Lakers Remain Kobe Bryants Team – He Says So

At 37, Kobe Bryant remains resolute about his role with the Los Angeles Lakers. “It’s my team,” he said as he begins his 17th NBA season.In other words, the arrival of perennial all-stars Steve Nash and Dwight Howard changes nothing.“I got a question earlier about whose team this is,” Bryant told reporters at the Lakers media day Monday. “I don’t want to get into the, ‘Well, we share …’ No, it’s my team. But I want to make sure that Dwight, when I retire, this is going to be his. I want to teach him everything I possibly know so that when I step away this organization can ride on as if I never left.”That will be hard to do, but it’s a nice sentiment. The point is Bryant knows he he is nearing the end of his legendary career.As for Howard, who is less the serious person than Bryant, he said he is OK acquiescing and learning from Bryant.“I’m willing to go through that process, learn from one of the greatest to ever play the game and I think it will be great,” Howard said. “I think learning from a guy like Kobe, I know he’s going to be tough on me but I expect that and I want him to do that. So, I’ll take all the heat that he’s going to give me because I know at the end of the day that’s going to make me a better player and a better person and it’s going to make this team better.”According to Bryant, he wants to prepare Howard to become the face of the Lakers’ franchise — after Bryant walks away. He has two years left on his contract. Howard only has one year, but it is widely assumed that he will re-sign a max extension with the Lakers after the season.“This organization has done so much for me. I’m so thankful to them,” Bryant said. “That’s one of the conversations that (Lakers vice president of player personnel) Jimmy (Buss) and I had over the summer. It was like, ‘If you have the opportunity to get Dwight, get him because I want to see this organization continue to flourish and continue to be successful long after I’m gone.’ ”In the meantime, it’s Bryant’s team. He said so. read more

Read more →

Denver Broncos Linebacker Von Miller Arrested

Denver Broncos’ Von Miller just can’t stay out of trouble.The linebacker, who is scheduled to appeal his four-game suspension for violating the NFL drug policy, was arrested Sunday for failure to appear in court. Miller posted a $1,000 bond and was released after he failed to appear in an Arapahoe County court for a traffic citation, Sheriff Dave Walcher told USA Today Sports.Miller was cited in October for driving without a license, having no proof of insurance, and careless driving. An arrest warrant was issued in January when the 24-year-old failed to appear for that court date.The team issued a statement Wednesday indicating they were aware of Miller’s latest incident.“We have been aware of the matter involving Von Miller’s failure to appear in court for traffic violations,” the Broncos said in a statement. “It was reported to the league earlier this week and is being handled through the legal system.”The Broncos had a day off from training camp Sunday so Miller’s arrest had no effect on the team’s practice. read more

