What if dark matter particles arent WIMPs

first_img Explore further (PhysOrg.com) — For years, many physicists have accepted that dark matter is composed of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). The fact that WIMPs can naturally explain the amount of dark matter in the universe – left over from the Big Bang – has been described as the “WIMP miracle.” Not everyone, though, thinks that this phenomenon represents an ironclad prediction that dark matter is made of WIMPs. “We know little about dark matter, since we can’t measure it directly,” Jonathan Feng tells PhysOrg.com. “But there are theories and models. WIMPs are attractive because they happen to appear in many popular theories of new particles and interactions. But what if there are other well-motivated possibilities for dark matter besides WIMPs?”Feng, a physicist at the University of California, Irvine, worked with Jason Kumar (now at the University of Hawaii) to re-examine physics models to find additional possibilities for dark matter. Their work, published in Physical Review Letters and titled “Dark-Matter Particles without Weak-Scale Masses or Weak Interactions,” suggests that dark matter could be composed of heavier, strongly interacting particles, or even particles that are lighter and more weakly interacting than WIMPs. “WIMPs are a very specific example of dark matter,” Feng continues, “but there is a broader class of particles. We found that some of the models also predicted the right amount of dark matter for the universe, but with dark matter that was much more strongly or weakly interacting than WIMPs. We are wondering if almost-exclusive attention for WIMPs is really warranted.”Feng says that WIMPs are thought to be right around 100 GeV in mass. However, there is evidence that dark matter particles could be as light as 1 GeV. This puts them far below WIMP range. “An experiment called DAMA has been recording dark matter signals, and there is evidence that they are seeing light dark matter particles. We have perfectly good 1 GeV candidates,” he says, “and now we can accommodate such light particles.”Some models seem to support a stronger degree of interaction between particles, Feng believes. In order to get to the level of dark matter we have in the universe now, though, these particles would have to be annihilating each other now. “These models imply that experiments looking for very energetic photons may be very promising.”But the idea of WIMP-less dark matter gets a little more interesting than simply considering weaker or stronger dark matter candidates. Feng says that WIMP-less dark matter could provide some support for the idea of a hidden sector – a so-called shadow world. “There are theories that there is a shadow world behind ours. It is a mirror world that is like ours, but doesn’t interact with ours. With WIMP dark matter, that possibility is remote.”“WIMP-less dark matter requires new forces that we don’t really know much about. If you could have evidence of this type of dark matter, it might be a hint that this shadow world exists.”Mirror worlds and hidden sectors aside, Feng believes that his and Kumar’s findings warrant a close look. “Perhaps the millions of dollar spent on WIMPs is not the most productive way to use the money. This opens up a whole bunch of different avenues for discovering what dark matter is.”More information: Jonathan L. Feng and Jason Kumar. “Dark-Matter Particles without Weak-Scale Masses or Weak Interactions.” Physical Review Letters (2008). Available online: link.aps.org/doi/10.1103/PhysRevLett.101.231301. Copyright 2007 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. Tracking down dark mattercenter_img Citation: What if dark matter particles aren’t WIMPs? (2008, December 12) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2008-12-dark-particles-wimps.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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Tailoring the optical dipole force for use on molecules

