CARIFESTA XII promises to be an unforgettable event – 12 days to go

first_img Getting ready for CARIFESTA Mar 20, 2017 Haiti making preparations for CARIFESTA XIIHaiti is currently making preparations to greet and host several thousands of people from the Region and other countries who are expected to converge there for CARIFESTA XII. The festival of arts and culture runs from August 21 to 30 and will feature events across the country. CARIFESTA, which is the largest…May 25, 2015In “Antigua & Barbuda”CARIFESTA XII Launch: a taste of vibrant, exciting event in AugustCARIFESTA XII in Haiti next month promises to be a vibrant and exciting event if the regional launch is anything to go by! Hundreds of Haitians and CARICOM delegates converged on the Ibo Lele Hotel for the regional launch of the regional mega-event on Tuesday evening. CARIFESTA will be held…July 8, 2015In “Anguilla”CARIFESTA XII Host Country Agreement Signed with HaitiWith the signing of the CARIFESTA XII Host Country Agreement between the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Haiti on Thursday 25 September 2014 in the city of New York and about eleven months to go, the host country, Member States, Associate Members and the CARICOM Secretariat as key stakeholders in this regional…September 30, 2014In “CARICOM”Share this on WhatsApp Aug 17, 2017 Flashback to CARIFESTA XII – Haiti, 2015 You may be interested in… Jul 11, 2017center_img Barbados building CARIFESTA legacy Share this:PrintTwitterFacebookLinkedInLike this:Like Loading… CARICOM congratulates Haiti Dec 31, 2015 CARIFESTA XII will be held in Haiti from 21-30 August, 2015. Artistic Consultant, L’Antoinette Stines invites all to what she is confident will be an “unforgettable event”.last_img read more

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Hampshire: It’s a dive of activity

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Gallery: DOF in double contract win

first_imgNorway’s DOF ASA has secured two contract extensions; one for its vessels Skandi Caledonia and the other one is for Skandi Gamma. The company secured 6 months extension with Maersk UK for the Skandi Caledonia. The contract extension is scheduled to start in October 2015.Skandi Caledonia is a large Platform Supply Vessel (PSV) built in 2003 and it has worked for Maersk since delivery.Furthermore, Statoil has exercised its first one year option for Skandi Gamma which is applicable from February 2015.Skandi Gamma was delivered to DOF in 2011 and it has been on charter with Statoil since then.Skandi Gamma is an LNG powered Platform Supply Vessel (PSV) with NMD Standby Notation & Oilrec/NOFO Capabilities. The vessel can accommodate up to 25 persons in 19 single and 3 double cabins.Offshore Energy Today Staff[mappress mapid=”1056″]last_img read more

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QED Naval Begins Subhub Trials

first_imgQED Naval launched the Subhub Operational model last week at Forth Estuary Engineering’s (FEE) dock in Leith. As the company reports, the last few weeks have been full of activity finalising the setup of the ballast systems, instrumentation, and the dock access and testing arrangements.The Subhub, a foundation structure for wave and tidal turbines, will now be put through its passes to test the stability during installation, ballast system control and installation/retrieval methods.The Director of QED Naval, Jeremy Smith, said: “A lot of hard work has gone into getting the Subhub project to this point which is a credit to the team and supporting companies. The Operations model represents a big step forward for the Subhub project de-risking the ballast system and installation/retrieval methods which is a key selling point used to reduce the cost of deployment and overall the cost of energy.”last_img read more

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Law firm ‘disarray’ over retirement proposals

first_imgProposed changes to the mandatory retirement age would pose management challenges for law firms and throw succession plans into ‘disarray’, employment lawyers have warned. The Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) has published a series of proposals this week to allow people, including solicitors, the right to stay in employment beyond 65. The proposals include the abolition of the default retirement age and the extension of the right to request flexible working to help balance caring and health needs with the demands of a career. The EHRC said the changes reflected the ‘demographics’ of today’s ageing population and, by retaining valuable skills, would inject billions of pounds into the British economy. Audrey Williams, a partner and head of discrimination law at City firm Eversheds, said it was ‘just a matter of time’ before the EHRC’s proposals became fact, whether it was through the Equality Bill or the government’s promised consultation and review. ‘The challenge for management will be to align the new retirement rules with the development needs of the firm,’ she said. The right balance of skills was needed so that associates can step up when the time is right, she added. ‘But how can you ask someone to tell you when they are planning to retire without risking an age discrimination claim? Your succession plans will be in utter disarray.’ Ronnie Fox, name partner at City employment firm Fox Lawyers, said the proposed changes were part of a general trend against ageism. The default retirement age did not apply to partnerships, he said, because partners were effectively self-employed, but the profession took its ‘cue’ from the business community at large and management faced challenging times ahead. Law firms, he said, must be more careful than ever to ensure age-related clauses in contracts met the criteria of being ‘a proportionate means to achieve a legitimate aim’. Baroness Margaret Prosser, deputy chairwoman of the EHRC, said Britain has suffered a ‘skills exodus’ during the recession and the problem has been ‘exacerbated’ by forcing people to retire at 65. The proposed changes will allow ‘greater flexibility’ to recruit and retain talent, she said.last_img read more

