Sue Minter statement on 5th anniversary of Tropical Storm Irene

first_imgSue Minter, Democratic candidate for governor: It’s hard to believe that anything good can come of a disaster. But five years after Tropical Storm Irene ravaged our brave little state, I travel with pride through a Vermont that is stronger and more resilient than it was before that terrible night when the flood waters rose.On this day five years ago, it was not assured that Vermont would recover well from the storm. What made the difference was the spirit of Vermonters. Everywhere I went, I encountered a remarkable depth of generosity and willingness to sacrifice for one another. The unsung heroes of Irene are the thousands of selfless volunteers: those who came forward to muck out homes, feed, clothe and rescue their neighbors; those who raised money and worked for months and years rebuilding over 700 homes for Irene survivors; those who rolled up their sleeves to rebuild communities ravaged by storm. We all honor the courageous survivors of the disaster, whose lives were turned upside down, but whose resilience and courage show us what it means to be Vermont Strong.Looking to the future, while Vermont does not face a natural disaster now, we do face many serious challenges. Seeing how we recovered from the worst disaster in nearly a century gives me hope. Because I have learned that when Vermonters come together, when we are all in, there is no such thing as impossible.last_img read more

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SYNNEX Adds Bose Professional to Its Suite of Bose Work Solutions

first_imgSYNNEX added Bose Professional to its suite of Bose Work solutions making the Bose Noise Cancelling Headphones 700 UC available to IT resellers and AV integrators. Customers also have access to Bose Work video bars, loudspeakers, amplifiers and processors.Bose Noise Cancelling Headphones 700 UC allow for collaboration in the office and beyond, offering work environment personalization and noise canceling, reliability in switching between audio sources and minimal interruptions with up to 20 hours of wireless battery life. SYNNEX customers can access the full Bose Work line card to support additional needs for remote, in-person and hybrid collaboration.last_img read more

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Here’s what the new mortgage rules mean for you

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr by. Gail HillebrandIt’s simple. Our new mortgage rules mean you will have more information and more protection when you’re shopping for a loan and while you own your home.In the run-up to the housing crisis, some lenders made loans without checking a borrower’s income, assets, or debts. That turned out to be a pretty bad idea. And, when many borrowers couldn’t repay their loans, the economy was hurt badly.Our new mortgage rules help change that. They’ll help protect you by requiring your lender to make a “good-faith, reasonable effort” to determine that you are likely to be able to repay your loan. That means the lender will check and verify your income, assets, debts, credit history, and other important financial information. And no more qualifying you based only on those initial “teaser” rates that trapped some consumers.More protectionsLenders who meet certain requirements for what we call Qualified Mortgages–or QMs– are presumed to have made that good-faith, reasonable effort to check your ability to repay. QMs have several characteristics that protect consumers. First, QMs can’t have risky features like negative amortization or no-interest periods. Second, QMs are available with some exceptions to borrowers who have a monthly debt-to-income ratio of 43 percent or less, meaning that the total of their monthly mortgage payment, plus other fixed debts like car loans, is not more than 43 percent of their monthly gross income. Most people taking out a mortgage now have a debt-to-income ratio of around 38 percent. continue reading »last_img read more

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Gopher football unveils a newer, cheaper ticket plan

