Circumnavigation

first_imgBy Raphael G. Satter THE ASSOCIATED PRESS LONDON – He was hit by a car in Colorado, attacked by a crocodile in Australia, detained as a suspected spy in Egypt and survived illness and periods of despair. On Saturday, British adventurer Jason Lewis finally came home, completing a 13-year, 46,000-mile human-powered circumnavigation of the globe. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREChargers go winless in AFC West with season-ending loss in Kansas CityThe 40-year-old carried his 26-foot yellow pedal craft the last few miles up the River Thames, pushing it across the Meridian Line at Greenwich, where his expedition began in 1994. “I’m overwhelmed,” Lewis told Sky News television after arriving. He struggled for words as he described his feelings at the close of an odyssey that took him around the globe, powered only by his arms and legs – on a bicycle, a pedal boat, a kayak and inline skates. “It’s been my life, for 13 years, I’ve put everything into this,” he said. “To be honest I didn’t know it was going to happen. There were many times in the trip where it should have failed.” Lewis was recruited by fellow adventurer Steve Smith, who first dreamed up the idea of going around the world using only human power in 1991. The pair had little experience at sea, but Lewis thought the prospect of hiking and biking across the world was “wildly romantic.” “The three and a half years the expedition was projected to take sounded like an acceptable amount of time to rejuvenate from the wearisome London scene without totally going AWOL,” Lewis wrote on the expedition’s Web site. Trouble began early. After two years of planning and fundraising, the pair set out in July 1994 only to get “horribly lost” on their way to the English coastal town of Rye, where their pedal boat was waiting. After crossing the English Channel to France and then cycling to Portugal, the pair pedaled their boat in shifts across the Atlantic Ocean, reaching Miami in February 1995. Along the way, they survived close encounters with a shrimping trawler, a whale and a giant wave that swept Smith overboard. By the time they reached America, the two adventurers had been cooped up in a broom closet-sized space for 111 days with little in the way of food, and their relationship had begun to deteriorate. They crossed the U.S. separately, with Lewis strapping on his inline skates for the 3,500-mile trip to San Francisco. It was on this leg of the journey that he was hit by a car in Pueblo, Colo., breaking both legs. He spent nine months recuperating. Smith and Lewis reunited in San Francisco and eventually pedaled from the Golden Gate Bridge to Hawaii, where the two split for good. Smith went on to write a book, Pedaling to Hawaii, while Lewis continued on to Australia. He biked across the Australian Outback, dodged supertankers in the Singapore straits and hiked the Himalayas. From Mumbai, India, he pedaled his boat across the Indian Ocean to Djibouti and made his way north by bicycle through Sudan and Egypt. Accidents and sickness dogged the trip. The collision in Colorado nearly cost Lewis his leg. The trip across the Pacific left him sore, inflamed and depressed. While kayaking across the Barrier Reef off Australia, he was attacked by a crocodile, which bit off a piece of his paddle. Local authorities were a problem, as well. Lewis logged “interesting experiences” with Alabama police and gun-wielding locals in the United States. He had to cycle through Tibet at night to avoid detection by Chinese roadblocks. And when he crossed into Egypt from Sudan, he was thrown in jail by the military on suspicion of being a spy. After his release from prison, he biked through the Sinai desert and across Jordan, Syria and Turkey. He then powered through Europe over the summer, arriving in Greenwich, in southeast London, to cheers from family, supporters and the Duke of Gloucester, the expedition’s British patron. Lewis broke the trip up into 16 legs and took breaks ranging from several weeks to several months in various parts of the world. He also picked up corporate sponsors for each leg of the trip, including sports clothing, gear and supplement companies; satellite phone and global positioning system firms; and M&M’s, which provided chocolate for the trip across the Pacific. Lewis said he hoped to use the expedition to raise funds for humanitarian causes and draw attention to environmental issues. He has already raised $66,000 for causes ranging from an orphanage in East Timor to kindergartens in Bangkok. “Instead of running away from England (as I think I was at the beginning) it is now more a question of riding forward on the back of ideas that I feel passionately about,” he wrote on his Web site in April.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

Read more →

10 months agoGuardiola: Man City a better team than last season

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Guardiola: Man City a better team than last seasonby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveManchester City boss Pep Guardiola is adamant they’re a better team than last season.Champions City are involved in a tight title race with Liverpool this season, but Guardiola thinks his side have improved from a year ago. “In little details we are better than last season, which is normal because we have more time together,” he told Sky Sports.Asked how City have improved, Guardiola added: “Our process, our build-ups, our high pressing we can use different movements, we have more alternatives to defend into attack and we are more solid when we defend deeper.”Guardiola also revealed what impressed him most about his side’s title-winning season.”It was our consistency,” he added. Of course we dropped points, that happens, but after that we were always there, which was the most remarkable thing and what I give the most importance.”Winning cups or the Champions League that’s six or seven games where you have to be good, but in the Premier League it can be every three days, which is why it’s the title I like the most.” last_img read more