Read more →

Welcome To The 2018 World Series Where Even SalevsKershaw Turns Into A

BOSTON — Tuesday night was billed as one of the greatest pitching matchups in World Series history: Clayton Kershaw versus Chris Sale — two of the elite starters of their generation. On a cool night in Boston, a sold-out Fenway Park was well-aware of the pedigree of its foe and greeted the Los Angeles Dodgers ace with chants of “Ker-Shaaawww, Ker-Shaaawww,” drawing out the last syllable of his surname as he pitched. But the lyrical taunting was short-lived as Kershaw didn’t make it far into Game 1 — and neither did Sale, for that matter.We didn’t get a classic pitching duel. Instead, we received a heavy dose of 2018 baseball. And that style of play — namely bullpenning — favored the Red Sox en route to an 8-4, series-opening victory.Six Red Sox relievers combined to allow just one run over five innings, and Boston pinch-hitter Eduardo Nunez broke the game open with a three-run homer off Dodger reliever Alex Wood in the seventh inning.That both of the starting pitchers lasted only four innings is telling of how quickly the game is changing. Tuesday marked just the fourth Game 1 — the game that often features a pair of aces — in World Series history in which neither starting pitcher recorded an out in the fifth inning. In the three previous occasions — in 1923, 1966 and 2004 — all but one of the starters allowed as many or more runs as Sale or Kershaw did in fewer innings prior to departing.1And that other starter — Baltimore’s Dave McNally in 1966 — had walked the bases loaded in the third inning before getting the hook. In other words, those starters had been battered. That wasn’t the case Tuesday. Instead, Dodgers manager Dave Roberts and Red Sox manager Alex Cora had their aces on short leashes.Teams have become aware of how performance typically declines the deeper a starter pitches into a game, and teams are also eager to try to gain righty/lefty platoon advantages when they can find them in the later innings. Teams also monitor fatigue, and Sale was somewhat taxed in throwing 91 pitches.During the 232-minute game Tuesday, the two clubs combined to use 12 pitchers, who threw a total of 308 pitches. Through Tuesday, relievers have accounted for 50.5 percent of innings this postseason, which would be a record. That mark is up 4 percentage points from last postseason (46.5 percent) and significantly from the 2010 playoffs (32.3 percent). While bullpens have taken on more and more work in the regular season, their usage and importance in the postseason is reaching unprecedented levels.Dodger infielder Brian Dozier said “anything goes” in the World Series. But the urgent, anything-goes practices employed Tuesday were carryovers from the regular season. In fact, the Dodgers have already faced the most extreme form of pitching game strategy this postseason.While some traditionalists have bemoaned the move toward bullpens, Red Sox reliever and Game 1 winner Matt Barnes told FiveThirtyEight in a cramped postgame clubhouse that he is all for this style of play.“I’m about whatever it takes to get wins in the World Series,” Barnes said. “How you do it? It doesn’t matter to me. You just have to win 11 games before anyone else does.”Cora began the Red Sox parade of relievers in the top of the fifth when he summoned Barnes out of the right-field bullpen to replace Sale, who had walked the lead-off batter, Dozier. Barnes, who has become a trusted setup man, allowed a single to Justin Turner, and Dozier later scored on a Manny Machado groundout to tie the score at 3.Kershaw entered the game with questions about his postseason performances and left with a career ERA of 4.28 in 145 postseason innings. He also continues to suffer from declining fastball velocity, as the pitch sat between 90 and 91 mph Tuesday. He relied heavily on his breaking pitches. Only CC Sabathia owns a worse ERA among pitchers who have made at least 15 postseason starts. While Kershaw was hit hard at times on Tuesday — including a 105.9 mph single and a 109.1 mph double off the bat of J.D. Martinez — he wasn’t helped by his surrounding cast, either. L.A.’s starting first baseman, David Freese, failed to catch a foul pop-up in the first inning. It wasn’t ruled an error but was a play that could have been made — and it might have cost the Dodgers two runs.Kershaw allowed three runs through four innings. After walking Mookie Betts and allowing a single to Andrew Benintendi to begin the fifth, he was was pulled from the game. Roberts called on Ryan Madson, who allowed both inherited runners to score to give the Red Sox a 5-3 lead.More innings pitched by relievers requires lineups to remain flexible as offenses try to counter the platoon advantage gained by switching the handedness of pitchers. For instance, the Brewers had left-handed starter Wade Miley throw just five pitches in a start in Game 5 of the National League Championship Series before going to a right-handed-heavy cast of relievers against the platoon-heavy Dodgers. And on Tuesday, five of the six relievers that followed the lefty Sale were right-handed.In response to pitching strategies, Dozier joked Monday that the Dodgers have begun to pull hockey-style line changes in games. Los Angeles was the first club in World Series history to start nine right-handed batters with no switch-hitters. But by the seventh inning Tuesday, three L.A. lefties and a switch-hitter had joined the game, and only three Dodgers were playing positions they had occupied on the starting lineup card: Turner (third base), Machado (shortstop) and Yasiel Puig (right field).While the two managers traded chess pieces, it was Cora who seemed to win the most strategic battles, as he has done all October. He struck a decisive blow on Tuesday by pinch-hitting Nunez for left-handed hitter Rafael Devers when Roberts called the left-handed Wood into the game in the seventh.“Cora is prepared,” Barnes said. “Tonight is another example, pinch-hitting (Nunez). It’s a lot of fun playing for him. He knows exactly what he’s doing.”The Red Sox have won 116 games under Cora this season, a year in which the game seems to be changing so quickly. They are now three wins from a fourth championship this century.Check out our latest MLB predictions. read more

