AUDIO – CARICOM @ SIDS2014 – Dr. Douglas Slater Speaks

first_imgShare this:PrintTwitterFacebookLinkedInLike this:Like Loading… Six Eastern Caribbean countries deemed safe for travel – CDC Oct 16, 2020 Oct 16, 2020 Re-elected WICB President to meet Grenada PMA meeting with Grenada’s Prime Minister Dr. Keith Mitchell on cricket governance is among the first items of business for re-elected President of the West Indies Cricket Board (WICB) Mr. Dave Cameron. Jamaican Cameron defeated challenger, former Test cricketer Barbadian Joel Garner by 8 votes to 4 in elections during…March 9, 2015In “Audio”Heads put spotlight on tackling scourge of NCDsThe Region’s on-going challenges with Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs) came before the Thirty-Eighth CARICOM Heads of Government Meeting in Grenada on Thursday. This year is the tenth anniversary of the 2007 signing of the Port-of-Spain Declaration through which CARICOM Heads committed to tackling the scourge of NCDs. As a signal of the…July 6, 2017In “Grenada”#islands2014 – VIDEO – CARICOM @ SIDS2014 – Dr. Douglas Slater – Assistant Secretary General, Human and Social Development.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-FOnz9gAUfUSeptember 2, 2014In “Event”Share this on WhatsApp CARPHA Partners with, PAHO to Ensure Caribbean States’… Oct 16, 2020 Oct 15, 2020 CMO says Saint Lucia at critical stage of COVID-19 outbreak You may be interested in… Barbados releases new COVID-19 Travel Protocols last_img read more

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EHFD extinguish dumpster fire at the East Hampton Town Recycling Center

first_imgMembers of the East Hampton Fire Departmrent extinguished a fire in a dumpster at the East Hampton Town Recycling Center on Springs Fireplace Road on Saturday, February 16th, 2019. Independent/Michael HellerMembers of the East Hampton Fire Department extinguished a fire in a dumpster at the East Hampton Town Recycling Center on Springs Fireplace Road on Saturday, February 16. Independent/Michael Heller Sharelast_img

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NuCO2 report operating results

first_imgGet instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270. Subscribelast_img

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Aalborg® Instruments’ ZFM Mass Flow Meter

first_imgGet instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270. Subscribelast_img

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Atlas Copco completes acquisition

first_imgHeadquartered in Berndroth, Germany, MEDGAS has approximately 80 employees and operates from offices in Germany, Austria and Switzerland.MEDGAS will now become part of the Medical Gas Solutions division in the Compressor Technique business area.The purchase price was not disclosed.last_img

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Young CEDA Commission Meets in Antwerp

first_imgYoung CEDA Commission (YCC) will have their next meeting on 20 February 2015 in Antwerp. Subjects on the agenda are the CEDA Dredging Days 2015 with a separate program for young professionals, the media coverage and Young CEDA excursions and seminars planned for 2015.Young CEDA Commission has representatives from Belgium, the Netherlands, Germany and the United Kingdom.Two new members will join YCC for the first time: Friederieke Lehne from Hamburg Port Authority, Germany, and Louis-Robert Cool from dotOcean, Belgium.[mappress mapid=”19906″]last_img read more

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GALLERY: Petrobras’ FPSO Cidade de Caraguatatuba reaches Lapa field

first_imgThe floating production storage and offloading (FPSO) vessel Cidade de Caraguatatuba has arrived at Petrobras-operated Lapa field located in the Santos Basin, offshore Brazil. The production is scheduled to start in August. The FPSO Cidade de Caraguatatuba was in the Brasfels shipyard in Angra dos Reis, where the integration of the vessel was completed.The hull was built in MES shipyard (Mitsui Engineering & Shipbuilding) in Japan, and the modules were integrated at the Keppel shipyard in Singapore.The 337.4 meters long vessel has an oil processing capacity of 100,000 barrels per day and storage capacity of 1.6 million barrels of oil.The Lapa field is located approximately 270 km off the coast of São Paulo, at an average depth of 2,140 meters.The consortium that holds the concession of the field in the BM-S-9 block is operated by Petrobras (45%) in partnership with BG E & P Brasil – subsidiary company of Royal Dutch Shell (30%) – and Repsol Sinopec Brazil (25%).Offshore Energy Today Stafflast_img read more

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Are judges interested in legal costs?

