Priest discusses criminal justice, reconciliation

first_imgAs a part of a series of events from the Center for Social Concerns on the “Challenge of Peace,” Fr. David Kelly, the executive director of Precious Blood Ministry of Reconciliation in Chicago, delivered a lecture entitled “Violence and Trauma: Building a Community of Hope through a Restorative Framework.” The lecture was addressed to an audience that consisted of a large number of students participating in Urban Plunge, an experimental-learning course designed to engage students with poverty in U.S. cities.Chris Collins Kelly has worked on issues of reconciliation in Chicago since the 1970s, and he said his long tenure was an important aspect of his work.“I think my claim to fame is that I’ve been doing it for a long time,” Kelly said. “After a while, you do it for so long that people kind of recognize you and say, ‘Man, you were there before, weren’t you?’ … And if there’s a gift I have, it’s persistence. I just can’t see myself doing anything different because as of yet the issues are still out there.”He started his work on fighting violence and incarceration in Cincinnati after he graduated college and said the people he worked with represented a way for him to live out his priesthood. He then went on to work in the Cook County Juvenile Detention Center in 1978 and has been working at Kolbe House, the jail ministry of the Archdiocese of Chicago, ever since.“It’s a place that’s formed me in more ways than I could imagine,” Kelly said.For many years, Kelly said he worked and lived at a parish that was located along a gang boundary and remembers officiating at many funerals for young people who were murdered.“Often times, when I did the funeral and would accompany those families who had just lost their child … at the very same time I was working for Kolbe House which is jail ministry,” Kelly said. “As you know, in the United States we try our juveniles as adults so I would accompany a lot of families who would lose their children to extreme sentences … There were times when I would know both the one who had been harmed, and the one had done the harm.”Kelly said there was one such a situation in which one young man who he knew shot another young man he knew. He visited the one who had been shot in the hospital and visited the one who had done the shooting in jail, and he said that both men knew he was going to visit the other. When the case ultimately made it to court, Kelly said he felt that the focus was more on punishment and less on the well-being of the people involved.“I couldn’t help but think, ‘There’s something wrong with this.’ At no point along that way … did anyone ask [the young man who had been shot], ‘Hey, how are you doing? Are you okay?’ There was no attention given at all to any kind of healing,” Kelly said.Precious Blood was founded in 2002 as a “restorative justice hub,” Kelly said, and the five pillars of Precious Blood are “radical hospitality, accompaniment, relentless engagement of young people and their families, relentless engagement of stakeholders and systems, and collaboration.”Kelly said he sees a parallel between the work of reconciliation and the Triduum of the Easter season, noting that Holy Thursday and Good Friday are quite busy when compared to Holy Saturday. For him, it is impossible to move those who are grieving past their grief in a short period of time.“There’s not much on Holy Saturday. Holy Saturday is a liturgical void … That’s where the work of the Church ought to be. In that Holy Saturday moment. We have witnessed the trauma of the Crucifixion, and we hope and long for the Resurrection. But the Resurrection’s not yet … We have to be willing to stay in the muddled mess of Holy Saturday,” Kelly said.Reconciliation is an issue of “remembering rightly” and engaging, Kelly said. One of the strategies that his organization utilizes is a circle involving a perpetrator of the crime, the victim and other community members. The people in the circle spend time building relationships and a sense of community with one another before the perpetrator and victim discuss the crime, he said.Kelly said there was a situtation of a young man who burglarized the home of a police officer in the neighborhood. After the people in the circle exchanged stories and the perpetrator apologized for his actions, the conversation ultimately came to the question of what the actual harm of the burglary was. The victim said that his son no longer felt safe in his own home, and the next question was how the perpetrator could heal that harm.The victim said he would like the perpetrator to return to school because it seemed like he had potential. The victim agreed to return to school and with the help of another person in the circle, a retired school principal, was able to return to school even though he had been previously expelled, Kelly said. This arrangement took the place of a court sentence and ended with the victim offering to coach the perpetrator in basketball.For Kelly, that offer of mentorship would have been impossible without the circle.“In that circle, the victim became a mentor. I’ve been to court a thousand times. I never ever seen that happen in my life. I’ve never seen a court wrestle with, ‘What was the real harm?’ … That’s what can happen in a circle. You remember in order to heal. And what that did for our community, that gathering spurred other victim/offender circles,” Kelly said.Ultimately, the United States’ approach to criminal justice is too tied up in notions of punishment, Kelly said.“As a church, as communities, we can do better,” Kelly said. “But we still are punishing, trying to punish our way out of this. Criminal justice, crime and harm, is not a criminal justice issue: it’s a public health issue. We’ve got to treat this as though it was an epidemic and say, ‘What is the epidemic and how do we bring healing to this?’“Somehow, someway, we as a church, we as communities of faith, we can do better than this. We’ve got to commit to what’s hard, we’ve got to get proximate, and we’ve got to really wrestle with some of this.”Tags: charity, Faith, incarceration, justicelast_img read more