first_imgGopher football unveils a newer, cheaper ticket planThe mobile pass gives fans tickets to all seven home games in 2019 for about $200.Jack Rodgers, Daily File PhotoA Gophers football player watches from the sidelines during a game on Sept. 16, 2017. Chad FaustJuly 8, 2019Jump to CommentsShare on FacebookShare on TwitterShare via EmailPrintAfter TCF Bank Stadium saw its lowest average attendance numbers on record in 2018, the University of Minnesota released its newest football ticket package on Monday — one aimed at luring more fans into the stadium seats.The new “Gopher Pass” will allow fans to attend all seven home games for the 2019 season for about $200. The University described it as the “most flexible plan ever” for Gophers fans in a press release sent out on Monday.The pass is an all-mobile ticket, and fans will have a digital ticket delivered to them by text message before each game. In the event of a sellout, the pass does not guarantee fans a seat in the game, just stadium entry and access to a standing-room-only area.Fans will pay an average of $28.56 per game, a considerable drop for marquee games such as the highly anticipated rivalry game against Wisconsin. The cheapest seat for the 2019 rivalry game on StubHub, a secondary market for tickets, is just under $70. The Gopher Pass is a part of a recent trend in University Athletics toward make games more affordable and inviting for fans.Earlier this year, the University decided to lower the season-ticket prices for both men’s basketball and men’s hockey games in an attempt to make sporting events more affordable.In June, University of Minnesota regents voted unanimously to allow alcohol sales in Williams Arena for basketball games and 3M Arena at Mariucci for hockey games, looking to boost attendance.The new plan is similar to one employed by the nearby Minnesota Twins. The Twins unveiled the “Twins Pass” for the 2019 season which allowed fans the option to pay for tickets on a monthly subscription-style basis with prices ranging from $49-$149 per month, giving them access to all the games. The Twins have seen their average attendance per game numbers climb to the highest it has been since 2015, due in large part to their success on the field.last_img read more

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Why the ‘cool factor’ won’t lure college grads to your city

first_imgA new nationwide study reveals that the kind of cities that attract college graduates has changed since the 1990s.In the 1990s, grads were moving to cities with fast-growing “smart” industries in fields like high tech, the study found. But since 2000, with a less vibrant national economy, college graduates are flocking toward the biggest cities with the biggest labor markets and the best chances of landing a job.In fact, the effect of city population size in attracting college grads was nearly four times as large in the 2000s as it was in the 1990s, said Michael Betz, co-author of the study and assistant professor of human sciences at The Ohio State University. Share on Facebook Pinterest Email LinkedIncenter_img “In the 90s, when the economy was booming, college grads just moved to places that were fast-growing, figuring they could find a job,” Betz said.“But post-2000, with the national economy not doing so well, graduates have become more risk-averse. They’re moving to the larger cities with more potential jobs.”These trends apply mostly to people graduating with a bachelor’s degree, Betz said. Those earning graduate or professional degrees aren’t as drawn as other grads to larger cities.Betz conducted the study with Mark Partridge, a professor of agricultural, environmental and development economics at Ohio State, and Belal Fallah of Palestine Polytechnic University.Their results are published online in the journal Papers in Regional Science and will appear in a future print edition.The findings have important implications for the many cities that try to attract more college graduates to live in their areas, Betz said.“Local policymakers often believe they can lure more college grads by becoming a hub of high-tech industry or creating a cool arts district,” Betz said.“That’s not what grads are looking for, at least since the downturn in the economy. They’re interested in moving somewhere that has a lot of job opportunities, and that generally means a larger city.”For their analysis, the researchers combined data from several publicly available datasets, along with industry-level employment data for 358 Metropolitan Statistical Areas, as defined by the U.S. Census Bureau.They compared migration patterns of college-educated workers from 1990 to 2000 with patterns from 2000 to 2010.Several studies examining the migration of college grads in the 1990s found that cities with initially larger shares of college grads were most successful in attracting more grads.“It seemed like a case of the rich getting richer,” Betz said. But this new study found that it was actually certain “smart” industries – ones that hired greater-than-average shares of college grads – that were attracting more grads to certain cities.“So new college grads weren’t necessarily attracted to these cities just because they had more college-educated residents like themselves – they were following these fast-growing industries.”All of that changed in the 2000s, though, after two recessions left a weak national economy. At that point, college graduates weren’t flocking to cities based on the types of industry or jobs available. They just wanted big cities with lots of potential jobs, Betz said.Betz said it is not surprising that many cities seek to market their areas as great places to live for new college graduates.“College-educated graduates are associated with many positive economic outcomes for cities, so leaders try to find ways to attract them,” he said.But these results suggest city leaders shouldn’t believe that bringing trendy high-tech industries to town or building arts and culture communities will necessarily help their cause.“These kinds of things may not hurt, but they’re not what college grads are mainly looking for in a place to live,” he said.Cities can’t do much to control their size – which was the main factor attracting grads in this study. But Betz said city leaders can work to create a stable and, if possible, growing labor market that shows grads they could find a good job if they move to their city. Share Share on Twitterlast_img read more

