Transportation

first_imgBase TransportationOffutt AFB offers a base shuttle bus that will allow you to get near most work locations on the base. The base shuttle runs Monday through Friday excluding holidays and weekends. The daily schedule is as follows: 6:15 am – 9:00 a m, 11:00 am – 1:30 pm and 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm. During ACC, 55th Wing productivity days and base exercise the bus route will run as mission permits during the following hours only: 6:45 am – 8:15 am, 11:00 am – 12:30 pm and 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm.last_img read more

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Alexandra Silber & Broadway Friends to Read After Anatevka Off-Broadway for Release on Audible

first_imgFiddler on the Roof alum Alexandra Silber will gather a group of talented stage friends for an upcoming literary and musical evening featuring her acclaimed Fiddler sequel novel After Anatevka. The event, to be held at off-Broadway’s Minetta Lane Theatre on August 13 at 7:00pm, will be recorded for release on Audible.The night will feature new songs written by Broadway composers inspired by excerpts from the novel. Joining Silber will be her former Fiddler co-star Samantha Massell and Fiddler lyricist Sheldon Harnick, along with Patrick Page, Santino Fontana, Jessica Fontana, Ellie Fishman and Ben Moss, who will serve as the evening’s musical director.Picking up where Fiddler on the Roof left off (based on the original stories by Sholem Aleichem), After Anatevka centers on Tevye’s daughter Hodel and the adversities she faces in her extraordinary attempt to reunite with her politically imprisoned fiancé at a Siberian work camp.Silber first presented a starry reading of After Anatevka at the 92nd Street Y in 2017. View Commentslast_img read more

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Before She Lets It Go: Caissie Levy on What It Takes to Play Elsa in Frozen on Broadway

first_img In the corporate world, employees leaving a job are often asked to sit through an exit interview with HR about their time at the company. That concept doesn’t exist for Broadway performers, but we love checking in with stars as they finish up a successful run. Caissie Levy, who will take her final bow as Elsa in Disney’s Frozen on Broadway on February 16, has a long list of stage credits to her name. She made her Broadway debut in Hairspray, performed the role of Maureen on tour with Rent and played Elphaba in Los Angeles. She returned to Broadway to make a splash in Hair, Ghost the Musical and Les Misérables. Before Levy lets it go one last time at the St. James Theatre, we asked her what it takes to play Disney’s coldest princess.How did you feel when you first got this job?Nervous and wildly excited.How do you feel now that you’re leaving? Really good! It’s time to pass the torch. I feel a massive amount of satisfaction in what I’ve helped create in Elsa and in this production. I’m proud of myself, and looking forward.What are three words you would use to describe your experience? Beautiful. Badass. Sparkly.What was the easiest thing about this job? Nothing about playing Elsa is easy, but when Fran Curry is your dresser, everything is easier. She’s the greatest, and I’m so lucky to have had her by my side through it all.What was the hardest thing? Attempting the balancing act of motherhood and Elsa-hood. It has been extraordinarily difficult. But absolutely worth it.What was the highlight of your time at this job? The people. Our stage managers, the stellar crew at the St. James, our insanely talented and hilarious cast, and everyone at Disney. I’ve made friends for life.What skills do you think are required for future job applicants? Bravery, discipline, leadership.What advice would you give to future employees in your job position? Work your ass off and then trust yourself.How do you think you’ve grown? I feel stronger and more generous than ever before.Why are you leaving?To play Rose Stopnick Gellman in the Broadway revival of Caroline, Or Change.What will you miss the most? The astonishing sound of applause, wonder and elation that rushes at me from the crowd at the end of “Let It Go.” It is absolute magic. Related Shows Caissie Levy (Photos: Deen Van Meer; Graphics by Ryan Casey for Broadway.com) Frozen Caissie Levycenter_img View Comments Star Files Show Closed This production ended its run on March 11, 2020last_img read more

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ANEW Place closes on purchase of Champlain Inn