Read more →

David Robertss Overworked Bullpen Is A Bad Omen For The Dodgers

Of the five teams who leaned on their bullpen most in the series since 2000, three went on to lose, and the Dodgers’ fate is still undecided. Only the 2002 Anaheim Angels came back, and they faced an opponent (in the San Francisco Giants) who employed their relievers even more frequently.That’s not to say that reliever usage is a death sentence. Oftentimes, it simply reflects poor starting pitching: Each of the teams who used their starters less than the Dodgers saw them give up more than a dozen runs. This underscores how unusual Roberts’s reliever usage has been because his starters, comparatively, have been quite good. Aside from Darvish’s clunker last night, the Dodgers had two of the best starts for their length in World Series history, from Clayton Kershaw and Rich Hill. If Roberts had allowed them to go deeper into games when they were dealing, the bullpen might be fresh now.Roberts didn’t help matters when he used his bullpen aggressively Friday night, attempting to keep Houston within striking distance. In total, the Dodgers manager called on five different relievers to end the game, and only one — Kenta Maeda — went longer than 2 innings. Combined with the workload from the previous two games, key relievers have been pitching almost as much as the starters. So far, Maeda has pitched 4 innings this series, and Brandon Morrow, the crucial bridge to closer Kenley Jansen, has pitched 2 2/3 innings as well. Jansen himself has pitched 3 full innings.But as ESPN’s Sam Miller pointed out, if the Dodgers had managed to come back, Roberts’s tactics would have been hailed as strategically brilliant. Like many other postseason managerial moves, the aggressive reliever usage is easy to criticize in hindsight but much harder to argue with in the moment. It might have been a good bet that failed to pay out, but the strategy still leaves the Dodgers depleted of bullpen arms at the time when they need them most. In contrast, Houston manager A.J. Hinch relied on only two pitchers to carry the Astros to victory: starter Lance McCullers and starter-turned-reliever Brad Peacock. Despite running into some high-leverage jams, they managed to hold a powerful Dodgers lineup to only three runs. Like Roberts’ decision, keeping McCullers in the game in the third inning with the bases loaded was a gamble. But Hinch’s call managed to pay off when Dodgers shortstop Corey Seager hit into an uncharacteristic double play.The Astros’ win leaves them with a 67 percent chance of taking the World Series. That’s far higher than our opening prediction, but it comes almost entirely from the two victories they’ve edged out over the Dodgers. The remaining games are all coin-flip affairs, so the importance of that extra win in an evenly divided series can’t be overstated. That it came down to two managerial decisions that might have gone either way speaks to how balanced this matchup is. Had one or two pitches gone differently, the Dodgers might be in a commanding position right now, instead of fighting to tie the Series. LA is taxing its bullpenTeams with the fewest innings pitched by starters in the first three games of the World Series, 2000-17 Angels200212.713 Source: Baseball-Reference.com Rockies200711.314 TEAMYEARINNINGSRUNS ALLOWED Dodgers201712.76 Cardinals200411.315 Giants200211.016 A poor start from Yu Darvish hurt the Dodgers early on Friday, and they never mounted a comeback. With the Astros now riding a 2-1 lead and two games left in Houston, the Dodgers are in trouble. In addition to their deficit, a pattern of heavy reliever usage might leave them understaffed in the remaining World Series games.Darvish didn’t have his best stuff Friday night. Despite impressive fastball velocity, his slider was unusually flat. Houston pounced on the normally dominant ace in the second inning, gaining a four-run lead. From then on, the Dodgers attempted to build a handful of unsuccessful rallies but only managed to score three runs.Darvish’s bad outing adds to two other shorter-than-necessary starts for Los Angeles and might leave the bullpen tired in the next two pivotal games in Houston. Even if the relievers were fine Friday, the pattern of short starts is a poor omen for the Dodgers. read more

