Jesse Tyler Ferguson Marries Justin Mikita in Star-Packed NYC Ceremony

first_img Orchestrated by celebrity event planner Bryan Rafanelli, the wedding attracted 200 guests, including Ferguson’s Modern Family co-stars Julie Bowen, Ty Burrell and Eric Stonestreet, plus Jerry O’Connell, Rebecca Romijn, Zachary Quinto and more. View Comments News of the nuptials broke on Twitter, where the 37-year-old Ferguson wrote on July 21, “Never been happier. XO Goodnight!” The Emmy nominee and his 27-year-old groom recently collaborated on a “Tie the Knot” bowtie collection, with proceeds benefitting marriage equality and gay civil rights groups. Broadway and Modern Family star Jesse Tyler Ferguson married actor/producer Justin Mikita on July 20 in a ceremony officiated by playwright Tony Kushner. The wedding took place in downtown Manhattan at the 82 Mercer party space, with an afterparty at the Crosby Street Hotel that continued past 2:00 AM, according to usmagazine.com.center_img Star Files Jesse Tyler Fergusonlast_img read more

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From Margo Channing to Tom Hiddleston: What to See in London in 2019

first_imgA new year brings with it the promise of theatrical bounty, nowhere more so than in London where the calendar buzzes across the year. From a flotilla of musical transfers from Broadway on to starry revivals and provocative-sounding new plays, 2019 promises excitement aplenty on and off the West End. Below are five openings within the first few months of the year guaranteed to set the pulse racing.1. When We Have Sufficiently Tortured Each OtherNational Theatre/Dorfman, opens January 23Cate Blanchett has appeared before on the London stage, in the West End in Plenty and at the Barbican in Big and Small. But only now is the two-time Oscar winner making her National Theatre debut in an ominously titled new play from the maverick playwright Martin Crimp in which Blanchett stars alongside Tony winner Stephen Dillane (The Real Thing); the director is a further English theater renegade in Katie Mitchell. To accommodate predictably high demand in the smallest of the National’s three stages, tickets are being sold via lottery.2. All About EveNoel Coward Theatre, opens February 13As it happens, Cate Blanchett was first announced to headline this stage adaptation of the venerable Bette Davis/Anne Baxter film that won the Best Picture Oscar in 1950. But the part of Margo Channing will instead go to Gillian Anderson, with Lily James (a recent West End Juliet in Shakespeare’s play) as the conniving young actress, Eve Harrington, who worms her way into Margo’s life. The bustling supporting cast includes musicals name Julian Ovenden, Sheila Reid and Stanley Townsend, with heavyweight Ivo van Hove on hand to direct, fresh from his Broadway triumph with the Bryan Cranston-led Network.3. ShipwreckAlmeida Theatre, opens February 19The American writer Anne Washburn has become something of a house regular at north London’s Almeida Theatre, between the controversial U.K. debut of her play Mr. Burns and her Christmas 2017 entry, The Twilight Zone, which transfers in March to the West End. But one can only begin to wonder what awaits at Shipwreck, which promises a story of dinner with, of all people, Donald Trump. Adam James, Raquel Cassidy, and Tara Fitzgerald head a starry cast and the director is the venue’s artistic chief, Rupert Goold, who heads straight from this to Broadway to direct the Almeida-spawned Ink.4. WaitressAdelphi Theatre, opens March 7The West End is poised to be awash with Broadway musical hits during a year that also finds Come From Away and Dear Evan Hansen jumping the pond: London and New York becoming ever more interchangeable. Arriving in between both those titles is the British premiere of Waitress, the Sara Bareilles musical that will allow Katharine McPhee to reprise the part of the pie-serving Jenna that she has previously played on Broadway. Her co-stars include 30 Rock’s Jack McBrayer, Dreamgirls alum Marisha Wallace, and English actor-singer David Hunter, the last of whom recently appeared at this same theater as Charlie in Kinky Boots.5. BetrayalHarold Pinter Theatre, opens March 13After a lengthy season at the playhouse bearing his name that was devoted to his various, lesser-known one acts, the Harold Pinter Theatre is mounting an extended run of the Nobel Laureate’s frequently performed 1978 masterwork, Betrayal. The director is Jamie Lloyd and his star is Tom Hiddleston in the movie actor’s first London stage appearance in more than five years. This very play last appeared at this same address in June 2011, with Ben Miles in the role of the cuckolded husband, Robert, being taken by Hiddleston this time out: expect crowds for return tickets, not to mention at the stage door. View Commentslast_img read more

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Hadestown Star Eva Noblezada Is Broadway.com’s Next Vlogger

first_img Eva Noblezada View Comments Star Files Related Shows from $69.00 Hadestown Eva Noblezada, the multi-talented Hadestown star who recently received her second Tony nomination, has signed on to lead Broadway.com’s latest vlog, “Little Songbird,” beginning on May 9. The vlog will follow Noblezada and her co-stars backstage and onstage at the Walter Kerr Theatre where the new musical is playing to thrilled audiences eight times a week.Written by Anaïs Mitchell and directed by Rachel Chavkin, Hadestown follows the mythical quest of Orpheus (played by Reeve Carney) to overcome Hades (Patrick Page) and regain the favor of his one true love, Eurydice (Noblezada).In addition to her newly Tony-nominated turn in Hadestown, Noblezada earned a 2017 Tony nomination and Theatre World Award for her performance as Kim in the revival of Miss Saigon. She was also a finalist at the 2013 Jimmy Awards.Tune in and watch Noblezada take Broadway.com readers behind the scenes at the new musical that is playing to excited crowds every night. “Little Songbird” will run every Thursday for eight weeks.last_img read more