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New laws on the use of cookies

first_img ‘Strictly necessary’As before, when all that was required was the opportunity to ‘opt out’, there is an exception to the ‘opt in’ consent requirements where the cookie is ‘strictly necessary’ for the provision of a service requested by the user. The European Commission, the DCMS and the ICO appear to agree that this will include cookies such as those expressing language preferences, or cookies for shopping websites which help to remember what has been placed in the user’s ‘basket’. But where is the line drawn between ‘strictly necessary’ and ‘necessary’, or even merely ‘desirable’? The ICO warns that this provision will be ­interpreted narrowly, and makes it clear that the seemingly more controversial use of cookies for tracking and advertising will not be seen as necessary. With accusations of ignorance and fear-mongering coming from both the privacy and the tech-freedom camps, recent new laws surrounding the use of ‘cookies’ have not been without their problems. A cookie is a small file which is used to assist the operation of websites and is essentially a binary calling card. Each time your browser (whether through a PC, tablet, mobile phone and so on) accesses a website, the website might deposit a cookie onto your hard drive so that, next time you visit the website, it already knows who you are. This can be extremely useful if you regularly use a particular website and you would prefer not to have to type in your name and address every time, or if you have expressed a preference as to how the webpage appears on your screen. On the other hand, cookies are also used for more controversial purposes, such as tracking your journeys through the internet so that advertisers can target you with more focused adverts for things which they think you might want. In view of the concerns that cookies can be used to build a detailed map of personal data, the European Commission issued a new directive in 2009 amending the regime for electronic communications networks. So far, the UK is one of only a handful of EU member states to have done anything about implementing the directive, which it did recently through the Privacy and Electronic Communications (EC Directive) (Amendment) Regulations 2011 (SI 2011/1208). Before the amendment, websites were not permitted to store cookies on a user’s computer unless the user had been given sufficient information about what the cookies do and why they are there, and the user was ‘given the opportunity to refuse’ the cookie (regulation 6(2)(b) of the Privacy and Electronic Communications (EC Directive) Regulations 2003 (SI 2003/2426)). Now websites cannot store cookies on a user’s computer unless the user has ‘given his or her consent’, having been provided with that information. This is a significant shift from ‘opting out’ to ‘opting in’. Failure to comply may lead to investigation and enforcement by the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) and, for persistent offenders, fines of up to £500,000. When to get consentThe question of timing has also received some attention. The user’s consent need not be given on every occasion that a cookie is stored by a particular website. It is sufficient that the user give consent on the first occasion. There has been some debate as to whether consent must be obtained before the cookie is deposited by the website, or whether it will be enough to get it afterwards. The DCMS argues that, although prior consent should be the norm, there is no absolute requirement for it. Some say that this flies in the face of the express wording in the regulation (the requirement that the user ‘has given’ – in the past tense – his or her consent). It remains to be seen how significant this issue may become. Competition riskWebsite developers and their supporters maintain that cookies are harmless, unintrusive and, more importantly, play a key part in analysis of internet usage. Many websites are free for all to access, but to achieve this they are heavily reliant on advertising income. If online advertisers cannot properly analyse internet usage and focus advertisements on their target audience, then that source of funding may dry up, meaning that many websites will simply cease to exist or have to start charging for access. Critics point to this as a major risk to the competitiveness of the UK and the rest of Europe. On the other hand, privacy campaigners have long been fighting for better regulation of cookies and other means of tracking individuals’ internet use. They argue that most websites will operate just fine without cookies and that it really does not take much to ask the user to express consent. In any case, there is no reason why the internet should not be subject to the same laws and principles as every other aspect of day-to-day life. Of course businesses want to target their marketing as effectively as possible, but that should not be at the expense of the individual’s privacy. What is clear is that the debate and controversies have not yet been settled, and it is far from clear how websites will be required to deal with this in practice. Unless new browser settings can be developed to satisfy the government and the ICO, I predict that users will see a pop-up box or, as on the ICO’s website (www.ico.gov.uk), a banner across the top of the webpage requesting consent. That might even be split into two – one consent to remember the user’s details so that the website can show ‘cool stuff’ that would interest the user (following the Amazon model), together with a second optional consent for a wider, and perhaps more controversial, use for tracking the user’s internet voyage. Hopefully, websites and users will have a better idea of where we stand in 12 months.center_img How to get consentThe regulations do not prescribe how, or even when, such consent may be given. Critics have argued, and the ICO has agreed, that endless pop-ups requesting consent would ruin the user’s experience. Adopting the example from the directive, the regulations state that the use of browser settings might be one way to give consent. The browser could be instructed to automatically accept or reject certain types of cookies for particular uses, so that the user is not asked to give consent each time a website is visited. The Department for Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) and the ICO have championed this, but with a significant health warning that, while there are some cookie-specific browser settings currently available, the technology is not yet good enough to satisfy this requirement. The DCMS has reported that it is working with browser manufacturers such as Microsoft, Mozilla and Google in an attempt to bring the relevant technology up to speed. The government will not seek enforcement of the new regulations until that exercise has been completed, but it seems that developments are still at an early stage. It remains to be seen how the new settings will work or how, if at all, they can be implemented in less-customisable browsers such as mobile phones and palm devices. The ICO has taken a slightly stronger line, stating that it will allow websites ‘up to 12 months’ (that is to say, until 26 May 2012) to ‘get their house in order’, but failure to do anything towards compliance in the meantime will be taken into account when the ICO does get around to enforcement. The ICO has in fact already received several complaints of non-compliance but, at this stage, is simply writing to the alleged offenders with a warning. Jim McDonnell is an associate at DLA Piperlast_img read more