first_img(PhysOrg.com) — “Scientists have been working with dipole fields for quite some time,” Peter Barker tells PhysOrg.com. “However, most of the work is focused on very small particles, like atoms, or on larger particles, such as for use as optical tweezers. There is an interim region between atoms and large particles, and that is what we are looking at. We want to be able to control molecules a little differently.” This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Barker is a professor at University College London, and has been working on a process by which an optical field can be used to align molecules. Along with Simon Purcell, Barker has found a way to not only align molecules through the tailoring of the optical dipole force, but to also move them around. “This is, we believe, the first time that alignment and the ability to move molecules around have been brought together using the dipole force,” Barker says. Barker and Purcell report their work in Physical Review Letters: “Tailoring the Optical Dipole Force for Molecules by Field-Induced Alignment.”“In order to do this, we have a gas sitting at a relatively high pressure in a chamber. Using strong optics, we send a beam through the chamber, forming a hole of sorts. The optical field acts as a tractor beam, grabbing the molecules present in the gas and bringing them to rest. This makes them ultra cold,” Barker explains. Laser cooling in a similar fashion has been done with atoms for quite some time. It is standard practice for many experiments. However, Barker says that it is harder to produce ultra-cold molecules than it is to bring atoms to a state of rest. “This could provide a way to cool molecules to just above absolute zero, which is of interest for a number of research applications.”The process introduced by Barker and Purcell could also have use as a way to separate rotational states. “In some cases, scientists want to be able to separate out different states. Unfortunately, there is a whole range of molecules that can’t really be singled out in this way. With our dipole tailoring process, though, it is possible to separate out these states. We could also separate molecules of different types.”Another use for this process could conceivably be the use of light to focus molecules onto a particular surface. “We haven’t done this yet, but it should be possible get molecules to act as a lens, and then rotate the polarization to change the focus. We think that it should be possible to get features down to the nanometer size by focusing molecules in this manner.”“Being able to tailor the optical dipole force in this way is a big step,” Barker says. “In our experiment, we were able to both align molecules and move them around by tailoring the optical dipole force. Being able to align and position molecules simultaneously is something that hasn’t been done before with this force, and it has a great potential, both for fundamental research, and for possible practical applications.”More Information: S.M. Purcell and P.F. Barker, “Tailoring the Optical Dipole Force for Molecules by Field-Induced Alignment,” Physical Review Letters (2009). Available online: http://link.aps.org/doi/10.1103/PhysRevLett.103.153001Copyright 2009 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. Explore furthercenter_img Citation: Tailoring the optical dipole force for use on molecules (2009, October 29) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2009-10-tailoring-optical-dipole-molecules.html ‘Voltage Patterning’ could be next step in nanostructure lithographylast_img read more

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Research team develops facemapping app for global smartphone searching

first_imgArchitecture of Theia and information flow between its component. Image: arXiv:1106.5568v1 [cs.IR] The app, named Theia (perhaps for the Greek goddess of extent brightness) once installed on a user’s phone allows for searching for images transmitted by a centralized server. If a match is thought to be made, the photo is sent back to the server for additional processing.The whole point of the app is that there are times when most people wish for someone to be matched to a photo that might have been taken unintentionally. An image of a missing child’s face, for example, might be included in a photo another family has taken at a playground, or perhaps someone wanted for a crime is on the loose and takes in a ball game and manages to wind up on a fan’s smartphone as part of a bigger picture. Clearly such applications are all for the public good.The problem is, of course, that not everyone would be open to installing an app on their phone that let’s other people scan for, what are normally considered to be, private photo’s. The possibility of abuse just seems far too likely. Also, when you consider that the app uses resources when performing its searches, slowing down the phone for normal use, it’s hard to imagine many people agreeing to such a scenario, even in the instance where they would be paid some small amount for the processing time used by their phone.Granted, some might be amendable to loading the app and allowing their phones to be searched during certain scenarios, such as right after a child abduction, or when a manhunt is underway, but leaving the app running so that anyone that signs up for the service can search for someone they are looking for, seems like an invitation to disaster. What if an abusive husband is looking for his wife, or a murderer is looking for a witness? How would the people running the server be able to differentiate the good from the bad? And finally, it seems that such a system would only be useful if the majority of phone owners agreed to use the app, which hardly seems likely.Still, the idea behind the app is actually rather profound in that it highlights just how far we’ve come in a very short time. The idea of such an app just ten years ago would have seen both Orwellian scary and totally far-fetched. Explore further More information: Opportunistic Content Search of Smartphone Photos, arXiv:1106.5568v1 [cs.IR] arxiv.org/abs/1106.5568AbstractPhotos taken by smartphone users can accidentally contain content that is timely and valuable to others, often in real-time. We report the system design and evaluation of a distributed search system, Theia, for crowd-sourced real-time content search of smartphone photos. Because smartphones are resource-constrained, Theia incorporates two key innovations to control search cost and improve search efficiency. Incremental Search expands search scope incrementally and exploits user feedback. Partitioned Search leverages the cloud to reduce the energy consumption of search in smartphones. Through user studies, measurement studies, and field studies, we show that Theia reduces the cost per relevant photo by an average of 59%. It reduces the energy consumption of search by up to 55% and 81% compared to alternative strategies of executing entirely locally or entirely in the cloud. Search results from smartphones are obtained in seconds. Our experiments also suggest approaches to further improve these results.via I Programmer Facebook launches “Facebook for Every Phone” Java app for feature phones Citation: Research team develops face-mapping app for global smartphone searching (2011, August 16) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-08-team-face-mapping-app-global-smartphone.html (PhysOrg.com) — Researchers at Rice University have developed a smartphone app that appears both clever and interesting, but may never actually be used by anyone anyway. It’s an app that when combined with a centralized server, combs people’s cell phones looking to find photo’s that have a face in them that match what someone is looking for. The team describes how their application would work in a paper they’ve uploaded to the preprint server arXiv. © 2011 PhysOrg.com This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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OnStar opens gate for thirdparty developers