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Rule would make experts in fees cases optional

first_img Rule would make experts in fees cases optional July 1, 2007 Regular News Rule would make experts in fees cases optionalcenter_img Mark D. Killian Managing Editor Should it be necessary to provide an expert opinion in all attorneys’ fees cases?The Bar’s Civil Procedure Rules Committee doesn’t think so and proposed a new rule to that effect as part of its regular review of the procedural rules.Keith H. Park, chair of the Civil Procedure Rules Committee, told the Supreme Court in oral argument June 6 it should not be necessary to provide expert opinion to support or oppose a claim or an award of costs, attorneys’ fees, or both, in every case. The proposed new rule would leave the decision to the judge to determine if expert testimony is needed.“Really, we looked upon it as a cost saving mechanism more than anything else and in most cases anybody can bring in experts,” Park said. “They can bring them in and have them testify. It does not take away that ability.”Marc Goldman of Miami, however, argued proposed Rule 1.526 would amend substantive case law and so is beyond the purview of the committee. He also said the rule as written would result in more litigation and hearings.Proposed Rule 1.526 went to the court along with several other proposed changes drafted after the Bar’s Commission on the Legal Needs of Children asked the rules panel to review the rules with an eye toward helping ensure that the procedural rights and needs of children are being met. Other proposed changes are technical or stem from a change in state statute. The entire package was overwhelmingly endorsed by both the rules panel and the Board of Governors. Only the attorneys’ fee expert opinion issue was debated at oral argument.Justice Harry Lee Anstead said he thought it unusual for the court to take up the fees issue through the rule-making process instead of through a case percolating up to the Supreme Court through a challenge.“Putting it in a rule seems to be a highly unusual way to approach this,” Anstead said, later adding, “This does not appear to me to be the appropriate topic of a rule.”Park said the committee has found, “the judge trying the cases probably has as much if not more knowledge and expertise on these matters than anybody testifying about it.”Park also emphasized that the proposed rule emphatically allows the introduction of expert witnesses.“If the judge feels like it is necessary to have it done, they can certainly do that,” Park said.Goldman, who said he has handled numerous appellate matters involving court awards of attorneys’ fees and the application of contingency risk factor multipliers, contends the rule — aside from being substantive and not procedural — as written is “ineffective and ambiguous.”“It is absolutely impractical to think the judge, except in very rare cases, when a motion for fees is filed and a hearing date is requested, is going to go, ‘Oh, yes. I remember that case. We need experts in that case,’” Goldman said. “So what you are doing is creating more hearings and more litigation.”Goldman said when moving parties file a motion for fees, they also will file a motion to require experts and there will have to be another hearing on that, as well.“Then we are going to have a diversity of rulings by the courts on whether the court required it,” Goldman said. “And then we are going to have appellate cases on that. The other potential is the moving party does not file that motion and comes into court with his expert. The nonmoving party may bring an expert or may not. In the case where the nonmoving party doesn’t bring an expert, the prevailing party is going to seek to tax the cost of his expert and the nonmoving party is going to go, ‘Wait a second, judge, you did not enter an order requiring this. Don’t tax it.’ Then we are going to have more appellate cases on that.”Justice Charles Wells said he’s concerned the proposed rule would do away with the need for a hearing and “probably these attorneys’ fee amounts need to be contested.”“What we are doing, it seems to me, is setting up a procedure in which you are going to have fewer contests about the amount of fees and fewer abilities to do it,” Wells said. “So I have a problem with that.”“We did not look at it in that fashion,” Park said. “We looked at it in the fashion of whether or not it was required. It is certainly permissive and from the standpoint of what evidence goes on, the parties are free to do that. They are free to prove it up anyway they wish. Under common and substantial evidence, you would still have to have the attorney testify about his time and about what the value of his services were. I don’t think you get around that.”Justice Raoul Cantero noted one of the problems with getting the court to address this issue through a case is the big financial risk that a lawyer would have to take.First a lawyer would have to attend a hearing without an expert when there is precedent saying an expert is required, Cantero said.“The trial judge is going to say, ‘No, you need an expert. I’m bound by the law,’” Cantero said. “The appellate court is going to say the same thing. They may or may not certify a question to this court. There really won’t be any — seems to me — conflict, and so the chances of us taking it are slim and then the chances of us taking it and reversing a 1987 case are slim.”Cantero speculated that’s why this proposal is coming up through the rules committee process and not through a case.( In Re: Amendments to the Florida Rules of Civil Procedure, Case No. SC07-173.)last_img read more

