a BEC and conducting a host of experiments on it, which they put aboard a rocket and launched into space. © 2018 Phys.org This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: A Bose-Einstein condensate has been produced in space for the first time (2018, October 18) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-10-bose-einstein-condensate-space.html Researchers are creating a spot colder than the vacuum of space inside the International Space Stationlast_img read more

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