Read more →

Lakers Remain Kobe Bryants Team – He Says So

At 37, Kobe Bryant remains resolute about his role with the Los Angeles Lakers. “It’s my team,” he said as he begins his 17th NBA season.In other words, the arrival of perennial all-stars Steve Nash and Dwight Howard changes nothing.“I got a question earlier about whose team this is,” Bryant told reporters at the Lakers media day Monday. “I don’t want to get into the, ‘Well, we share …’ No, it’s my team. But I want to make sure that Dwight, when I retire, this is going to be his. I want to teach him everything I possibly know so that when I step away this organization can ride on as if I never left.”That will be hard to do, but it’s a nice sentiment. The point is Bryant knows he he is nearing the end of his legendary career.As for Howard, who is less the serious person than Bryant, he said he is OK acquiescing and learning from Bryant.“I’m willing to go through that process, learn from one of the greatest to ever play the game and I think it will be great,” Howard said. “I think learning from a guy like Kobe, I know he’s going to be tough on me but I expect that and I want him to do that. So, I’ll take all the heat that he’s going to give me because I know at the end of the day that’s going to make me a better player and a better person and it’s going to make this team better.”According to Bryant, he wants to prepare Howard to become the face of the Lakers’ franchise — after Bryant walks away. He has two years left on his contract. Howard only has one year, but it is widely assumed that he will re-sign a max extension with the Lakers after the season.“This organization has done so much for me. I’m so thankful to them,” Bryant said. “That’s one of the conversations that (Lakers vice president of player personnel) Jimmy (Buss) and I had over the summer. It was like, ‘If you have the opportunity to get Dwight, get him because I want to see this organization continue to flourish and continue to be successful long after I’m gone.’ ”In the meantime, it’s Bryant’s team. He said so. read more

Read more →

David Robertss Overworked Bullpen Is A Bad Omen For The Dodgers

Of the five teams who leaned on their bullpen most in the series since 2000, three went on to lose, and the Dodgers’ fate is still undecided. Only the 2002 Anaheim Angels came back, and they faced an opponent (in the San Francisco Giants) who employed their relievers even more frequently.That’s not to say that reliever usage is a death sentence. Oftentimes, it simply reflects poor starting pitching: Each of the teams who used their starters less than the Dodgers saw them give up more than a dozen runs. This underscores how unusual Roberts’s reliever usage has been because his starters, comparatively, have been quite good. Aside from Darvish’s clunker last night, the Dodgers had two of the best starts for their length in World Series history, from Clayton Kershaw and Rich Hill. If Roberts had allowed them to go deeper into games when they were dealing, the bullpen might be fresh now.Roberts didn’t help matters when he used his bullpen aggressively Friday night, attempting to keep Houston within striking distance. In total, the Dodgers manager called on five different relievers to end the game, and only one — Kenta Maeda — went longer than 2 innings. Combined with the workload from the previous two games, key relievers have been pitching almost as much as the starters. So far, Maeda has pitched 4 innings this series, and Brandon Morrow, the crucial bridge to closer Kenley Jansen, has pitched 2 2/3 innings as well. Jansen himself has pitched 3 full innings.But as ESPN’s Sam Miller pointed out, if the Dodgers had managed to come back, Roberts’s tactics would have been hailed as strategically brilliant. Like many other postseason managerial moves, the aggressive reliever usage is easy to criticize in hindsight but much harder to argue with in the moment. It might have been a good bet that failed to pay out, but the strategy still leaves the Dodgers depleted of bullpen arms at the time when they need them most. In contrast, Houston manager A.J. Hinch relied on only two pitchers to carry the Astros to victory: starter Lance McCullers and starter-turned-reliever Brad Peacock. Despite running into some high-leverage jams, they managed to hold a powerful Dodgers lineup to only three runs. Like Roberts’ decision, keeping McCullers in the game in the third inning with the bases loaded was a gamble. But Hinch’s call managed to pay off when Dodgers shortstop Corey Seager hit into an uncharacteristic double play.The Astros’ win leaves them with a 67 percent chance of taking the World Series. That’s far higher than our opening prediction, but it comes almost entirely from the two victories they’ve edged out over the Dodgers. The remaining games are all coin-flip affairs, so the importance of that extra win in an evenly divided series can’t be overstated. That it came down to two managerial decisions that might have gone either way speaks to how balanced this matchup is. Had one or two pitches gone differently, the Dodgers might be in a commanding position right now, instead of fighting to tie the Series. LA is taxing its bullpenTeams with the fewest innings pitched by starters in the first three games of the World Series, 2000-17 Angels200212.713 Source: Baseball-Reference.com Rockies200711.314 TEAMYEARINNINGSRUNS ALLOWED Dodgers201712.76 Cardinals200411.315 Giants200211.016 A poor start from Yu Darvish hurt the Dodgers early on Friday, and they never mounted a comeback. With the Astros now riding a 2-1 lead and two games left in Houston, the Dodgers are in trouble. In addition to their deficit, a pattern of heavy reliever usage might leave them understaffed in the remaining World Series games.Darvish didn’t have his best stuff Friday night. Despite impressive fastball velocity, his slider was unusually flat. Houston pounced on the normally dominant ace in the second inning, gaining a four-run lead. From then on, the Dodgers attempted to build a handful of unsuccessful rallies but only managed to score three runs.Darvish’s bad outing adds to two other shorter-than-necessary starts for Los Angeles and might leave the bullpen tired in the next two pivotal games in Houston. Even if the relievers were fine Friday, the pattern of short starts is a poor omen for the Dodgers. read more