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CAL in Georgia take-off

first_imgCAL Group ceo Eyal Zagagi explained that the airline’s fleet of 747-400 freighters will be used to carry pharmaceutical goods, live animals and oversize or overweight cargoes to and from Atlanta.He explained that whilst previously Atlanta was an offline station, with services to and from the EU via JFK, it will become an online station as CAL believes that its catchment area has great potential.ATC Aviation will serve as CAL’s local general sales agent for the Atlanta area.www.cal-cargo.comwww.atc-aviation.comlast_img read more

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Letters

first_imgETCS in SpainSir – You reported in the May 2001 edition of Railway Gazette International and in the May 10 2001 issue of your newsletter Rail Business Intelligence that the signalling contract for the Madrid – Barcelona high speed line had been awarded to Alstom and the Cobra Consortium.This is not correct, and you should have reported that the signalling contract for ERTMS Levels 1 and 2 was awarded to CSEE-Transport of the Ansaldo Signal Group and the Cobra Consortium. The contract was placed by the Spanish infrastructure authority GIF after a tough competitive tender and calls for the system to be operational by the end of 2002.You should be aware that CSEE-Transport is the supplier of the TVM430 continuous speed control and interlocking system for over 2000 km of high speed lines in France. TVM430 is also fitted in the Channel Tunnel, and it is currently being installed on the high speed line in South Korea and also on Britain’s Channel Tunnel Rail Link.Jolast_img read more

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Egypt and FAO partner to improve agriculture, crop nutrition

first_imgEgyptian farmers are being encouraged to grow more nutritional crops, whilst reducing potential damage to the environment.Through a project run by the Ministry of Health, in partnership with the Food and Agriculture Organization, farmers are also being taught how to turn organic waste into fertilizers.last_img

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Fire destroys structures near police station in Nairobi

first_imgFire destroys several tin houses at Central Police station in Nairobi – Courtesy The Star, KenyaA fire destroyed property near Central Police Station in Nairobi on Friday.The Star news portal says the fire started at a facility known as Mabati house behind the station. They added that smoke engulfed the area including the cells and other facilities.Witnesses say they heard two loud blasts before noticing smoke billowing high into the air.The smoke and flames caused a heavy traffic jam along University Way as motorists tried to avoid the area.Police say no one was hurt. The cause of the fire is under investigationlast_img read more

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