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Bennington Welcome Center opens to the traveling public on Friday

first_imgGovernor Peter Shumlin and Michael Obuchowski, Commissioner of the Department of Buildings and General Services, has announced today that the long awaited Bennington Welcome Center will be opening its doors to travelers at 7 am on Friday, October 11. This project, part of the Bennington Bypass system, has been under construction for the past five years, but in the making for 20 years or more with the support of three administrations.   ‘This new welcome center creates a beautiful gateway into Vermont through Bennington County, providing Vermonters and out of state visitors alike with the services and information they need to enjoy the region and the state as a whole,’ Gov. Shumlin said. ‘Led by a dedicated group of Bennington lawmakers, officials and others, we have been working on a Bennington Welcome Center for years. Friday’s opening is an important economic step for southwestern Vermont.’  Commissioner Obuchowski agreed, adding, ‘We couldn’t be more delighted that this project is close to completion and that soon we will be turning the keys of the building over to Joann Erenhouse and her able staff at the Bennington Area Chamber of Commerce.  The Chamber will be operating this building on behalf of the State at a savings to taxpayers.’   An official ribbon cutting ceremony will take place later in November. ‘Tourism is so important to the entire State, and we at the Chamber are honored we will be the ambassadors to so many visitors entering Vermont on vacation or on business from points south,’ said Joann Erenhouse, Executive Director of the Bennington Area Chamber. ‘I promise to work tirelessly to ensure that visitors who stop at this vital gateway welcome center receive the signature hospitality they are used to receiving at the other 16 State visitor centers.’  A group of of past and present members from the Bennington delegation, including local officials, toured the facility Monday as last minute construction projects were being completed.  Former Rep. Tim Corcoran, currently the Town Clerk in Bennington, expressed his delight that the Center was finally opening.  ‘It’s been a long time coming and I am sure it will be a critical asset to our region and the State as a whole,’ said Corcoran.  Rep. Timothy Corcoran, Jr. echoed his father’s comments and spoke to the importance that this project would have enhancing Vermont’s image to visitors and to the financial engine that tourism is to the State.  Rep. Bill Botzow, who serves on the House Commerce Committee, remarked that the Center and the bypass would be critical assets supporting the State’s efforts to enhance economic development for the region and the state at large.   Former Rep. Dick Pembroke, a long term supporter of the project, couldn’t have been more pleased touring the site and seeing his vision of the past 20 years come to fruition. ‘It’s beautiful,’ he said. Sen. Dick Sears and Sen. Bob Hartwell, both strong advocates for the project expressed their enthusiasm that the Welcome Center would soon be opening and begin contributing to the important tourism economy by fulfilling its important mission to the State’s visitors.   Brenda Jones, President of the Bennington Area Chamber, summed up the tour by saying the Bennington Chamber is proud to have this opportunity adding, ‘It is time now to roll up our sleeves and get the job done promoting and showcasing our businesses, attractions and communities across the State from East to West and North to South.’last_img read more

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More Americans Believe in Climate Change than in Global Warming

first_imgReuters:A new study conducted by researchers from the University of Michigan, show that more Americans believe in “climate change” than in “global warming.”The study, which will see its results published in an upcoming issure of the journal Public Opinion Quarterly, surveyed 2,267 adult Americans asking them a simple question regarding the issue of climate change/global warming.Read the whole story: Reuters More of our Members in the Media >last_img