Read more →

Ohio State footballs Jake Stoneburner Jack Mewhort removed from scholarships

Ohio State redshirt senior tight end Jake Stoneburner and redshirt junior offensive lineman Jack Mewhort have been removed from their scholarships-at least until the end of the summer. In a statement released Friday night from Urban Meyer via an OSU department of athletics spokesperson, the two football players “will each be removed from athletic scholarship beginning with the summer term, and they will continue to be suspended from team activities until stipulations are successfully met.” “We are disappointed with the decisions made recently by two of our football players,” the release said, though, “(Stoneburner and Mewhort) will have an opportunity to return to the team in good standing following the summer session.” The decision comes nearly two weeks after Stoneburner and Mewhort were suspended June 3 after being arrested for obstructing justice. According to a police report from the Shawnee Hills Police Department, police said they spotted Stoneburner, Mewhort and a third person, Austin Barnard, urinating on what appeared to be an early childhood education school called The Oxford School near the Bogey Inn in Dublin, Ohio. After shining a bright light, police said the three suspects ran away. Police said they found Stoneburner and Barnard crouched between cars while Mewhort fled to a nearby wooded area before turning himself in after threatening to use a police dog. Stoneburner and Mewhort were expected to be starters under first-year football coach Urban Meyer. In 2011, Stoneburner caught 14 passes for 193 yards and had seven touchdown catches. Stoneburner was recruited out of Dublin Coffman High School. He has caught 37 passes so far in his career at OSU. Meyer listed Stoneburner after this year’s Spring Game on April 21 as one of his “top offensive playmakers.” Mewhort was a highly recruited prospect out of St. John’s Jesuit High School and Academy in Toledo, Ohio. read more

Read more →

Morris Publishing Eyes Debt Restructuring

first_imgThe company said the restructuring agreement is “subject to the final negotiation and execution of the definitive legal documentation and other closing conditions.” It was not immediately clear when those negotiations might take place.According to Michael Alcamo, president of a New York City-based investment banking firm M.C. Alcamo & Co., the restructuring agreement is a positive move for Morris as well as its lenders. “Banks are increasingly trying to avoid a Cygnus or a Young Broadcasting scenario,” he told FOLIO:. “They have realized two things: First, that bankruptcy is a very bad outcome for a media business; and secondly, that the prospects for recovery and growth in 2010 and 2011 are excellent.”In January, Morris said it hired investment bankers Lazard Freres & Co. as financial advisor and Neal, Gerber & Eisenberg as legal counsel as the publisher explored its “strategic options” concerning the company’s capital structure. The company was said also to be exploring a sale of its portfolio of nearly 20 city magazines, including Augusta, Athens, H magazine and Savannah. UPDATE: A spokesperson representing Morris said the company “was not and is not” exploring a sale of its magazines.Morris—an affiliate of the Morris Communications Company—also publishes 13 daily newspapers. Augusta, Georgia-based newspaper and city magazine publisher Morris Publishing Group said late Friday that it has agreed with the holders of more than 75 percent of its senior subordinated notes on a debt restructuring.According to terms of the agreement, holders of Morris’ $278.5 million in outstanding notes would exchange those existing notes for $100 million in new, second lien secured notes. At the same time, Morris “affiliates” would “make capital contributions and repay indebtedness to Morris Publishing in order to cancel $110 million of its $138.75 million in existing senior secured indebtedness,” the company said.It was not immediately clear who the affiliates are. Craig Mitchell, Morris’ senior vice president of finance, did not immediately return a request for comment.Morris also said it reached agreement with holders of more than 80 percent of its senior notes to again extend two semi-annual interest payments of $9.7 million on its senior subordinated notes until October 16. The payments originally were due February 1 and August 1.last_img read more