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Motorcar Parts Of America’s D&V Electronics Appoints Chief Technology Officer

first_img“Uday’s significant engineering experience complements D&V’s strategic focus on leveraging its world-class testing systems and capitalizing on the increasing global demand for electronic testing products and services, particularly within the automotive and aerospace markets,” said Selwyn Joffe, chairman, president and CEO. Motorcar Parts of America, Inc. recently announced its wholly owned subsidiary D&V Electronics, based in Toronto, Canada, has appointed Uday Deshpande, Ph.D., as chief technology officer, a newly created position.AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisement DeMoulpied comes to LSI from the Private Client Services practice of Ernst & Young where he managed strategy & operations improvement engagements for privately held client businesses. Some of his prior roles include VP of strategic development, director of strategic initiatives, and Lean Six Sigma Master Black Belt at OptumHealth, UnitedHealth Group’s health services business, as well as Lean Six Sigma Black Belt at General Electric, where he applied operations improvement principles to customer service, supply chain and product development. A successful entrepreneur, deMoulpied is also the founder of PrestoFresh, a Cleveland-based e-commerce food/grocery business.  DeMoulpied has a Bachelor of Science degree in Engineering Management from the United States Air Force Academy and a Master of Business Administration degree from the University of Dayton in Marketing and International Business. He served six years with the USAF overseeing the development of technology used on fighter aircraft and the E-3 Surveillance aircraft, finishing his career honorably as Captain. Deshpande, 51, most recently served as vice president, global vehicle electronics systems for CNH Industrial N.V. He previously served as senior director, global electrical systems engineering for Ingersoll Rand. Earlier in his career, he served as manager of power electronics, systems controls & software for General Atomics. His career experience also includes positions with Fisker Automotive, Maxwell Technologies, Black & Decker Inc. and Globe Motors. Uday earned a Bachelor of Technology degree from the Indian Institute of Technology; and, a Master of Science degree in electrical engineering and a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the University of Kentucky. He holds more than 10 patents (awarded or pending), and is a regular speaker at various forums on IoT and connected products. center_img With more than 20 years of experience across multiple industries and functional areas, deMoulpied has particular expertise in organizations with complex technical products. Combined, his prior positions have required a spectrum of skills in corporate strategy, operations improvement, product quality, and revenue cycle management. He has an impressive history of utilizing data driven problem solving (Lean Six Sigma) and project management (PMP and CSM) to achieve strategic goals surrounding customer satisfaction, operational efficiency and improved profit.  LSI President Brett Tennar says, “Steve’s success in developing operational strategies that improves the bottom line, builds teamwork, reduces waste and ensures quality product development and distribution checks many of the boxes of what we were looking for in a COO. This, coupled with his career in the Air Force working with highly technical systems and his in-depth understanding of Lean Six Sigma and Business Process Management sealed our offer. As our tagline states, our products are Powered by Science. This data driven approach is one reason why our company has grown exponentially as we employ the most advanced technology to product development. I am confident that Steve is the right person to drive operational strategy for our diverse and growing brands.” Advertisement “Uday has a solid background in leading innovation and implementing new technologies. These qualities are consistent with D&V’s legacy and our focus on being the leader in electrical powertrain testing systems and related applications,” said Bill Hardy, CEO of D&V Electronics.,Lubrication Specialties Inc. (LSI), manufacturer of Hot Shot’s Secret brand of performance additives and oils, recently announced the expansion of senior leadership. Steve deMoulpied joins LSI as the company’s chief operating officer (COO). AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisementlast_img read more