first_img More information: Press release OnStar changes over privacy concerns (PhysOrg.com) — OnStar staged a Sunday night conference at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas to announce that the telematics provider will open its application program interface (API) to third-party developers. OnStar also used the CES venue to announce that it has struck a deal with Verizon that will make use of Verizon’s 4G LTE service to carry a variety of content. The beam-up to bring digital cars of the future to 2012 is a competitive move by GM-owned OnStar to enhance its portfolio of services. Pragmatic locked-out uses will extend into lock-me-in uses in infotainment. The move is aimed at giving customers more reasons to be willing to stay with OnStar. Company president Linda Marshall said, “Customer demand is driving a new marketplace for a variety of automotive applications. With this step we believe we can broaden our portfolio, grow our business and enable our customers to achieve additional functionality from their vehicle using their computer, smartphone, tablet or other device.” Video: CES 2012 OnStar APIAs a technology-centric service, OnStar said it had to move faster than the longer automobile development cycles. Selected developers can plan on getting on board with OnStar in the first half of this year via its Advanced Telematics Operating System (ATOMS) server, which connects to over six million customers.Popularly cited statistics show that, over the past 15 years, OnStar Advisors have answered 346 million button pushes, responded to over 160,000 vehicle crashes, unlocked more than 5 million doors, provided 2.6 million with roadside assistance and routed customers to their destination more than 70 million times.Now OnStar wants to travel into additional, customized territory. Like other companies, OnStar has recognized that opening up to third-party developers can be a fast and profitable way to bring successful products to market.The possibilities include restaurant reviews, apps for cars with large fleets, social networking, gaming, and maintenance-related text alerts.Early users at the ATOMS gate will be GM-backed RelayRides, a peer to peer service that was launched in 2010. Last year, San Francisco-based RelayRides announced its special partnership with GM. Relay Rides is a company that has users renting out their cars to others. The idea is that OnStar subscribers who use RelayRides can unlock the reserved car through OnStar with a smartphone. The app will launch this year.Video: OnStar RelayRidesOn the Verizon side, the Verizon Wireless 4G LTE network will be used for OnStar service. A demo at CES showed a Verizon rep Skyping from the back seat of a 4G-enabled Volt. Using Verizon’s high-speed 4G LTE network, the vision is vehicle occupants accessing streaming content from the web, holding Skype video conversations and playing games.When asked about costs, a senior OnStar executive at the Vegas show said several pricing options may be possible.According to OnStar, developers interested in the API should contact OnStar at developers(at)onstar.com. Citation: OnStar opens gate for third-party developers (2012, January 9) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-01-onstar-gate-third-party.htmlcenter_img Explore further © 2011 PhysOrg.com This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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BaTboT is up for imitating smart bat maneuvers