Read more →

BaTboT is up for imitating smart bat maneuvers

first_img © 2012 Phys.Org Explore further The interest in bats is because of the way bats change the shape of their wings, which has potential for improving the maneuverability of these air devices. Julian Colorado and colleagues at the Polytechnic University of Madrid, Spain and at Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island, built the drone with an end goal in mind—more agile, autonomous robots making more agile moves than can fixed wing aircraft. Colorado said that trying to mimic that level of functionality requires analysis of bat flight and novel technologies, ranging from design to control issues. Colorado’s team refers to their device officially as the “BaTboT” robot. They make use of shape memory alloys as muscle like actuators, behaving as biceps and triceps along the wing-skeleton structure of the robot. The wing extends and contracts under the control of the shape-memory alloy wires that switch between two shapes when different currents are applied. The wires, between the “shoulder” and “elbow” of the robot, rotate the elbow, pulling in the “fingers” to slim the wing profile on the upstroke. This contracts and extends the wings in a similar way to the biological counterpart, said Colorado. The device’s wingspan was inspired by a specific type of bat, the grey-headed flying fox, the largest bat in Australia. The US military partly funded this research. The paper presenting the design of this bat-like air vehicle is “Biomechanics of smart wings in a bat robot morphing wings using SMA actuators.” Authors are J Colorado, A Barrientos, C Rossi and K S Breuer. A professor of engineering, Breuer is from the School of Engineering at Brown and he has been studying bats for over ten years. “There is growing interest in the energy cost of flight,” according to Breuer. Understanding bat flight can help further the continued development in small, unmanned flying vehicles“Bats have evolved with truly extraordinary aerodynamic capabilities that enable them to fly in dense swarms, to avoid obstacles, and to fly with such agility that they can catch prey on the wing, maneuver through thick rainforests and make high speed 180 degree turns,” according to notes from Brown University’s notes on Bat Flight Research. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: BaTboT is up for imitating smart bat maneuvers (2012, June 3) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-06-batbot-imitating-smart-maneuvers.html More information: The design is said to be encouraging, as an example of how robot construction can move from rigid components toward bionic systems made from softer materials and artificial muscles. (Phys.org) — Robotics researchers in Spain and the U.S. are studying bats for their design work on drones. Bat wings are highly articulated, with skeletons similar to those of human arms and hands. The researchers have built a drone that mimics the way a bat changes its wing shape in flight. Bats achieve an “amazing” level of maneuverability, says a researcher, mainly because of their capacity of changing wing morphology during flight. Specifically, the “Batbot” replicates the way a bat changes the profile of its wing between the downstroke and upstroke. By folding wings toward their bodies on the upstroke, bats use 35 percent less energy and reduce aerodynamic drag, according to researchers at Brown. sites.google.com/a/brown.edu/f … /bat-flight-researchwww.disam.upm.es/~jdcolorado/BAT/BaTboT.html Bats save energy by drawing in wings on upstroke: studylast_img read more