first_imgThe purchase realizes Mayor Weinberger’s long-held goal of establishing a year-round low-barrier facility for BurlingtonVermont Business Magazine ANEW Place today announced the purchase of the Champlain Inn at 165 Shelburne Road, and its plans to transform the space to provide temporary housing for those in our community who are experiencing homelessness. The Inn will fill the void left by the closing of the low-barrier shelter on South Winooski Ave, and realize the goal of establishing a year-round low-barrier option in Burlington that Mayor Miro Weinberger articulated in his 2017 State of the City and has budgeted local funds for in recent budget cycles. The City actively worked to support ANEW Place’s efforts through technical assistance, an emergency resolution, and funding for ongoing operations, and by fully backing and advocating for Covid-emergency funds to be used for this project.At the Inn, there will be space for up to 50 people experiencing homelessness to access shelter in a way that is Covid-safe and available throughout the year. ANEW Place will provide Inn guests with onsite services, including case managers and assistance with finding permanent housing.“ANEW Place is excited for the opportunity to purchase and reimagine the Champlain Inn,” said Kevin Pounds, Director of ANEW Place “Thank you to the Vermont Housing & Conservation Board for believing in this project and providing the federal funds to make it possible. All of us have been impacted in some way by the COVID crisis, and this is especially true for the increasing number of our neighbors experiencing homelessness. Our hope and prayer is the Champlain Inn will be a place where people, regardless of their situation and story, experience a new start. ANEW Place is blessed with an incredible team of people who’ve moved this project forward: Cindy Reid with Cathedral Square, Mark Sammut with Wright & Morrissey Inc., Bob Duncan with Duncan Wisniewski Architecture, Grace Ciffo with CEDO, and Hobart Popick with Langrock, Sperry, & Wool. I especially want to thank ANEW’s frontline staff who’ve worked tirelessly to provide a supportive shelter environment in a basement, RVs, and tents while navigating the challenges of COVID. We’re only as good as the team around us.”“Low-barrier shelters save lives and are a critical resource for protecting some of our most vulnerable residents. The opening of a year-round facility represents a major expansion of our community’s capacity to address the challenge of homelessness,” said Mayor Miro Weinberger. “I am so grateful to the many partners who came together to realize this goal that we have labored for years to achieve.  I am thankful to ANEW Place and their committed team led by Kevin Pounds, Cathedral Square, and the Vermont Housing and Conservation Board for finding a way to leverage the great need presented by this global pandemic and turn it into long-term opportunity, and to the neighbors and South End City Councilors who supported this initiative. Having a year-round low-barrier solution is just one of the ways that our community is going to emerge from this pandemic even stronger.”ANEW Place closed on the purchase of the Champlain Inn on Friday, October 23, and funded the purchase with $2.5 million in Coronavirus Relief Funds granted by the Vermont Housing and Conservation Board (VHCB). ANEW Place will use the 33-unit motel to offer free rooms year-round for projected occupancy of 50 people. The property also includes a 2,800 square foot house that will provide space for on-site services, group meetings, and laundry facilities.Now, ANEW Place will make several needed repairs to the property, and plans to re-open to serve clients on December 1.Meeting the Needs of People Experiencing Homelessness During Covid-19 PandemicPrior to the Covid-19 pandemic, ANEW Place was operating the Burlington Low-Barrier Shelter at a location at 179 South Winooski Avenue. However, when the pandemic hit, it became clear that the facility was not safe for staff and guests. It did not allow for physical distance, had poor ventilation, and did not have space where symptomatic individuals could isolate.As a result, ANEW Place, the City of Burlington, and the State of Vermont worked quickly to find an alternative. ANEW Place shut down the site on March 26, and as a temporary solution, moved the remaining guests into 26 RVs at the City’s campground at North Beach. In June, this transitioned into a sanctioned tenting area with ANEW Place staff continuing to provide support.The demand for a low-barrier shelter typically decreases during the warm weather months, but this year, by August, up to 40 people were staying at the campground, approximately two-thirds of whom were not staying at the Low-Barrier Shelter during the winter months before Covid-19. This is true even as more than 400 people experiencing homelessness are using State vouchers to stay in Chittenden County hotels.With the need for a low-barrier facility clear, and the winter months approaching, the City of Burlington and ANEW Place began pursuing a plan to create a tiny home community for people experiencing homelessness on City-owned land on Sears Lane. However, funding for that plan proved difficult to secure. “It was August, our backs were against the wall, and we were praying for a miracle,” says Kevin Pounds, Director of ANEW Place. Kevin met with Champlain Housing Trust COO Michael Monte to identify possible facilities, and only the Champlain Inn met the needs of a low-barrier facility. Though the