Read more →

Ohio State mens hockey prepares for homeandhome with Robert Morris

OSU then-sophomore forward Matthew Weis (16) tries to corral the puck during a face-off in a game against Michigan on Jan. 15. OSU won in a shootout. Credit: Kevin Stankiewicz | Oller ReporterThe Ohio State men’s hockey team started the 2016-17 season with a bang, taking down then-No. 3 Denver on the road. Since then, the Buckeyes have continued to improve and are soaring up USCHO college hockey rankings heading into its two-game set against Robert Morris, starting Friday.No. 11 OSU took care of business last weekend with a sweep over Niagara University, scoring a combined 16 goals in two games. The two wins brought OSU’s record to 5-0-2, the first time the program has been undefeated through its first seven games since 1983-84. Junior forward Matthew Weis tallied six points in those two games against Niagara — two goals and four assists. Senior forward Nick Schilkey earned his first career hat trick as a Buckeye, and sophomore defenseman Tommy Parran had three points on the night, including two goals. Weis and Parran were named the conference’s first and third stars of the week, respectively.“It’s a great accomplishment,” Weis said. “My linemates played very well alongside me, so it’s a team award.”OSU has one of the most potent offenses in the NCAA. The Buckeyes lead the country with 99 points and rank third nationally with 4.86 goals per game. OSU has scored five goals in each of its last four games, one big reason being freshman forward Tanner Laczynski.The 6-foot-1, 191-pound winger has assimilated into college hockey with ease. He leads the team in points (11) and assists (8), making his line one of the most productive on the team. Laczynski has also garnered attention on the powerplay unit, scoring twice in the first seven games. He said that while the points are appealing on the stat sheet, it’s more about the team result for him.“Teams are not going to take us lighter anymore. I think that’s a good thing,” he said. “We’re going to start to get people’s best games, and that’s just going to make us better as a team and better for the future.”The Robert Morris Colonials are coming off of a split against Army, where Colonials freshman goaltender Francis Marotte made 26 saves on 27 shots, placing him in the top 10 in the country in save percentage at .946. Marotte is 2-1-1 in the net for coach Derek Schooley, but the Colonials are 0-2-0 without Marotte.In its own net, OSU senior goalkeeper Matt Tomkins has been unbeatable this season. He has kept OSU in several games, including an overtime tie at Miami. For the year, Tomkins has a .928 save percentage and is 4-0-2 between the pipes. For OSU to get past Marotte and provide support for Tomkins, special teams will play a large factor in the two-game set. Robert Morris ranks second to last in the NCAA in penalty kill, which serves as the perfect opportunity for OSU to assert its dominance on the powerplay, which is 8-for-26 through seven games.“We work on powerplay every week and (OSU coach Steve Rohlik) has been drilling into us that we’re not just given a spot,” Laczynski said. “You really have to work for it and it shouldn’t take him jumping on us in practice to realize that.”Robert Morris junior forward Brady Ferguson and sophomore defenseman Eric Israel lead the offensive attack of the Colonials. Ferguson leads the team with 10 points and Israel has already chalked up seven assists. The penalty kill of OSU is struggling at a rate of 78.9 percent. Coach Rohlik said that the team still has plenty of room to improve from its fast start, mostly on the defensive side of the puck.“When you start scoring a few goals, it starts affecting your overall game and you start cheating the game,” he said. “And I thought we did that this past weekend. You still got to play the right way.”OSU begins its two-game home-and-home on home ice at the Schottenstein Center. The puck will drop around 7 p.m. for the Buckeyes’ second home game of the year.The Ohio State Marching Band will perform Script Ohio on Ice during an intermission on Friday. read more