Read more →

Tough markets have the average investor crying unc

first_imgTough markets have the average investor crying uncle, but now is not the time to lament losses—it’s time to bargain shop, suggests Marin Katusa, senior editor of Casey’s Energy Dividends. China is snatching up energy prospects around the world in anticipation of ever-tightening oil markets. Meanwhile, there is already money to be made in international markets where consumers are paying double the price for U.S. natural gas. In his interview with The Energy Report, Katusa says bold investors who target the right companies could “get a Rolex for the price of a Timex.” The Energy Report: Marin, in your recent 2013 Energy Forecast, you wrote that the earth is running out of accessible supplies of oil, uranium, coal, metals and virtually every other resource—with the emphasis on “accessible.” What does the loss of accessible energy resources mean for the margins of companies pulling the oil, gas and uranium out of the ground? Marin Katusa: Let’s start with oil and gas in North America. Unconventional production is becoming the new norm. This is a paradigm shift in domestic oil and gas production and a direct result of limited accessible resources and new technologies making once uneconomic resources economic. Another example I touch on in the special report is the move to deeper offshore wells. Look at the BP Plc (BP:NYSE; BP:LSE) 2010 oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. If it had extracted every drop of oil from the Macondo prospect, it would not have satisfied the world’s oil demand for one day. That gives you an insight into what the western world must do to satisfy its oil demand. Another example: Companies with warm in-situ recovery (WISR) production are making good margins in the U.S. Investors looking for exposure to U.S. uranium should look towards WISR uranium production, which has better margins than traditional ISR and conventional production in the rest of the U.S. This is another item that we mention in the 2013 Energy Forecast that has never been mentioned anywhere in the analyst community. Eventually, companies have to pass the price on to the consumer, which indicates higher energy costs for consumers. TER: Are consumers willing to pay for the cost of these unconventional methods, or do companies have to do more with less, thus leading to trouble with financing? MK: It doesn’t matter if you are Warren Buffett, Rick Rule or Doug Casey, the common trait of these three investing legends is investing in great people. Great people find great projects, and the smart money follows the smart people. Financing is a problem for most junior exploration and production (E&P) companies, as they rarely produce profits initially. The major producers, such as Exxon Mobil Corp. (XOM:NYSE), BP or Royal Dutch Shell Plc (RDS.A:NYSE; RDS.B:NYSE) can find financing. Then you have a large category in the middle that seeks offtake agreements, debt and equity financings. For example, companies in the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin are trying to attract capital by promising yield to their shareholders. Many of these small public producing companies produce less than 10,000 barrels of oil equivalent per day. The companies are paid a discount to the West Texas Intermediate (WTI) and to the Henry Hub, so there is very little room for error and the profit margins are very tight. But they are tapping into the greed factor in the current yield-chasing market. By paying a yield, these companies are attracting investors who normally do not understand or invest in the sector, nor do they understand the inherent risks associated with such companies. We advise investors to be very careful, as the margins are so tight that management has no room for error. Once something does go wrong, which it will, investors in many of these companies will experience a portfolio meltdown. We are much more excited about regions that are paying a premium to WTI and Henry Hub pricing, which we call energy-hungry regions. TER: Where are those energy-hungry regions? MK: Europe. In certain parts of Europe, consumers are paying the Middle East and Russia over twice the price of natural gas in North America. It’s the unconventional technologies that have lowered energy prices in North America, and these European regions have not experienced the energy renaissance yet, but they soon will. Some companies in Europe are making great margins at current prices. The Albanian government, for example, is signing offtake agreements with local producers at more than $8.50 per thousand cubic feet ($8.50/Mcf). The same gas is selling for $2.50/Mcf in Alberta. Investors who target the right companies could profit from higher oil and gas prices. The same situation is going on right now for oil in Germany, which has infrastructure, proven reserves and similar geology to Alberta, and yet the companies in Germany are making over 200% more for the same commodity as companies in North America, with similar production costs. The hottest area in the world right now for oil exploration is the East African Rift, where it costs north of $50–60 million ($50–60M) to drill an exploration well. Casey Energy Report was the first to recommend Africa Oil Corp. (AOI:TSX.V) and to do a fundamental research report on the potential of not just Africa Oil but the region in general. Developing these resources in East Africa is a multi-billion dollar proposition. China, which is expanding its own domestic production, is also investing billions into the region because China wants secure, long-term offtake arrangements to satisfy its growing oil demand. TER: Venezuela is using oil revenues to pay for social programs rather than investing in oil infrastructure. As a result, production is shrinking year-over-year. What will change with the death of Hugo Chavez? MK: Nothing will change in the near term. Venezuela subsidized social programs and local demand for oil and energy using the revenues it once made selling its oil to the U.S. Now, the government cannot take away those subsidies for social programs, and although it already has one of the lowest gasoline prices in the world, it cannot raise prices without risking civil unrest. The only way out is to charge higher prices for the oil it exports. Already, Americans pay almost 100% more for Venezuelan oil than for Canadian oil. Chavez’s last laugh is that Americans are paying twice the price to Venezuela than they are to their friendly neighbors to the north. That will not change in the near-term. For the next couple of years, the main agenda of politicians in Venezuela will be to keep the peace, to keep things moving along. Eventually they will have to attract foreign capital and expertise to expand the resource and produce more oil. Until that happens, nothing will change. What will change, on the American side, is more pipeline infrastructure development to increase access to less-expensive Canadian