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Minnesota volleyball defeats top-ranked teams

first_imgMinnesota took set and match point with a kill from Wilhite.Despite her early struggles, Wilhite had 23 kills on the match with 17 coming in the final two sets. She earned her double-double with 19 digs, showing off a strong defensive effort.Paige Tapp had a consistent and efficient match, garnering 21 kills and hitting .594.Paige Tapp was the only Minnesota attacker to hit in the positive for the first two sets, and she held her team afloat in the beginning of the match.“I thought it was a really special performance,” McCutcheon said. “[Tapp] is a very good volleyball player, and she proved that tonight. Just a phenomenal night at the net.”Sophomore setter Samantha Seliger-Swenson had 51 assists and 16 digs on the match while junior middle blocker Molly Lohman had eight blocks.With that win, Minnesota has now won four straight five-set victories against top 25 teams, including the No. 1 and No. 3 teams.Minnesota also completed the season with a perfect 13-0 record at the Sports Pavilion, matching their perfect home record of last year. Minnesota volleyball defeats top-ranked teamsThe No. 2 Gophers defeated No. 1 Nebraska and No. 3 WisconsinCarter JonesGophers outside hitter Sarah Wilhite winds up a spike against Wisconsin on Saturday, Nov. 26, 2016 at the Sports Pavilion. Tommy SlettenNovember 30, 2016Jump to CommentsShare on FacebookShare on TwitterShare via EmailPrintMinnesota was poised to end its regular season on a high note after coming off a Wednesday win against No. 1 Nebraska.No. 2 Minnesota defeated No. 3 Wisconsin Saturday in five sets, going undefeated at home for the second year in a row and beating ita border rivals on senior night at the Sports Pavilion. “To our athletes’ credit, their commitment to playing it point-to-point and staying in the match was really phenomenal,” head coach Hugh McCutcheon said. “I can’t imagine there’s been a better series of four matches played by any team.”Minnesota was slow through the first three sets, losing the first and third — with 25-11, the third set was the Gophers’ lowest scoring set all season.In between the third and fourth set, Minnesota needed a spark from a leader on the team, and senior outside hitter Sarah Wilhite answered the team’s call.“I think I just approached it a bit differently,” Wilhite said. “Katie [Schau] actually pulled me aside and just told me to be the leader that I have been, and that really challenged me to step up.” Wilhite provided 10 kills in the fourth set, adding to the consistent play from middle blocker Paige Tapp.Minnesota went on to win 25-17, forcing a fifth and final set and stealing away Wisconsin’s momentum.The Gophers started the fifth set hot, going on a 6-2 run with five kills from Wilhite. Minnesota made quick work of Wisconsin throughout the rest of the match, headlined by a 5-0 run midway through the set.last_img read more

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Probing the Moist Crevices of Word Aversion

first_imgScientific American:Warning: this article contains a word that you might find offensive. In fact, some readers might find it so deeply unsettling that they might begin to wonder about the cause of their aversion. What is it about this word that generates such a visceral experience of revulsion and discomfort? Is it something about the particular combination of sounds it forces us to utter? Maybe something about the conceptual associations that it evokes? What proportion of the population also feels this way? Is this only true of certain kinds of people and not others?The word in question here is “moist”, and apparently 20% of the population equate hearing it spoken with fingernails on a chalkboard. An aversion to the word has become somewhat of a cultural phenomenon, with celebrities decrying it as an abomination of the English language, and outlets from New Yorker to People exploring its uniquely disturbing properties.Though on its face the thought of devoting a program of research to discovering why people hold such an aversion seems like the kind of topic likely to appear in the next round of arguments trying to defund social science research, there are interesting questions to be answered here that shed light on basic psychological processes. New research from Paul Thibodeau at Oberlin College has attempted to understand these processes and his initial work has suggested that the cause of the aversion may not be what most people think.Read the whole story: Scientific American More of our Members in the Media >last_img read more

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At last, scientific proof that daydreaming doesn’t mean you’re a flake

first_imgQuartz:Western culture tends to look down on daydreamers—as if it’s a childish habit that we’re supposed to outgrow, along with make-believe games and imaginary friends. But none other than Sigmund Freud, the father of modern psychology, thought that most adults daydream too little. Daydreaming, he theorized, is important for creative thinking. When we indulge in fantasies about our hopes for the future, we prepare ourselves to deal with reality.Now a new study, led by cognitive psychologist Michael Kane at the University of North Carolina Greensboro and published in Psychological Science, confirms that daydreaming can be positive—depending on the context and content of our fantasies.Read the whole story: Quartz More of our Members in the Media >last_img read more

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The next House hold name

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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Adult affairs

first_imgStay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Subscribe now for unlimited access Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our communitylast_img read more

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Construction Innovation Hub: if only we’d had it sooner

first_imgGet access to premium content subscribe today SUBSCRIBE for UNLIMITED access to news and premium contentA subscription will provide access to the latest industry news, expert analysis & comment from industry leaders,  data and research – including our popular annual league tables. You will receive:Print/digital issues delivered to your door/inboxUnlimited access to building.co.uk including our archivePrint/digital supplementsNewsletters – unlimited access to the stories behind the headlinesSubscribe now  SUBSCRIBE to access this storylast_img read more

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