Read more →

Softball sweeps away state competition

On the same day the NFL promoted breast cancer awareness, college teams from Ohio finished a softball tournament with the same purpose.The 19-team tournament at Fred Beekman Park ended with only two undefeated teams. The Buckeyes were one of them. The softball team won its first three games in dominating fashion: 11-1 against Dayton, 7-1 against Ohio and 10-1 against Kent State. Victories over Dayton and Kent State were ended by the mercy rule at the end of the fifth inning.OSU’s defense won its fourth game 5-2 against Bowling Green, and allowed just two runs from a home run in the third inning. The offense did not get started until the bottom of the fourth when freshman Julia Peccina hit a triple down the left field line to score freshman Brittany Mills. Peccina then scored a run on a single by senior Rebecca Schultz. One more run was added later in the fourth on a single by sophomore Katie Simonton to cap the three run inning. The Buckeyes took the lead back for good, and went on to win 5-2.“We’re pleased with the weekend … after only two weeks of practice,” said coach Linda Kalafatis. “We looked more comfortable and showed maturity. We took a great step in the right direction. This tournament gives us game experience to grow as a team.”Offensive numbers for the Buckeyes were impressive throughout the tournament. The team had a collective batting average of .390 with 13 extra base hits including six home runs. Senior Sam Marder led the team offensively with a .450 batting average, nine RBI and two home runs. The pitching staff had a 1.88 ERA while allowing only 20 hits. Senior Megan Miller and freshman Melanie Nichols carried the brunt of the load for the Buckeyes on the mound, combining for 19 strikeouts and walking only three batters.“Fall is all about getting freshmen ready and comfortable,” Kalafatis said.Freshman contribution was not only present on the mound with Melanie Nichols, but at the plate and on the field with Peccina and Megan Coletta. Peccina appeared in three games, starting two of them, and went 4-8 with two runs scored and three RBI. Coletta had a big weekend, going 4-10, including a home run and a double, with five RBI, She started all four games. Coletta also made a spectacular double play as the third baseman in the bottom of the fifth inning against Ohio. She dove to catch a low line drive down the third base line then threw to first base to double off the runner heading to second base.“The freshmen will contribute this season,” Kalafatis said.The money raised from the volunteer-run tournament benefits the Stefanie Spielman Fund for Breast Cancer Research at the Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute.Chris Spielman spoke at this year’s Ohio Collegiate Charity Classic to inform the participating women about the tournament, the Stefanie Spielman Fund and the precautions needed to deal with breast cancer, urging them all to be educated and know about their body. “While you’re playing softball, you might be savings someone’s life. … I promise you will make a difference,” Spielman said to the players. “What you give will grow, what you keep you lose.”Kalafatis was grateful for the overwhelming support from the crowd. “We had a good crowd and we are thankful for their support of this important event,” she said. read more