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DB Schenker Logistics accredited to Phase 2 of Cargo 2000’s quality management system

first_imgIn addition, it had to demonstrate its ability to create full transparency for the whole air cargo process from door-to-door and was constantly measuring processes and service quality, especially with regard to maintaining booked transit times.Dr Thomas C. Lieb (seen below), chairman of the Board of Management of Schenker AG and responsible for air and ocean freight, said: “DB Schenker is one of the founding members of Cargo 2000 and I am convinced that this initiative will further contribute to improved service quality. In the end, Cargo 2000 is our internal quality management system for DB Schenker air freight activities. It is the increase of process quality and improved transparency that our customers benefit from. We measure and verify provided transit times, help with proactive notification in case of unforeseen incidents and continuously increase process quality, which also contributes directly to higher productivity and efficiency.”The next stage for DB Schenker’s air freight is establishing the measuring for all lanes and stations, globally. Adds Dr Lieb: “We are already preparing for Phase 3, when it comes to creating transparency of all shipments at piece-level. Today and tomorrow’s supply chains need even more reliability and quality. A logistics provider committed to Cargo 2000 shows and underlines that it is committed to quality, and supports the customer with full door-to-door visibility.”Cargo 2000 is a group of 76 major airlines, freight forwarders, ground handlers, trucking companies and IT providers. Its members are implementing re-engineered air cargo transportation processes from shipper to consignee using Cargo’s 2000’s ‘Master Operating Plan’. This sits at the heart of an industry-wide process control and reporting system that drives data management and corrective action systems.Identified as a key pillar of IATA’s e-freight programme and with its membership at an all-time high, Cargo 2000 publishes the quality standards of its airline and forwarder members each month on its website.last_img read more

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News focus: Breaking protocol on client capture