first_imgIn a year’s time, everything is set to change in relation to lawyers’ costs. Among Lord Justice Jackson’s many and ambitious plans are a new rule on how to decide whether legal fees are proportionate (met with scepticism by many experts, it must be said), a new process for controlling costs from an early stage with electronically submitted costs budgets, and a new, more efficient, way of dealing with costs assessments on paper in the first instance, rather than incurring the expense of a court hearing. The driver behind it all is Jackson’s desire to tame an unruly costs beast that has got out of control in recent times. But the reforms will work only if those responsible for implementing them are prepared to deal with what one lawyer describes in April’s edition of Litigation Funding magazine as ‘the elephant in the room’, meaning the judiciary. Speaking to solicitors immersed day-in, day-out in litigation, there is a concern that actually it is not the rules that are wrong, but the way judges are failing to stick to them; for example by not looking at costs estimates properly or ensuring that parties do not stray from them. Many lawyers see nothing amiss with the current Lownds test to assess the proportionality of costs; the problem is that it is simply not applied properly. Too many judges lack the understanding, or indeed the will, to address costs issues properly (after all, in the High Court at least, many of those on the bench are former barristers who have never even delivered a bill; they have had well-paid clerks to deal with money matters). Indeed, there is a line of argument that Jackson’s reforms would not have been needed had the judiciary made proper use of its considerable existing powers to keep a lid on costs and manage cases effectively. The lawyer quoted in Litigation Funding, who was speaking under the Chatham House rule at a recent conference, suggested that some judges can almost be seen rolling their eyes when, at the end of a long trial, the issue of costs arises; it is not as intellectually stimulating as the technical point of law with which they have just been dealing. He added that it is not uncommon to find barristers ill-briefed on costs aspects at the end of a trial. As Jackson himself acknowledges, judicial training will be essential if his reforms are to succeed. But clearly training alone will not be enough. With changes to the rules on proportionality, costs management and costs budgeting, Jackson has given judges plenty of new tools to begin fixing the over-active costs machine; but ultimately, none of these will be effective unless there is a change of mindset about costs from the judiciary, and a willingness to tackle the issue head on. Follow Rachel on Twitter Rachel Rothwell is editor of Litigation Funding magazine, providing in-depth coverage on costs and the financing of litigation.last_img read more

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Feeding into the industrial strategy

first_imgResponses to the government’s proposed industrial strategy will have been submitted earlier this month. I really hope the construction and development industries have used this as an opportunity to take the time to reflect on the crucial role we can play in shaping our country’s future economic growth. The strategy has drawn some criticism for being too high level and lacking detail. This is not a reason to disengage. Rather, I hope Building readers will have been responding with their comments and recommendations to help shape this country’s future economic strategy for a post-Brexit world. We have an important role to play in supporting the development of buildings, facilities and places that help enable greater economic growth, as well as optimising existing economic-focussed assets to be forward-looking and not a reflection of past decisions. We also have a vital role in delivering and maintaining infrastructure for the movement of people and goods.We need to consider how we can help secure and deliver the right infrastructure – both within localities and across regions – to encourage and support an agglomeration of investment and activity along growth corridors, growth clusters, and in specific places. We can’t tell markets how to behave, but we can influence behaviours to drive investment in science and manufacturing by creating the right supporting infrastructure. Currently, there is an understandable emphasis on building the homes we need. But it’s important these plans form part of, or are connected to, broader sustainable communities where we all want to work, live, and play. We need to create places which offer more than just homes if they are to be sustainable: they must offer work, leisure, education and other services. We know from the past that soulless and disconnected estates, away from jobs and amenities, are not sustainable or attractive places to live or invest.Too often, mixed use is just a bunch of apartments sitting on top of a metro supermarket. It can be so much moreI also believe we can be more radical about the way we mix activities – our thinking about what makes a mixed development and place has become too narrow. Too often, mixed use is just a bunch of apartments sitting on top of a metro supermarket. It can be so much more. Almost all employment-based activity in the modern economy can sit alongside where people live. Think of the Shard; there are shops, a viewing platform, offices, high-end residential accommodation, and a hotel, layered into a single building. The challenge is to take this outside of the heart of a great city, and think about why we can’t do that elsewhere.Away from cities, we still tend to separate employment and home – why?Obviously some economic and power-generating activities do not sit well alongside a residential block. But if we start to take some risks, we might find that people really get drawn to the sense of place modelled by 19th century industrialists, such as John Cadbury’s Bourneville. Let’s bring our thinking forward and really start to mix it up. And let’s not forget the homes, buildings and places we construct now need to be of enduring quality and capable of adapting to remain relevant in a world of constant change.This brings me to the release of surplus public estate where a new use is required. Although this is positive and appropriate, we need to broaden the focus to maximise the use of retained public assets so that they can more effectively and efficiently support economic and service development. We need to be clearer about how we can optimise the use of public assets, gain maximum value and enable productive rationalisation through a different lens. Change means there will always be a supply of surplus land and buildings. But resistance to change and to future rationalisation strategies will grow unless the drive is to maximise the use, value and impact of retained assets. This needs careful thought and collaboration with users and occupiers. This leads me back to infrastructure where there is also a continuing need for asset optimisation – from the roll-out of digital railways, that will allow more trains to run on the national network, to the significant need to improve the condition of many roads across the UK, most notably in local areas. This is fast becoming a personal crusade given the state of roads in my local area. However, it is clear that this is not just a problem in Tunbridge Wells. Too many local roads across the UK do not meet international standards and must act as a real deterrent to economic growth and investment. Local roads provide valuable connections for people, goods and services. They need to be seen as an integral part of our total network of infrastructure assets that play an important role in connecting our national and regional transport infrastructure to local places. This matters to all of us. The development and construction industries have a valuable role to play in supporting and enabling the success of the UK’s future industrial strategy. We need to care about what it says and feed in positive ideas to help shape a strategy that is relevant, modern and forward-looking, creating more winners, both by place and sector, and not just backing the successes that already exist.Richard McCarthy is senior director strategic services at Capitalast_img read more

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Jagulak places Demag order

first_imgThe four-axle crane has a lifting capacity of 100 tonnes and a main boom length of 59.4 m. According to Demag, the compact design of the AC 100-4L, its high flexibility and lifting capacities were among the reasons Jagulak opted for the model. In addition, the crane features Demag’s IC-1 Plus control system that provides the operator with access to real-time lifting information.www.jagulak-levage.fr www.demagmobilecranes.comlast_img

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