oil. That will happen with Keystone XL. Until then, Venezuela will remain the fourth-largest provider of oil to the U.S., and the U.S. will be paying a premium for Venezuelan oil. TER: In a recent Casey Daily Dispatch, you predicted the Keystone pipeline will be built, but that the U.S. government will impose a “maple leaf oil carbon levy,” creating a permanent differential for Canadian oil. What will that mean for companies working in the Canadian oil sands? MK: Until pipeline infrastructure is built out to the west so the Enbridge Energy Partners L.P. (EEP:NYSE) pipeline can make Canadian heavy oil accessible to Asia, Americans will always get Canadian oil at a differential to WTI. There will be a tax of some form on the “dirty” Canadian oil, which we’d like to remind Greenpeace is ethical oil, and of the highest global standards, unlike the bloody oil or unethical oil coming from some other parts of the world to the U.S. The Canadian oil sands are home to some of the largest projects in the world, run by some of the largest companies, using top technology regarding both environmental and safety standards. That said, President Obama will use this situation to satisfy the environmentalists who support him by bringing in some form of levy, which will satisfy NAFTA agreements. The end result will be a discount for the oil sands producers. That is the opportunity. Investors need to identify their favorite oil sand producer and be patient, as eventually this will change. Remember, even though the situation is hopeless, it’s not serious. In other words, there is a way we can profit from it. TER: When we interviewed Porter Stansberry, he was encouraging the idea of American energy independence. Do you think that could happen? MK: Porter is a good friend and a great speaker. Actually, if you ever get a chance to hang out with Porter, do. He is one of the most entertaining people I have ever met. He is smart, fun and fascinating. Porter and I have a bet going on right now. I took his money in a poker tournament with Doug, I beat him in golf and I will yet again take his money on this bet. Porter said oil would be below $40/bbl by the beginning of May 2013. I think that is complete nonsense. We bet 100 ounces of silver. He wins if oil is at or below $40/bbl, and I win if it never touches or goes below $40/bbl. I think it is in the best interest of the U.S. to become energy self-sufficient, but in the March Casey Energy Report, we identify all of the factual errors in the International Energy Agency report that states the U.S. will be on its way to becoming energy independent. The March issue of the Casey Energy Report is a must-read for anyone interested in investing in energy. TER: Which oil-and-gas companies could benefit from increase in the prices of oil and gas? MK: Our paid subscribers pay for that info, and I can’t give it away for free here, but I encourage all to take us up on our trial challenge. As I mentioned earlier, we were the first to discuss Africa Oil Corp. We recommended it at under $1 per share. We made a good gain on that one and it has gone even higher since then. I can’t emphasize enough how important people are when it comes to investing. With the right people, you will have the right share structure, the right cash in the bank, the right projects. If the management team is not significantly invested in its own company, you probably do not want to be invested in it either. In our reports, investors will learn more about the Casey 8 Ps in successful investing. TER: You said that you probably would not invest in companies that cannot make money at current fuel prices. How does this theory apply in this uranium space, where spot prices are around what you called a low of $40 per pound? MK: The uranium sector is the no-brainer of the energy sector right now. It’s the perfect contrarian bet. It is the most unloved sector of the energy world and conventional producers cannot make a profit at current prices. That is a fantastic situation for investors with a longer-term time horizon. In 1960, the U.S. led the world in uranium production at more than 36 million pounds (36 Mlb). In 2012, it produced just under 3.5 Mlb. There is an opportunity for the U.S. to increase its uranium production and become independent of Russian nuclear fuel. About one in every 10 houses in the U.S. is fueled by Russian uranium, an ironic result of the Cold War. You want to invest in companies that can make money using new technologies, such as WISR production. As the price of uranium moves higher, their margins increase significantly. One company that has been in our ten-bagger club is Uranium Energy Corp. (UEC:NYSE.MKT). The company is run by smart people, who have actually done what they said they would. CEO Amir Adnani has put together a great team of people, such as Harry Anthony, who knows ISR production. This U.S.-listed company is a low-cost producer, and makes money at current market prices. As for explorers, we had a great win with Fission Energy Corp. (FIS:TSX.V; FSSIF:OTCQX). It has the right management team that made not one, but two major discoveries. That doesn’t happen by luck; that happens by the right people doing the right exploration, and investors have had +100% gains with Fission. If you want to invest in high-risk juniors, the Athabasca Basin is the king of all uranium basins. It has the highest-grade uranium in the world, but drilling there is very expensive, so make sure you invest in management teams that know what they’re doing. Remember, it’s all about the people. TER: Do you have any parting thoughts for our readers? MK: If you have a longer time horizon, fortune will favor the bold. This is a fantastic market, offering opportunities to make a lot of money in the sector. It’s obvious the junior resource sector is in the doldrums, but this current bear market is providing great deals. Everyone wants to buy a Rolex for the price of a Timex. Right now, Mr. Market has put up everything on sale. But testicular fortitude is required in these markets, and if you invest in the right people, fortune will favor the bold. TER: Marin, thank you for your time and your insights. Investment Analyst Marin Katusa is the senior editor of Casey’s Energy Report, Casey’s Energy Dividends and Casey’s Energy Confidential. With a background in mathematics, Katusa left teaching post-secondary mathematics to pursue portfolio management within the resource sector. He is regularly interviewed on national and local television channels in North America such as the Business News Network (BNN) and many other radio and newspapers for his opinions and insights regarding the resource sector. A regular part of his due diligence process for Casey Research includes property tours, which has resulted in him visiting hundreds of mining and energy exploration projects all around the world. For more cutting-edge investment ideas from Marin Katusa’s, get your very own 2013 Energy Forecast.last_img read more