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Eyeing college stress, sleep patterns

first_imgThe Boston Globe:MIT professor Rosalind Picard is worried about campus stress.After a handful of suicides in recent years, Picard started thinking about how her own work might be able to help change MIT’s emotional climate. The founder and director of the Affective Computing Research Group at the university’s Media Lab, Picard has long tried to turn emotions into something that can be counted and measured — following the “old engineering principle that for something to be controllable, it has to be observable.”Read the whole story: The Boston Globe More of our Members in the Media >last_img read more

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Green Climate Fund affirms its partnership with CDB

first_img CDB to Lend US$70M to The Bahamas and Saint Lucia,… You may be interested in… Oct 2, 2020 Share this on WhatsApp CDB, IDB Group to Boost Cooperation, Improve Lives of… Find Way for Private Sector to Assume Role as Jobs Generator… “CDB views the signing of this Accreditation Master Agreement as an important milestone in our relationship with GCF. This Agreement will catalyse our efforts to mobilise much-needed funding to build climate resilience in the Bank’s Borrowing Member Countries. We are looking forward to a productive partnership with GCF, having taken this very important step towards implementing innovative climate solutions in our region,” said Monica La Bennett, Vice-President (Operations), CDB. AMAs are the central instrument in the relationship between GCF and an Accredited Entity. They set out the basic terms and conditions as to how the Accredited Entity and GCF can work together for the use of GCF resources. The agreement is a prerequisite for all GCF Accredited Entities to implement GCF-approved projects. Accredited Entities are key to GCF’s climate finance work as they bring forward funding proposals to the Fund and then oversee, supervise, manage and monitor these proposals when approved. The Caribbean is one of the key priority regions for GCF due to its exposure to climate impacts and its needs of climate finance. To this date, GCF Board has approved a number of climate adaptation projects in Barbados, Grenada, Dominica and other Caribbean countries. During the second Structured Dialogue with the Caribbean in Grenada, senior policymakers and other stakeholders, including representatives from CDB, have been discussing the ways to improve regional cooperation on climate finance issues, to boost their engagement with GCF and to explore new investment opportunities. ### Share this:PrintTwitterFacebookLinkedInLike this:Like Loading… center_img Aug 26, 2020 (Caribbean Development Bank Press Release) – The Green Climate Fund and the Caribbean Development Bank (CDB) on Friday signed a legal agreement to open doors for more climate finance projects in the Caribbean Region. The signing of the Accreditation Master Agreement (AMA) took place on the margins of the Green Climate Fund’s Caribbean Structured Dialogue meeting in Grenada, and which brought together regional stakeholders to plan climate action across the Caribbean Region. Javier Manzanares, GCF Executive Director a.i., welcomed the agreement and stressed its importance for increasing financial flows to climate projects in the region: “The Caribbean is particularly vulnerable to climate change devastating impacts and significant investments are needed in the region’s infrastructure to strengthen its resilience. The Caribbean Development Bank has a long and successful track record and I’m convinced that our partnership is a huge step towards unlocking new climate finance potential in the region. GCF is looking forward to new climate projects by CDB and to working together to accelerate climate action in the Caribbean”. Jul 14, 2020 UK provides further support to CDB Special Development Fund… Sep 29, 2020last_img read more

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Banks face group action over mortgages

first_imgMore than 300 homeowners who took out shared appreciation mortgages in the late 1990s are now set to sue the two banks as part of a group litigation arguing that these products were unfair. Barclays and Bank of Scotland, which is now part of Lloyds, sold the mortgages. The home loans allowed older borrowers to release cash from the equity in their property while deferring interest or loan payments until the property was sold. Borrowers would typically repay the bank up to 75% of any rise in the value of their home. Financial Timeslast_img read more