Read more →

Tressel stirs together perfect bowl game mix

With a dash of Tresselball and a pinch of risky business, the Buckeyes finally found their recipe for bowl game success. All it took was a strong defense that has been around all season and a timely fourth-and-one conversion for the Buckeyes to step out ahead of the Oregon Ducks 26-17 in the 2010 Rose Bowl.Ohio State owns third downThe Buckeye defense held the Ducks to only two third down conversions in 11 attempts. They allowed Oregon just 12 first downs throughout the game. Junior Cameron Heyward said that all it took for the OSU defense to hold up Oregon was “Discipline. They are a great, high-powered offense but we knew we could hang with them,” he said.On the other side of the ball, quarterback Terrelle Pryor and the Buckeye offense dominated on third down conversions. They were successful for 11 of 21 attempts, and totaled 26 first downs, more than double that of Oregon. “It was pretty tough because every time we’d get late in the game, they’d get a third down [conversion]. It was frustrating,” said Kenny Rowe, Oregon linebacker and Defensive MVP of the Rose Bowl. “We’ve just got to get them off the field on third downs.”Ohio State ran 89 plays throughout the course of the game, the third-most in Rose Bowl Game history. Oregon ran 53 plays, the eighth-fewest number of plays in Rose Bowl Game history. The difference, 36 plays, is the second-most in the history of the game.Time of possession weighs on Ohio State’s sideAll year long, the Ohio State defense has spent most of the time on the field. “The offense did a great job to help out the defense. [The defense] has been carrying a lot this year,” Pryor said. “We’re just glad that we got out there and tried to help them out as much as we could.”And help they did, by holding the ball for more than 41 minutes, while asking the defense to cover quarterback Jeremiah Masoli and his squad for only 18 minutes, allowing them to rest in between bouts with the quick and up-tempo Oregon offense.When asked how they were able to stand up to that offense, coach Jim Tressel simply said, “We have an up-tempo defense.”Buckeyes slow down Oregon’s playmakersAll talk leading up to Friday’s game centered around the speed and unpredictable nature of Masoli and Oregon’s running backs. However, the Buckeyes were able to limit Masoli to only six carries for nine total yards, his lowest total all season.“I thought our [defensive] guys prepared extremely well,” Tressel said. “And we were going to make sure that [Masoli] wasn’t running scot-free.”Redshirt freshman LaMichael James led the Ducks in rushing with 70 yards on 15 carries, but fell far short of his average of 123 yards per game. Similarly, LeGarrette Blount, the highly touted back who was suspended for most of the season, was held to 36 yards on five attempts.Blount also fumbled at the 18-yard line late in the third quarter, which ended Oregon’s last drive deep into the red zone.Buckeyes succeed on fourth down attemptWith two minutes left on the clock in the first half, Ohio State was stuck on fourth-down with one yard to go and the score tied 10-10. Knowing that Oregon would receive the ball to start the second half, Tressel knew he had to try and score before halftime, he said. “[Oregon coach] Chip [Kelly] was calling timeouts before the half while we had the ball because he wanted it with a minute to go to try to get points for them,” Tressel said. “It was that kind of game that you knew every possession, every opportunity was going to be key.”The Buckeyes took the opportunity to convert on fourth-and-one and Brandon Saine succeeded in pushing the ball four yards to the Oregon 10-yard line to set up OSU for a field goal to give OSU the lead heading into the half. read more

Read more →

Ohio State footballs Jake Stoneburner Jack Mewhort removed from scholarships

Ohio State redshirt senior tight end Jake Stoneburner and redshirt junior offensive lineman Jack Mewhort have been removed from their scholarships-at least until the end of the summer. In a statement released Friday night from Urban Meyer via an OSU department of athletics spokesperson, the two football players “will each be removed from athletic scholarship beginning with the summer term, and they will continue to be suspended from team activities until stipulations are successfully met.” “We are disappointed with the decisions made recently by two of our football players,” the release said, though, “(Stoneburner and Mewhort) will have an opportunity to return to the team in good standing following the summer session.” The decision comes nearly two weeks after Stoneburner and Mewhort were suspended June 3 after being arrested for obstructing justice. According to a police report from the Shawnee Hills Police Department, police said they spotted Stoneburner, Mewhort and a third person, Austin Barnard, urinating on what appeared to be an early childhood education school called The Oxford School near the Bogey Inn in Dublin, Ohio. After shining a bright light, police said the three suspects ran away. Police said they found Stoneburner and Barnard crouched between cars while Mewhort fled to a nearby wooded area before turning himself in after threatening to use a police dog. Stoneburner and Mewhort were expected to be starters under first-year football coach Urban Meyer. In 2011, Stoneburner caught 14 passes for 193 yards and had seven touchdown catches. Stoneburner was recruited out of Dublin Coffman High School. He has caught 37 passes so far in his career at OSU. Meyer listed Stoneburner after this year’s Spring Game on April 21 as one of his “top offensive playmakers.” Mewhort was a highly recruited prospect out of St. John’s Jesuit High School and Academy in Toledo, Ohio. read more