Inn was not for sale, Kevin reached out to the owner and initiated a discussion about purchase.Hurdles remained. On October 5, the Burlington City Council approved an emergency resolution(link is external) to amend the zoning of the inn so that people experiencing homelessness would have a Covid-safe option before the freezing temperatures of winter. The resolution aligns the occupancy permitted for a residential use with the occupancy that the Inn was permitted as a commercial use. Then, on October 13, the Vermont Housing and Conservation Board approved ANEW Place’s application for Coronavirus Relief Funds to purchase the Inn.At the Champlain Inn, each room will provide guests with a private or semi-private sleeping area, electrical outlets to recharge phones and for other needs, and direct access to ANEW Place’s programs and services. The facility provides space for physical distancing, has appropriate ventilation, and allows for the isolation of symptomatic guests – making it a space that meets the needs of the Covid era and where people experiencing homelessness will be able to access shelter with dignity and respect.“The Board believes the successful application for a grant of $2.5 million to acquire and rehabilitate the Champlain Inn reflects both the tenacity and heart of ANEW and the City of Burlington,” said Gus Seelig, Director for the Vermont Housing and Conservation Board. “In this time of responding to a pandemic, it has never been more clear that Housing is Health Care. The Champlain Inn will keep people warmer and healthier in the months ahead. We thank CHT for identifying this opportunity and deeply appreciate the hard work of Cindy Reid and the Cathedral Square Corporation in developing the application and planning for improvements. Finally, much thanks go to Senators Jane Kitchel, Tim Ashe, and Michael Sirotkin, Speaker Mitzi Johnson, and Chair Tom Stevens for insisting the a portion of the Coronavirus Relief Fund be used to expand Vermont’s supply of affordable homes.”“This project is one of several collaborations between Cathedral Square and ANEW Place,” said Cindy Reid, Director of Development for Cathedral Square. “The pandemic has certainly highlighted systemic inequities in our housing system. We share ANEW’s compassion for treating people in need with dignity, and for identifying and mobilizing resources to provide safe homes and services to help those in need.”History of Effort to Create Low-Barrier Facility in BurlingtonUntil several years ago, there was no low-barrier facility in Burlington, meaning a facility that welcomes any adult regardless of their sobriety or mental health. That changed in 2014, when Mayor Miro Weinberger ended the City’s long-standing opposition to a low-barrier shelter, and several organizations worked with the City’s support to establish a low-barrier shelter for the winter months. In the years that followed, the facility took several forms:2014-2015: First year pilot called the “winter warming shelter,” run by CVOEO2015-2016:In his April State of the City, Mayor Weinberger commits the City to a permanent shelter declaring, “We must now work with the State and private funders to move beyond a pilot program and find a way to permanently ensure that a low-barrier warming shelter opens before next winter arrives.” Second year, run by COTS for a season that spanned November 1-April 1; shelter had 50 beds but demand outstripped capacity2016-2017: Third year, run by CHCB for a season November 1-April 18 (season extended for 18 days with operational funding from UVMMC). Shelter had 35 permanent beds and provided 5,290 individual shelter bed nights over the season2017-2018:In his 2017 State of the City, Mayor Weinberger calls for the low-barrier shelter to become a year-round facilityMayor attends Chittenden County Homeless Alliance meeting to ask for the coalition’s focus and support for a year-round low barrier facility.Fourth year, run by CHCB for a season November 1-April 15, expanded to 37 permanent beds and provided 6,333 individual shelter bed nights over the season2018-2019:Burlington budgets local funds for expanded shelter operations for the first time. While responsibility for temporary shelters are generally the responsibility of the State, the City has budgeted funds for expanded low-barrier shelter operations every year since.Fifth year, run by CHCB for a season that spanned November 1-June 15, with the extended season funded by the City of Burlington. The name changes to the “Low-Barrier Shelter.”2019: Sixth year, run by ANEW Place, and moved to the North Beach Campground when the Covid-19 pandemic hit.2020:March: Covid-19 closes the shelter on Winooski Avenue, and the City, State, and ANEW Place partner to move guests into RVs at the City’s North Beach CampgroundJune: State funding for RVS ends, and City and ANEW Place sustain low-barrier services through summer with a tenting area at North BeachJuly: ANEW Place and Mayor Weinberger propose a tiny home development on Sears Lane for people experiencing homelessness, but funding for proposal is deniedAugust-September: ANEW Place develops a new application for funds to purchase the Champlain Inn, which is approved in OctoberSeventh year, run by ANEW Place, moving to 165 Shelburne Road, opening December 1 and staying open year-round!This section draws on information that was put together by the Community Health Centers of Burlington (CHCB) during the years that they ran the low-barrier shelter.Source: Burlington, VT – ANEW Place 10.26.2020last_img read more