Read more →

Former North Dakota lawmaker Rae Ann Kelsch died l

first_imgFormer North Dakota lawmaker Rae Ann Kelsch died last month at age 58 after eating raw oysters at a New Orleans restaurant. The alleged culprit: a fast-moving bacterial infection — linked to consuming raw or undercooked shellfish — that caused her organs to shut down.The place where Kelsch ate oysters has not been publicly released.Oysters have long been a trademark of southern cuisine, but they also pose health risks for some.”There’s always going to be a small amount of risk,” says Dr. Fred Lopez, who studies infectious disease at Louisiana State University’s Health Sciences Center.Lopez says the biggest danger comes from a pervasive bacteria called Vibrio vulnificus, which is what reportedly killed Kelsch.Vibrio vulnificus naturally thrives in brackish waters where the temperature is above 68 degrees Fahrenheit. As a result, it’s actually more common in the Gulf of Mexico, where the waters are warmer, than on the East and West coasts.”If you’re consuming a raw oyster that comes from the Gulf Coast waters … particularly in the summer months,” says Lopez, “You have to assume that it has Vibrio vulnificus.”Thomas “Uptown T” Stewart is the famous oyster shucker at the New Orleans restaurant Pascal’s Manale. Stewart has worked at the restaurant for more than 30 years, and he knows his clients well. It seems like he’s always shouting “What’s happening, y’all?” to people walking through the front door.Stewart’s side of the bar is covered by a pile of raw oysters and ice. One by one he digs them out, pries open the shells with a knife and frees the meat with effortless speed.Brent and Paula Coussou are on the other side of the bar. They’re each nursing a beer, and there’s a row of empty oysters between them. They say they’ve been coming to the restaurant for as long as Stewart has been working there.”This guy here’s the best. The best,” says Brent Coussou.” I mean, I’ve been to a lot of places and it’s just, his oysters are very clean. He doesn’t have any chiplies in his oysters.”That may not be an official term, but he’s referring to those crunchy bits of shell that sometimes get slurped down with the raw oyster.Coussou heard the news about the politician who died, but he’s not worried. He says he’s never gotten sick.Although many oysters are exposed to Vibrio vulnificus, they aren’t dangerous to everyone. People with specific pre-existing health problems are most vulnerable.That list includes liver disease, diabetes, kidney disease, alcoholism and cancer. Generally speaking, people with weakened immune systems are the most at risk. Lopez says those people shouldn’t eat raw oysters — period.”They can eat shellfish,” he says. “They just need to make sure that they’re thoroughly cooked — boiled, fried, steamed, etc.”Proper cooking kills the bacteria completely. All things considered, Vibrio vulnificus infections are still very rare.But when people with weakened immune systems are infected by Vibrio vulnificus, anywhere from one-third to one-half of those people die.”That’s a very high mortality rate,” says Lopez.That’s why there are very strict regulations around oyster harvesting. The Interstate Shellfish Sanitation Conference (ISSC) sets those regulations for the Food and Drug Administration.”Probably, shellfish and milk are the two most regulated foods in the country,” says Ken Moore, Executive Director of the ISSC.There’s an old adage, that you should only eat raw oysters in months with an “R.” September through April — basically the cooler months. So this isn’t a new idea.Moore says regulations have tightened over the last 10 years or so. For example, during the warm summer months, oysters that are meant to be eaten raw must be refrigerated within an hour of harvesting. He says it’s had a positive effect.”We’ve actually seen a reduction in [raw oyster Vibrio vulnificus] cases,” Moore says. “We think that the controls that we have in place are actually keeping those numbers low.”Dr. Alex Billioux agrees. He’s the assistant secretary for Louisiana’s Office of Public Health.”It is very, very rare to become ill from eating oysters,” says Billioux.And though infections from raw oysters are down, Billioux says the amount of Vibrio vulnificus in the water is actually increasing due to warming waters. “I definitely expect our jobs to become harder as the waters continue to warm because of climate change,” he says.That could mean more testing, scrutiny, and risk in the future.”I think that’s sort of the big point when we start talking about the climate change effects,” Billioux says. “It really can touch everything.”This story comes to us from member station WWNO in New Orleans. Support for the Coastal Desk comes from the Walton Family Foundation, the Greater New Orleans Foundation, the Foundation for Louisiana and local listeners. You can listen to the audio here. Copyright 2018 WWNO – New Orleans Public Radio. To see more, visit WWNO – New Orleans Public Radio.last_img read more