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Trump’s victory has major implications for global markets

first_img2016 appears to be the year of political decisions that alter the fabric of the major markets we all work in.The US is the second largest export market after Europe for the UK, so the political changes in 2016 are going to lead to new ways of both exporting and working globally.President elect Trump has made it very clear that he will be seeking to boost American jobs and I can see that this will lead to greater protectionism – though this appears to be aimed more squarely at China than the UK or Europe. That said, the way the RLB Global practice serves local markets with mainly local staff, backed by international expertise means that this is unlikely to have any major impact on us in the short term. The US is also a key investor in the UK and Theresa May has already signalled that she wants to maintain a strong commercial partnership with the USThe US is also a key investor in the UK and Theresa May has already signalled that she wants to maintain a strong commercial partnership with the US, so I would be surprised if we see a significant changes in US-UK investment patterns.Trump’s ticket was to create jobs through investment in manufacturing and infrastructure in the US and I believe it is also likely that we will see an increase in US military spending. RLB North America already works in all of these sectors and so if these plans are followed through that will be positive for business.From an overall global business perspective I think that the major effect will be on investor confidence and currencies – which we are already seeing. The key area to watch will be how Asia reacts – particularly if Trump follows through with his threat to put punitive import tariffs on Chinese goods. That could tip the balance on the recovery in China following the Chinese stock market crisis earlier this year, and if that happens then the whole global economy will be affected.Ann Bentley, global chairman of Rider Levett Bucknalllast_img read more

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Jylland contract stays with Arriva

first_imgDENMARK: Arriva has retained the contract to operate regional passenger services in western and central Jylland which it has run since 2003. The incumbent saw off bids for the replacement concession from DB Regio and the First Jylland joint venture of FirstGroup and DSB. The contract runs for eight years from December 2010, with an option for a two-year extension. It covers the operation of around 7·5 million train-km a year carrying 6 million passengers. Arriva will receive the ticket revenue plus a subsidy to ensure the provision of services to the quality specified by national transport authority Trafikstyrelsen, which said Arriva had made the cheapest bid, with a 10% drop in operating subsidy saving the government around DKr20m a year.last_img read more

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Nigeria launches nationwide campaign against Lassa fever

first_imgUN launches aggressive campaign against yellow fever Egypts Journalists Syndicate launches campaign against journalists detention Lassa fever is transmitted to humans from contacts with food or household items contaminated with rodent faeces or urine [File: Simon Akam/Reuters] Lassa fever is transmitted to humans from contacts with food or household items contaminated with rodent faeces or urine [File: Simon Akam/Reuters]The Nigerian government on Sunday flagged off a nationwide campaign to eradicate Lassa fever as the death toll from the disease has risen to more than 100 this year.Nigerian Minister of Environment Mohammad Abubakar urged Nigerians to protect their homes from rats and other rodents because they are the vectors through which the disease can be easily spread, especially where sanitation is poor.The minister said the ministry will ensure that the country’s environment is kept clean, which is the most effective way to prevent the disease.Lassa fever is an acute hemorrhagic disease caused by Lassa virus, which is transmitted to humans through contact with food or household items contaminated by rodent feces.Relatedcenter_img Zimbabwe launches diabetes awareness campaignlast_img read more

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PM defends House Speaker’s office

first_img Sharing is caring! LocalNewsPolitics PM defends House Speaker’s office by: Dominica Vibes News – August 1, 2018 Prime Minister Roosevelt SkerritPrime Minister Roosevelt Skerrit has defended the office which the Speaker of the House of Assembly Alix Boyd-Knight holds. Before moving a motion to have the House which was in session be adjourned sine die on Tuesday 31 July 2018, Mr. Skerrit said, “I think people don’t know or understand and not through any mischievous reasons…I don’t think there has been sufficient education of the public on the extent of the responsibilities of the Speaker of the House.”He said many think that the Speaker only shows up dressed in her black and gold robe to sit at her chair however said she is also an administrator. “I think in Dominica we never really accorded the Speaker of the House with the seriousness with which that office is.”He explained that in the United States the Speaker of the House is third in line to be President if a sitting President and Vice President dies. “In many countries it is like that and even in our constitution too I believe, in respect to President that the Speaker can in fact become the President.”In Dominica Mr. Skerrit said, the kind of respect and authority due to the Speaker is not given. “It’s a very demanding job.” Share 220 Views   one commentcenter_img Share Tweet Sharelast_img read more

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