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SM East graduating senior Ben Henschel credits student newspaper as inspiration for career path

first_imgAs a third-generation Lancer, the halls of Shawnee Mission East are a connector between 2020 graduate Ben Henschel, his mother and his grandmother.The second semester of his sophomore year, Henschel joined the student newspaper, The Harbinger. His mother was involved in the student newspaper before him, and before there was a newspaper, Henschel’s grandmother was part of the writing club.SM East 2020 graduate Ben Henschel joined The Harbinger his sophomore year, and credits the student newspaper with spurring his outside interests. Photo courtesy of Ben Henschel.Henschel served as the editor-in-chief and went on to become the 2020 Kansas Student Journalist of the Year in February. He said “the world definitely opened up” for him a couple of years into his high school experience, attributing a large portion of that to The Harbinger.“I’m just really grateful for everything I’ve done at East, especially the point where I did start at The Harbinger,” Henschel said. “That’s where all of my outside interests bloomed. Before that, I was just focused on sports and only sports, and it was really kind of dry.”While many seniors mourned the loss of typical milestones during COVID-19 shutdowns such as prom, Henschel said he was looking forward to the celebration of final deadlines at The Harbinger and the choir trip to Europe that was canceled a few days ahead of the U.S. travel ban, he said.Although his senior year came to an early end, Henschel said he will miss the hustle and bustle of walking through SM East’s halls. More than that, though, he said he’ll miss being in the same place with his fellow seniors, which may never happen again.Henschel plans to attend The University of Missouri, Columbia, in the fall. He said he hopes to find a career path that touches each of the passions that bloomed at The Harbinger.“I’m trying to seek out exactly what job I want to be in,” Henschel said. “There’s a billion things I want to do involving journalism, politics, law, but it’s so hard to figure out a path that’s going to hit all of that. I’m just trying to be realistic about everything.”last_img read more

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PTSD trials suggest ecstasy could also be a treatment for depression

first_imgShare Pinterest Share on Twitter Share on Facebook LinkedIncenter_img “MDMA has the potential to act as a rapid-onset antidepressant via its modulation of the 5-HT system and as an augmentation strategy in cognitive therapy,” the researchers said.As an outlawed drug in the United States and the United Kingdom, there is hesitancy in tapping into MDMA’s potential.  While the drug is classified primarily as a stimulant, its mild hallucinogenic properties also contribute to hesitancy and the stigma attached to hallucinogenic drugs.Additionally, neurotoxicity of MDMA is a concern. For instance, Patel and Titheradge note previous research reporting reduced levels of serotonin and its metabolites in the brain tissue and cerebral spinal fluid in a sample of those who died due to MDMA toxicity. Another in vivo study showed a reduction in serotonin transporter (SERT or 5-HTT; the protein that transports serotonin) density, an indication of neurotoxicity.Discrepancies in several additional studies are noted, however, and more conclusive research is needed to determine how MDMA may be neurotoxic before moving forward, with the authors contending that “despite MDMA passing safety measures for its use in clinical trials of PTSD, we believe that until the discrepancies in neurotoxicity data are resolved, it is unlikely that MDMA will be explored as a rapid-onset antidepressant because of the emphasis in both depression pathophysiology and MDMA neurotoxicity on 5-HT.”“The data from PTSD trials of MDMA assisted psychotherapy set a promising precedent that can likely be applied to depression. The use of MDMA as a standalone rapid-onset antidepressant is theoretically well-grounded, but lacks proof of concept,” Patel and Titheradge wrote.Research on the psychological effects of MDMA have been conducted on animals, in humans using self-report and prospective data, and in clinical trials with human subjects. In general, findings indicate promise in expanding upon current research, especially in using MDMA treatment as a supplement to psychotherapy to possibly enhance therapeutic effectiveness in the treatment of depression. Current clinical trials using MDMA in the treatment of PTSD may springboard this research forward. Stay tuned… Email Increasing consideration is being given to 3,4-Methylene-dioxymethamphetamine (MDMA or “ecstasy”) as a possible treatment approach for depression.In a review of current literature published in Therapeutic Advances in Psychopharmacology, authors Rachel Patel of Green Templeton College and Daniel Titheradge of St Hugh’s College discuss the pros and cons of treating depression with MDMA, noting that clinical trials already in place examining the utility of treating PTSD with MDMA have contributed to an interest in examining how MDMA may be used to treat depression.How might MDMA be helpful in treating depression? Essentially, the neurochemical mechanisms of MDMA link to the monoamine theory of depression, whereby the reduced activity of neurotransmitters (primarily serotonin, or 5-HT) is increased by MDMA. In addition, the capacity of the drug to make serotonin quickly available at receptor sites has appeal over traditional selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors (SSRI), anti-depressant medications that can take several weeks to take effect.last_img read more