first_img © 2012 Phys.Org Explore further The interest in bats is because of the way bats change the shape of their wings, which has potential for improving the maneuverability of these air devices. Julian Colorado and colleagues at the Polytechnic University of Madrid, Spain and at Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island, built the drone with an end goal in mind—more agile, autonomous robots making more agile moves than can fixed wing aircraft. Colorado said that trying to mimic that level of functionality requires analysis of bat flight and novel technologies, ranging from design to control issues. Colorado’s team refers to their device officially as the “BaTboT” robot. They make use of shape memory alloys as muscle like actuators, behaving as biceps and triceps along the wing-skeleton structure of the robot. The wing extends and contracts under the control of the shape-memory alloy wires that switch between two shapes when different currents are applied. The wires, between the “shoulder” and “elbow” of the robot, rotate the elbow, pulling in the “fingers” to slim the wing profile on the upstroke. This contracts and extends the wings in a similar way to the biological counterpart, said Colorado. The device’s wingspan was inspired by a specific type of bat, the grey-headed flying fox, the largest bat in Australia. The US military partly funded this research. The paper presenting the design of this bat-like air vehicle is “Biomechanics of smart wings in a bat robot morphing wings using SMA actuators.” Authors are J Colorado, A Barrientos, C Rossi and K S Breuer. A professor of engineering, Breuer is from the School of Engineering at Brown and he has been studying bats for over ten years. “There is growing interest in the energy cost of flight,” according to Breuer. Understanding bat flight can help further the continued development in small, unmanned flying vehicles“Bats have evolved with truly extraordinary aerodynamic capabilities that enable them to fly in dense swarms, to avoid obstacles, and to fly with such agility that they can catch prey on the wing, maneuver through thick rainforests and make high speed 180 degree turns,” according to notes from Brown University’s notes on Bat Flight Research. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: BaTboT is up for imitating smart bat maneuvers (2012, June 3) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-06-batbot-imitating-smart-maneuvers.html More information: The design is said to be encouraging, as an example of how robot construction can move from rigid components toward bionic systems made from softer materials and artificial muscles. (Phys.org) — Robotics researchers in Spain and the U.S. are studying bats for their design work on drones. Bat wings are highly articulated, with skeletons similar to those of human arms and hands. The researchers have built a drone that mimics the way a bat changes its wing shape in flight. Bats achieve an “amazing” level of maneuverability, says a researcher, mainly because of their capacity of changing wing morphology during flight. Specifically, the “Batbot” replicates the way a bat changes the profile of its wing between the downstroke and upstroke. By folding wings toward their bodies on the upstroke, bats use 35 percent less energy and reduce aerodynamic drag, according to researchers at Brown. sites.google.com/a/brown.edu/f … /bat-flight-researchwww.disam.upm.es/~jdcolorado/BAT/BaTboT.html Bats save energy by drawing in wings on upstroke: studylast_img read more

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New way to make a CuPd catalyst for the electrochemical reduction of