Read more →

Wrestling No 2 Ohio State returns home for matchup against No 14

Ohio State redshirt senior wrestler Bo Jordan battles Arizona State sophomore Zahid Valencia during a dual meet on Nov. 12. The Buckeyes won 31-12, but Jordan lost the match. Credit: Colin Hass-Hill | Sports EditorComing off victories against Maryland and Rutgers, No. 2 Ohio State (8-0, 3-0 Big Ten) faces off against No. 14 Minnesota (4-0, 1-0 Big Ten) at 7 p.m. Friday at the Schottenstein Center.Minnesota defeated Michigan State Sunday, and has seven wrestlers on InterMat’s top 20 individual class rankings. One potential matchup that would highlight the night involves No. 4 Ethan Lizak of Minnesota, who will likely wrestle against Ohio State’s No. 1 Nathan Tomasello at 125 pounds.  “That’s probably the premier matchup of the night,” Ohio State head coach Tom Ryan said.Tomasello made his season debut against Maryland, winning 18-2 by technical fall, but sat out the Buckeyes’ next meet against Rutgers. He missed the first couple months of the season with a right knee injury.Ohio State junior Te’Shan Campbell and Minnesota senior Nick Wanzek will square off at 165 pounds. They come in ranked 13th and 9th, respectively. Campbell lost to Rutgers’ No. 12 Richie Lewis by decision 5-2 in his last matchup.Redshirt sophomore Ke-Shawn Hayes also lost by decision against Rutgers, when No. 12 Eleazar DeLuca got the best of him in a 12-7 decision. Hayes is No. 6 in the 149-pound division, and will likely face redshirt junior Steve Bleise Friday.  At 174 pounds, redshirt senior Bo Jordan looks to build off of his 3-0 win vs. Rutgers’ Joseph Grello. Friday’s meet marks the first of two meets at the Schottenstein Center. Usually the team’s home matches are at St. John Arena. “I haven’t wrestled in the Schott a whole lot since I’ve been in college, but a few times, and did a lot in high school, so it’s good to get back in that venue,” Jordan said.His brother, No. 6 Micah Jordan, will take on Minnesota’s No. 18 Jake Short at 157 pounds. “[Short’s] like a veteran, he’s been in the sport a while, so I’ll be pumped up for that match,” Micah Jordan said. Ohio State junior Joey McKenna will compete against Minnesota junior Tommy Thorn at 141 pounds. McKenna is coming off a win by major decision against Rutgers, and is a perfect 6-0 on the season. Both McKenna and Thorn are inside the top 11. “Every single week I’ve seen his progression, and Joey McKenna with energy? Watch out,” Ryan said.Ohio State sophomore Luke Pletcher will likely wrestle Minnesota sophomore Mitchell McKee at 133 pounds. The matchup between the two second-year wrestlers will be a chance for a pair of young up-and-comers to showcase their talents. Pletcher is already up to No. 2 and has yet to lose this season.  “They’ve seen each other before in high school. I don’t believe they’ve wrestled yet in college, but that will be a real big one for us at 133,” Ryan said.Ohio State completes its lineup with junior Myles Martin at 184 pounds, redshirt sophomore Kollin Moore at 197 pounds and senior heavyweight Kyle Snyder.Ohio State men’s wrestling team will finally be at full health, and is getting into the meat of its schedule, with dual meets coming up against No. 7 Iowa on Jan. 21 and No. 22 Purdue on Jan. 28 at the Jordan brothers’ former high school, St. Paris Graham High School in St. Paris, Ohio. read more