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Ebola activity heats up as West Africa’s rainy season begins

first_imgIn its weekly epidemiologic profile of the outbreak today, the World Health Organization (WHO) said Ebola activity in Guinea and Sierra Leone has become more intense and widespread since May 10, when the region saw cases hit a 10-month low.Last week the two countries reported 25 new lab-confirmed cases, 13 in Guinea and 12 in Sierra Leone. The number is up from 12 reported the week before.Overall, the total of confirmed, probable, and suspected cases in the two countries and Liberia—which is now Ebola free—has risen to 27,145, including 11,147 deaths, the WHO said.No health worker infections were reported, keeping the total at 869, 507 of them fatal.Concerns over unknown transmission chainsThe WHO said several of the new cases are from unknown sources in areas that haven’t reported any confirmed cases in several weeks. It said rigorous contact tracing, active case finding, and infection prevention and control are needed to break transmission chains and get cases down to zero, but the onset of rainy season will make field operations more difficult in the weeks and months ahead.Guinea’s 13 cases were reported in four districts, with 7 in Forecariah district, an area that borders Sierra Leone. Other cases were in Boke (1), Dubraka (4), and Fria (1) districts. Boke borders Guinea-Bissau, and the western district of Dubreka borders Conakry, the country’s capital.The cases in Boke and Dubreka are from known contacts, but the case in Fria district came from an unknown transmission source, and responders investigating the illness met active and passive resistance in both Fria and Telimele districts. Earlier this week, a United Nations official in Guinea warned that continued violence and resistance is a threat to battling the disease and called for calm.Threat to childbearing survivorsSierra Leone’s 12 cases were reported from 3 districts, with 8 of them in the densely populated Kaffu Bullom chiefdom in Port Loko district. The WHO said most of those cases are linked to a single case that was imported from Kambia district, an area just north of Port Loko on the border with Guinea.Meanwhile, the country’s Kambia district reported its first case in 2 weeks, and so far investigators haven’t been able to find a link to a previous case, and they suspect that an active transmission chain has been smoldering undetected in the area for several weeks. The WHO said responders have reported several recent community resistance incidents in Kambia district.Three of Sierra Leone’s cases were in Freetown, and so far initial investigations haven’t linked any of them to any known transmission chains. One involved a stillborn child who tested positive for the disease. The mother’s test was negative, though serologic tests suggested she had been exposed to the virus.The WHO said the case underscores the need for pregnancy and births to be closely monitored in women who survive their Ebola infections.Repurposed drugs for EbolaResearchers who used molecular screening to test about 2,600 drugs approved for other indications for possible use against the Zaire Ebola virus strain found that 80 had some action against the virus. Zaire is the subtype circulating in West Africa’s outbreak countries.The team, led mainly by researchers from the US Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID) and Horizon Discovery, Inc., based in Cambridge, Mass., published its findings today in Science Translational Medicine.They used an in vitro infection assay for their first screening, and the drugs that showed some activity had several different mechanisms of action and ranged from estrogen receptor modulators to antidepressants.Their screening with an in vivo murine Ebola virus infection model confirmed that several drugs might help protect against the virus, including bepridil and sertraline. The researchers concluded that, because the drugs are already approved, they could quickly advance to clinical trials and might be useful for battling Ebola.See also:June 3 WHO Ebola situation updateJun 3 Sci Transl Med abstractlast_img read more

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UK’s direct property investment down 55% on 2007 says Jones Lang LaSalle

first_imgJulian Stocks, JLL’s head of capital markets, England, said: ‘We are back at 2000 trading levels. Some prices have fallen up to 50% since the peak in 2007. The first few months of 2009 may see further price reductions as rents fall, however, later next year conditions could change. ‘We are seeing signs of increased lending and the gap between property yields and interest rates is already proving attractive to some.’The property services firm said that commercial property transaction volumes in the UK have reduced significantly across all sectors as the UK market continues to be affected by the ongoing financial crisis and poor market sentiment. Large lot size transactions, principally central London offices and shopping centres, remain limited due to the lack of availability of debt. Since Lehman Brother’s collapse and the events of October there have only been two significant shopping centre transactions in the UK and around £500m of central London office transactions. Stocks said: ‘While it is difficult to put a number on 2009 volumes, we expect them to be broadly similar to 2008 but back-weighted’The market should start functioning more normally towards the middle of next year as pricing adjusts to levels that tempts buyers back and particularly if debt becomes more available again.’He predicted that the correction in UK prices combined with a weaker pound will make the market more attractive in relative terms to non-UK and global investors and Singapore and Japanese investors are already becoming active.last_img read more

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HOT 100: 100-70

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Reasons to look on the bright side of property life

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

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