first_img Because carbon dioxide is a greenhouse gas, researchers are interested in ways to decrease the amount of CO2 in our atmosphere. One feasible solution is to capture CO2 and reduce it to energy-rich hydrocarbon compounds. However, this needs to be done using methods that do not involve burning more fossil fuels for energy.One method is to reduce CO2 using electrocatalysis. This involves using a metal catalyst within an electrochemical cell. Copper has been shown to be a good catalyst for the electrochemical reduction of CO2. However, there are some problems with using copper foils and crystals including low surface area, low catalytic current densities, and deactivation due to surface buildup. Copper nanoparticles have proved more desirable for these reactions, but their formation typically involves using surfactants, which are difficult to remove and often results in contamination.Sheng Zhang, Peng Kang, Mohammed Bakir, Alexander M. Lapides, Christopher J. Dares, and Thomas J. Meyer, in their recent paper, demonstrate a technique in which they can produce copper nanoparticles that are the same size and evenly dispersed on a thin film on an electrode. This precludes the needs for a surfactant and allows for smaller particles, which has better catalytic efficiency.The thin film used is poly-[Fe(vbpy)3][PF6]2 which is then treated with TBAPF6/CH3CN such that cyanide ions replace one of the bipyridine groups. These two cyanide groups, once part of the iron complex, serve as ligands for Cu(II). Electrochemical reduction of Cu(II) produces an ultrafine film of Cu(0) nanoparticles on the polymer surface.Zhang, et al. tested the generalizability of their technique using palladium to make palladium nanoparticles and CuPd nanoalloys. In testing their catalysts, CuPd had the highest Faradaic efficiency for the reduction of CO2. Furthermore, studies showed that in this reaction both CO and CH4 were present. Electroacatalytic activity was tested using a glassy carbon electrode and controlled potential electrolysis in CO2-saturated solutions of 0.1 M TBAPF6/CH3CN solution with 1M added H2O. Products in solution were analyzed using 1H NMR and products in the headspace were analyzed using gas chromatography. Products were CO, CH4, and H2, with CuPd nanoalloy producing the highest Faradaic efficiency for CH4. Additional studies on how alloy composition affects Faradaic efficiency showed that maximum yield for methane was Cu2Pd.The formation of CH4 is important because this allows for a longer lifetime for the electrode. CO results in degradation and carbon deposition. The formation of methane keeps this from happening so quickly. Zhang, et al. speculate that the reason why the nanoalloy does so well for forming methane has to do with a palladium hydride reduction of CO. Electrochemical studies without the hydride reaction indicate that methane production is tied to Pd-H formation.This technique involving the formation of metal or metal alloy nanoparticles on a thin film using coordination chemistry is a good step in finding ways to reduce carbon dioxide and form high energy carbon products that is environmentally safe and does not involve the use of contaminants. (Phys.org)—A group of researchers from the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill have devised a generalizable technique for making copper nanoparticles that are of a uniform size and dispersion on a polymeric thin film for the electrocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide. Their technique involves the electrodeposition of copper and/or palladium metal onto a thin film polymer via coordination of the metal to a cyanide-based ligand complex. Their work appears in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Citation: New way to make a CuPd catalyst for the electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide to methane (2016, January 12) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2016-01-cupd-catalyst-electrochemical-reduction-carbon.html Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. © 2016 Phys.orgcenter_img Stepwise synthesis of nanoCu. Step 1: A polymeric film of poly-Fe(vbpy)3(PF6)2 is preformed by reductive electropolymerization. Step 2: Cyanide displacement of a vbpy ligand gives the dicyano film poly-[Fe(vbpy)2(CN)2,poly-vbpy]. Step 3: Metal ions Cu(II) are incorporated by binding to the cyanide ligands. Step 4: The bound metal ions are electrochemically reduced to metal nanoparticles. Credit: (c) Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2015). DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1522496112 Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences New step towards producing cheap and efficient renewable fuels More information: Sheng Zhang et al. Polymer-supported CuPd nanoalloy as a synergistic catalyst for electrocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide to methane, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2015). DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1522496112AbstractDeveloping sustainable energy strategies based on CO2 reduction is an increasingly important issue given the world’s continued reliance on hydrocarbon fuels and the rise in CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere. An important option is electrochemical or photoelectrochemical CO2 reduction to carbon fuels. We describe here an electrodeposition strategy for preparing highly dispersed, ultrafine metal nanoparticle catalysts on an electroactive polymeric film including nanoalloys of Cu and Pd. Compared with nanoCu catalysts, which are state-of-the-art catalysts for CO2 reduction to hydrocarbons, the bimetallic CuPd nanoalloy catalyst exhibits a greater than twofold enhancement in Faradaic efficiency for CO2 reduction to methane. The origin of the enhancement is suggested to arise from a synergistic reactivity interplay between Pd–H sites and Cu–CO sites during electrochemical CO2 reduction. The polymer substrate also appears to provide a basis for the local concentration of CO2 resulting in the enhancement of catalytic current densities by threefold. The procedure for preparation of the nanoalloy catalyst is straightforward and appears to be generally applicable to the preparation of catalytic electrodes for incorporation into electrolysis devices.last_img read more

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A BoseEinstein condensate has been produced in space for the first time

first_imgThe device consisted of a capsule containing a chip holding a group of rubidium-87 atoms, electronics, some lasers and a power source. It was activated once the rocket reached an altitude of 243 km, producing a BEC in just 1.6 seconds. Once the BEC was produced, 110 preprogrammed experiments were carried out in the six minutes it took the rocket to fall back to Earth.The BEC produced by the team was the first ever produced in space and marks the start of a new era in BEC research efforts. An international team of researchers has successfully produced a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) in space for the first time. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the group describes creating a small experimental device that was carried on a rocket into space and the experiments that were conducted during its freefall. The payload of the sounding rocket in the integration hall at the European Space and Sounding Rocket Range (Esrange) in Sweden Credit: photo/©: André Wenzlawski, JGU Journal information: Nature Explore further Payload of the sounding rocket and all those involved in the undertaking, among them scientists of the MAIUS-1 project, employees of the German Aerospace Center, and employees of the Esrange rocket launch site Credit: photo/©: Thomas Schleuss, DLR More information: Dennis Becker et al. Space-borne Bose–Einstein condensation for precision interferometry, Nature (2018). DOI: 10.1038/s41586-018-0605-1center_img A Bose-Einstein condensate is a state of matter occurring after gas atoms with very low density are chilled to very near absolute zero and bunch up to form an extremely dense quantum state. Scientists are interested in producing them so that they can test their properties—theory has suggested that they could serve as the basis for highly sensitive sensors. Such super-sensitive sensors could be used to better understand physics phenomena such as gravitational waves. However, producing Bose-Einstein condensates is tricky, because gravity interferes with devices for producing and studying them. The current method involves dropping such devices from towers to allow them to do their work in a zero-gravity environment—but these experiments have just fractions of seconds to operate. Doing these experiments in space would be a much better option due to the microgravity environment.Realizing the potential of a space-based platform for conducting BEC research, the U.S. launched the Cold Atom Laboratory last May, though it is not yet fully functional. In the interim, the researchers with this new effort created a tiny device capable of producing a BEC and conducting a host of experiments on it, which they put aboard a rocket and launched into space. © 2018 Phys.org This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: A Bose-Einstein condensate has been produced in space for the first time (2018, October 18) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-10-bose-einstein-condensate-space.html Researchers are creating a spot colder than the vacuum of space inside the International Space Stationlast_img read more