Read more →

The disabled peer chosen to be the equality watchd

first_imgThe disabled peer chosen to be the equality watchdog’s new disability commissioner has still not attended a single board meeting, more than three months after his appointment, because of a continuing stand-off over the decision to scrap the post.Lord [Kevin] Shinkwin (pictured) is boycotting board meetings until the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) reinstates the role of disability commissioner, and allows him to chair the new disability advisory committee (DAC).He responded last year to an advert for the post of disability commissioner but was then told – just 36 hours before his first board meeting – that the role had been made redundant and that he would simply be a commissioner and would not lead on disability issues.The Conservative peer confirmed to Disability News Service (DNS) this week that he is continuing to boycott board meetings until what he believes is a vital post is reinstated, and he is allowed to chair the DAC.He said: “I would be delighted to attend board meetings when the disability commissioner post is reinstated and when I am allowed to chair the disability advisory committee. That hasn’t happened yet.“My understanding from what I have been told is that I have to accept the abolition of the disability commissioner post and that I will not be chairing the disability advisory committee. I cannot accept either of those.“I think it is absolutely essential that disabled people have a very strong voice as disabled people.“We have equality needs the other protected characteristic groups do not have, and they need to be championed.”He made it clear that when he applied for the post, he was applying for the role of disability commissioner, which is confirmed by a letter – seen by DNS – that was sent to the peer last November by the Government Equalities Office.Asked if he had consulted lawyers about his stand-off with EHRC, he said: “I am keeping my own counsel. I am finding it hard to believe, to be honest, that I am in this situation.“It is not just me who is in this situation, it is disabled people who are in this situation.“Just by abolishing a disability commissioner, an equality body cannot abolish the need for a disability commissioner, and that need continues and indeed it is growing.”The peer said that critics would be “really quite surprised” by his willingness to speak out against the government if needed.He said: “I think it is too easy for someone to say, ‘Oh, he’s a Tory, he’s not one of us.’“If I chaired the DAC I would be listening hard, I wouldn’t go in and impose my views.”Although he has generally been loyal to his party since he was appointed to the Lords in 2015, he points out that he has voted against the government.Last December, he voted against the government when the crossbench peer Baroness Deech – backed by EHRC – tried unsuccessfully to introduce measures that would have forced licensed premises to obey laws on accessibility when renewing their alcohol licences.He said: “If people were to say to me, ‘Are you prepared to actually take a stand? Yes, I am, on issues that I really believe in.”Asked if that meant opposing the government, he said: “If necessary.”Asked for a response to Lord Shinkwin’s latest comments, an EHRC spokeswoman said: “The chair and the rest of the board continue to hope that matters can be resolved so that we can focus our attention on tackling the serious inequalities experienced by disabled people in Britain.“The appointment of the new disability advisory committee continues. The arrangements for chairing the committee have not yet been finalised.”EHRC has previously said that, under its new approach, “rather than having just one named champion of disability rights on the board, all board members, including a number of disabled commissioners and others with direct experience, will have a responsibility to champion disability issues”.While he waits for a resolution, Lord Shinkwin said he would “continue campaigning on disability equality”, including on the need for the government to “make good on the commitments” it made in its original Disability Discrimination Act in 1995, including the duty to make reasonable adjustments.This also includes campaigning on his abortion (disability equality) bill (see separate story), which would make it illegal to abort a foetus with a significant impairment after 24 weeks of a pregnancy, just as it is with foetuses without impairments.At present, it is legal under the 1967 Abortion Act to abort a foetus right up to the point of birth, where [in the act’s words] “there is a substantial risk that if the child were born it would suffer from such physical or mental abnormalities as to be seriously handicapped”.last_img read more

Read more →