Read more →

Composer releases album of music for cats but does it work

first_img“We put on the music just a while ago and the cats just calmed down” 🐱🐱🐱 a lot of them are snoozing pic.twitter.com/epNjNZv7ja— Telegraph Trending (@TelegraphTrend) October 19, 2016 Tinkerbell is more interested in stealing the sandwiches for journalists than listening to the specially-composed cat music 🐱 pic.twitter.com/8DWenneohT— Telegraph Trending (@TelegraphTrend) October 19, 2016 Victor was quite charmed by the cello! @music4cats pic.twitter.com/Al14PbRlK1— Lady Dinah’s Cats (@LadyDinahsCats) October 20, 2016 Other cats also came to investigate and sit by him as he played the music.Cats have differing personalities just as humans do, so while some were sent off to sleep by the music and others were less affected by it, and more interested in food and their toys.The same was found by University of Wisconsin researchers, who published their work in the Applied Animal Behaviour Science journal.They found the songs elicited positive reactions from 77 per cent of cats that heard them.The researchers wrote that “cats showed a significant preference for and interest in species-appropriate music”.’Music For Cats’ has proven hugely popular, with Mr Teie’s initial Kickstarter campaign raising over $200,000. More than 10,000 copies of the album have been sold. So, it turns out cats like music just as much as we do, and now this invention means they don’t have to be irritated by human music, as they now have tunes specially composed for them. A composer has released an album of music specifically for cats to enjoy  – and on Wednesday night, The Telegraph went to the launch, which was also attended by 15 cats.The music, composed by David Teie, a soloist with America’s National Symphony Orchestra, and released by Universal Music, simulates purring, heartbeats and “sympathetic cat noises”, to put felines at ease.He launched it at Lady Dinah’s Cat Emporium in Shoreditch, which is a cat cafe, and it appeared to go down a treat with some of the cats, who promptly fell asleep.9-month-old Tinkerbell was the exception to the rule, however, and was more interested in trying to steal the sandwiches laid out for journalists. This is David Teie who composed the music for cats 🐱 pic.twitter.com/jXxThUcRWK— Telegraph Trending (@TelegraphTrend) October 19, 2016 Journalists and Wookiee the cat are listening to cat music 🐱🐱 pic.twitter.com/y0NLHG1NKU— helena horton 🐱 (@horton_official) October 19, 2016center_img He researched the hearing range of cats and sounds they enjoy, and sent the finished music to scientists to test.He explained: “This started as a test of my theory of how music can affect other species – I have taken music apart and put it back together again.”I’ve become a total animal nut! I no longer see humans as special – we are just another one of the species”. The music for cats sounded soothing, but the noises were slow and there wasn’t a catchy tune or melody like the music often played for humans in coffee shops.However, the cats did certainly seem to enjoy it. That is, until their food was brought out and they quickly ended their snoozes and ran to the food bowls.When the composer treated the audience to a live cello performance, Wookiee a large tabby tom cat took a front-row seat. The Telegraph asked Mr Teie whether cats snoozing to his tunes was an intended effect. “Yes, it is. The sounds are supposed to soothe cats and be on their wavelength.”I used different ‘purr’ instruments to create sympathetic expressions for cats. I also simulated kitten sounds and a suckling sounds they would have heard as their brains were developing.”As a violin simulates a woman’s voice, which is sympathetic for humans, so the cello simulates cat noises for cats”. He said he hasn’t yet managed to make noises which liven cats up – dance music for cats, that is – because our speakers don’t make noises which are high-pitched enough.Mr Teie is working on developing speakers which go above the wavelengths humans can hear, and to mimic the singing of mice, in order to make sounds which cats enjoy and also make them more lively.The composer and cellist said: “The cats have reacted like this because they have had to listen to human music their whole life – but this music is for them, and on their wavelength”. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more

Read more →