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What to Do When Youre Bored With Your Routines

first_imgLast spring I started a new exercise class. As someone who dislikes doing jumping jacks, burpees and push-ups, I found the workouts surprisingly enjoyable — at least for a while. But after several months, my newish hobby began to feel like watching the same episode of a TV sitcom over and over again. Overly familiar with the class routine, my excitement had been replaced with boredom, a nattering emotion that affects us all. “Humans are remarkably good at growing accustomed to the positive and negative changes in their lives,” said Sonja Lyubomirsky, a professor of psychology at the University of California, Riverside, who studies hedonic adaptation. A 2016 study estimated that 63 percent of us suffer from boredom at least once over a 10-day period. While it certainly won’t kill us, researchers have found that chronically bored people are more prone to depression, substance use and anxiety. But boredom isn’t a character flaw. It’s a state brought on by a behavioral phenomenon called hedonic adaptation: the tendency for us to get used to things over time. This explains why initially gratifying activities and relationships can sometimes lose their luster.center_img Sometimes this is a good thing, like when “it comes to adversities like losing a loved one, divorce or downsizing,” Ms. Lyubomirsky said. “We adjust fairly well, but this same flexibility can be detrimental to how we respond to positive life events.” Read the whole story: The New York Times Even though we all feel apathetic from time to time, according to Mary Mann, a researcher and author of “Yawn: Adventures in Boredom,” talking about it can be embarrassing because it’s often seen as being self-inflicted. “Only boring people get bored” seems to be a popular belief, Ms. Mann said.last_img read more

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Vajpayee to be conferred Bharat Ratna on March 27

first_imgFormer Prime Minister Atal Bihari Vajpayee, a veteran Parliamentarian and founder member of the BJP who is held in high esteem across the political spectrum, will be conferred the Bharat Ratna, the country’s highest civilian award, on March 27, 2015. President Pranab Mukherjee and Prime Minister Narendra Modi will be among a host of VVIPs who are likely to be present at the Krishna Memon marg residence of Mr. Vajpayee in Lutyens’ Delhi where he will be honoured. Also Read – Need to understand why law graduate’s natural choice is not legal profession: CJIThe announcement for the prestigious award for Vajpayee — the first Prime Minister from outside the Congress party to serve a full five-year term — came on December 24, 2014 a day before he turned 90. Mr. Vajpayee, who was Prime Minister from 1998 to 2004, and has faded from public life due to age-related illness, is lauded as a statesman and has been often described as the moderate face of the BJP. The Bharat Ratna announced earlier for noted educationist and freedom fighter Madan Mohan Malviya will be presented to his family members on March 30, 2015 at the Rashtrapati Bhavan.last_img read more

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Depps daughter LilyRose lands first modelling gig

first_imgLily-Rose, the daughter of Johnny Depp and Vanessa Paradis, has made her fashion debut in the latest issue of Australia-based magazine Oyster.The 15-year-old girl was photographed in a quintessential LA garden by photographer Dana Boulos, reported Ace Showbiz.Lily-Rose shared on Instagram one photo from the magazine’s spread which showed her wearing a denim top. She looked pretty with natural make-up while being sun-drenched in the garden with her short blonde locks were blown by the wind.In another photo shared by Oyster on Instagram, Lily-Rose donned a round hat with coral eyeshadow and lipstick.Lily-Rose made her acting debut in 2014 in Kevin Smith-directed horror movie Tusk. She will next be seen alongside her father in Kevin’s upcoming comedy film Yoga Hosers which is set to be released in the US on June 1.last_img read more

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