first_imgFor tourists and school parties traipsing into the Supreme Court last week, it was barely interesting enough to keep them in their seats for more than 10 minutes.#*#*Show Fullscreen*#*# Gavin EdmondsonBut for solicitors and insurers, the arguments debated in the highest chamber could have huge consequences.By Supreme Court standards, Edmondson v Haven appears a mundane dispute: Edmondson initiated six claims for low-level RTA damages which Haven settled directly with the clients. This arrangement deprived the lawyers of around £12,500 in fixed costs that would have been due had the claims proceeded normally. But was it within the spirit – and, crucially, the legal obligations – of the pre-action protocol for these claims?The arguments heard in court demolished the relative harmony between insurers and solicitors that has prevailed since the protocol was conceived to bring down the costs of low-value claims. What Haven has done, Edmondson argued, is to undermine that entente cordiale at a time of high controversy over other civil litigation reforms. A rulebook painstakingly drafted over many months – and created in the public interest – has been overridden.‘The protocol was established after long and careful negotiation between a number of different stakeholders,’ Jonathan Crow QC, representing Edmondson, told the court.It is the aim of the protocol that the insurer pays fixed costs at pre-determined stages, he said. ‘Quite deliberately the insurer has avoided the quid pro quo of using the protocol. Haven has acknowledged the claim, got to know the name, contact details and nature of the injury and been given a good estimate of the offer – all by the information provided by the efforts of Gavin Edmondson Solicitors which has been lodged into the protocol.’The court heard that one draftsman, who helped to create the protocol in the first place, described Haven’s behaviour as ‘astonishing’ – though Crow said other insurers may have been involved in similar conduct.The 4 Stone Buildings QC said Haven had initially apologised to Edmondson when the claims were settled directly, but it quickly became apparent the insurer had ‘taken advantage’ of its adversary and ‘bucked the regime’ to meet its own ends.‘There was deliberate deception,’ Crow alleged. ‘Far from being a lapse, this was actually a policy of the insurer and they were encouraging their staff to make these approaches. They had an active policy of subverting the protocol.’Crow pointed out that Haven apparently stands alone in fighting this battle, with no intervention from the Association of British Insurers.By contrast, the Law Society was granted permission to intervene. Its written evidence broadly supported Edmondson’s arguments. The Society said the principle of equitable intervention where existing remedies are inadequate had to be extended to this case if the court wanted to maintain fairness. The future of many of its members may hinge on the Supreme Court backing Edmondson.The Society said the court ought to deploy the principle of equitable interference to protect the entitlement of the solicitor to receive these costs. Solicitors were entitled under the terms of the protocol to fixed fees from insurers, as there is no contractual liability applying to the clients, Chancery Lane said.‘There is constituted a tripartite arrangement which is binding between the client, the solicitor and the insurer,’ the submission stated. ‘If the insurer chooses to become an authorised user and a claim is properly made by a solicitor acting on behalf of a client then, if the insurer sends an electronic acknowledgement [to the CNF], it becomes liable to pay the stage one costs.’It added that solicitors now want guidance from the court as to whether and to what extent equitable interference can apply in a fixed costs regime in which the indemnity principle does not apply.‘The right of parties to settle disputes directly is a matter of individual freedom and the protocol should not be used as a tool for preventing private settlements’Yet insurers know this is a case worth fighting for. If Haven, which never admitted liability, can persuade judges they should be entitled to bypass solicitors and deprive them of their costs, it is potentially lucrative.Its arguments advanced in court were around contractual entitlement and public interest. On the latter point, Haven posed a simple question: where is the harm? Edmondson insisted – backed by independent research – that represented RTA victims stand to secure much greater compensation by sticking with their solicitors.But claimants are not generally in this process for the long haul; they have suffered and they want recompense as soon as possible. Were the six individuals at the heart of this case upset at their solicitors missing out on their costs? Haven would suggest not.Lord Marks QC, of 4 Pump Court, argued the Court of Appeal had placed the interests of solicitors above those of the public in ruling in favour of Edmondson.He said: ‘The right of parties to settle disputes directly is a matter of individual freedom and the protocol should not be used as a tool for preventing private settlements. All the evidence suggests the claimants were delighted to be able to settle their claims quickly.’He added that Edmondson failed to protect itself by working on a funding arrangement that did not prevent direct settlements, and included no provision for costs if settlements were made.Was Haven obliged to pay costs to Edmondson when the law firm’s involvement had effectively stopped after the issuing of a claims notification form? Could costs really be claimed for stages in the protocol that were never encountered?Marks insisted that solicitors had no entitlement or contractual provision to any costs and indeed that the aim of the protocol was not to ensure a solicitor can achieve a right to payment simply by issuing a claim notification form.Notification gave solicitors ‘no more than a contingent expectation’ of costs, he said, suggesting that the Court of Appeal had created a new jurisdiction where solicitors would be granted costs in the absence of any payments from their clients.Marks said the claims notification forms had given notice that Edmondson was instructed and working under a CFA, but crucially did not establish any right to costs. ‘Haven believed they were perfectly entitled not to pay the fees – they are not trying to cheat anyone,’ said Marks.While these arguments might not have kept the Supreme Court day-trippers enthralled, insurers and lawyers await its verdict with apprehension. Business models the length and breadth of the country hinge on the outcome.last_img read more

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New Version of NI AWR Design Environment Now Available

first_img New VSS RF block: DHYB_22 (ideal 2-input, 2-output, 180-degree coupler) Schematic editor speed up for loading large element projects New script to generate an MDIF file from S-parameter files APLAC multi-rate harmonic balance simulation technology for linear circuits Analyst support of dielectrics with relative permittivity/permeability > 0 but < 1 Analyst meshing improvements Numerous other use-model (ease-of-use and productivity enhancing) improvements You can download the complete release document for V11 here, to learn about additional features. NI (formerly AWR Corporation) has announced the immediate availability of the latest release of NI AWR Design Environment™ high-frequency software, inclusive of Microwave Office, Analog Office, Visual System Simulator™ (VSS), Analyst™ and AXIEM for the design of MMICs, RF PCBs, RFICs, microwave modules, communication systems, radar systems, antennas and more.This release (11.03/.04) has more than 100 improvements, enhancements and user interface changes are contained within this release.Some of the Highlights include:last_img read more

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