The future looks green for Ireland

first_imgDublin isn’t the only Irish site likely to benefit from a Brexit boostHowever, the consensus is that while there will be some relocations, it is unlikely to be the mass migration initially predicted.Fortunately, there is plenty of home-grown demand to satisfy – and outside Dublin, that is primarily what the players driving the redevelopment of docklands in Cork and Galway are targeting. Another location enjoying a new lease of life is Limerick, where fresh momentum has been injected into schemes mothballed in the financial crisis.In short, a few nerves will be jangling over the return of rents to 2007 levels, but a decade on, the market looks very different – and very much more robust. The Celtic Tiger appears to be roaring once more.Mia Hunt is Property Week’s market reports editor GDP grew by 26.3% last year, eclipsing the growth rates of emerging economic superpowers China and India and prompting the IMF to declare its recovery “exceptional”.The turnaround of Ireland’s economy is reflected in the improved fortunes of Dublin’s office market. Rents have risen from a low of €28/sq ft to €60/sq ft against a backdrop of pent-up demand and a dearth of space.Now, having slammed the brakes on development between 2007 and 2014, developers are poised to deliver some 7.3m sq ft of new office accommodation in the next two years. The question is: who is going to take it?There has been much talk about an exodus of firms from London to Dublin. On paper things look good – it’s an English-speaking country with a similar judicial system, low corporate tax and good air links – and local agents have reported a significant increase in enquiries since the referendum.last_img read more

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Oakland Facing More Backlog

first_imgCargo volume that has reached an all-time high at the Port of Oakland is fueling the big buildup of freight which has slowed cargo throughput.A labor dispute between waterfront employers and dockworkers is magnifying the slowdown, the port said.Ten-to-fifteen ships are anchored in San Francisco Bay daily awaiting berths at Oakland marine terminals. Some truckers report waits of several hours to pick up cargo.The condition is expected to persist until labor and management agree on a new contract, as explained by the port.A 20% surge in December loaded import containers at the port contributed to the record performance that was last set in 2006 with handled equivalent of 2.394 million 20-foot freight containers in 2014.Stronger U.S. demand for Asian manufactured goods along with cargo diversions from congested Southern California ports contributed to the cargo surge.A freight backlog at the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach has rerouted thousands of containers to Oakland. Last month Oakland handled 74,356 loaded import containers. That was the most since May 2014.The Port of Oakland said overall container volume – imports and exports – increased 2% in 2014. Import volume for the year increased 5.29%.last_img read more

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Wartsila wins contract to power semi-sub

first_imgZhejiang Share-ever Business Co., Ltd is a privately owned company with a fleet of more than 20 large vessels, including 72 m offshore platform supply ships, ocean cargo carriers of between 27,000 and 50,000 tonnes, and drag-suction dredgers.Zhejiang Share-ever Business Co., Ltd is a new customer to Wartsila. This vessel will operate in offshore waters around the world, and will be mainly used in loading and transporting large offshore equipment required by the offshore oil and gas industry.The vessel will be delivered in the end of 2011 and its engine configuration is based on the proven Wartsila 32 medium speed engines. The scope of supply includes three 9-cylinder in-line Wartsila 32 generating sets for a diesel electric installation, and three tunnel thrusters.”This kind of vessel has generated great interest amongst investors in the marine industry, and the market for it appears to be growing rapidly. Wartsila has been very successful in taking its share of related business opportunities, and we now have an excellent list of references to show our customers,” said Michael Zhou, business manager, special vessels, Wartsila in China.The 38,000 tonne self-propelled semi-submersible vessel has a total length of 195 and a maximum submersion depth of 23 m.last_img read more

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Gustav Seeland spins into Hamburg

first_imgJan Gaarz, planning manager at the Hamburg headquartered haulier, said this project was straightforward to execute – something of a rarity in Germany where infrastructure is ageing and over-dimensional cargo transport is becoming more difficult to execute. The entire journey was completed on roads specifically designed for heavy lift transport requirements. The route along which the 9 m propeller had to traverse was surveyed using Gustav Seeland’s 3D route-scanning vehicle. To ensure the cargo stayed stable during transit it was supported by struts, which also lowered the weight to be distributed across the 12-axle trailer.Olaf Beckedorf, Gustav Seeland managing director, added: “We do not really require such perfect conditions. Gustav Seeland is not a fair-weather operator. We undertake our own computer-based route reconnaissance, which generally ensures we know what conditions to expect almost anywhere.”  www.seeland-hamburg.delast_img read more

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March/April 2018 – now available!

first_imgThe March/April 2018 edition of HLPFI includes country reports on Russia, the USA and Italy. We also review the market prospects for the mining sector, analyse the latest developments with regard to escorts and permitting, as well as the challenges of yacht and boat shipping. This issue also includes HLPFI’s annual Project Cargo Africa supplement.  Click here to view the March/April 2018 digital edition.last_img

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LeO shelves bid to become compliant ADR entity

first_imgThe Office for Legal Complaints (OLC) has given up its attempt to become an alternative dispute resolution entity in compliance with the 2013 EU directive on consumer ADR.The decision, announced yesterday, means that client care letters will need to signpost another ‘ADR entity’ competent to handle complaints.In a statement, the OLC said it had decided that it will not proceed with its application based on changes to its scheme rules on which it consulted in September.Instead it will ‘explore whether there is an alternative approach to operating as an ADR entity, such as introducing a parallel scheme or offering new “alternative” dispute resolution services that better mitigate the risk and issues it has identified, and that have been raised by stakeholders’.The 2013 directive, intended to help the functioning of the EU internal market, has been transposed into UK law through regulations laid in March and June this year. Since 1 October it has required law firms to signpost consumers to an ‘ADR entity’ competent to handle any complaint.The Law Society updated its guidance on the subject in September. The OLC, which runs the legal ombudsman scheme, had intended to seek certification under the ADR directive. However in July this year it admitted that its complaints-handling scheme would require fundamental changes in order to comply.A consultation on the changes, which would extend time limits for accepting complaints and cut the number of grounds for dismissing them, ran from September to November. The ombudsman’s statement yesterday suggests that responses to the consultation were critical. The OLC’s chair Steve Green said the responses ‘have enabled us to give full and thorough consideration to how we should proceed’.Green said that ‘given that the organisation’s key priority at present is to improve the efficiency and quality of its statutory scheme, it is not the right time to take on the additional risks and operational changes that would arise from proceeding with the scheme rules changes as proposed’.He added that: ‘We are not giving up the ambition to become an ADR entity but we do want to explore alternative approaches to doing so. We will do this over the next six months.’last_img read more

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Leasing firm sells European arm

first_imgALLCO: Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi UFJ company BTMU Capital Corp has paid US$112m to acquire the European rail leasing business of Allco Finance Group, the companies announced on May 1.The London-based European arm of Australian asset leasing firm Allco has 12 Bombardier Traxx F140 AC locos on order which will be delivered to Dillen & Le Jeune by December 31, five EMD Class 66s to be delivered to UK operator Fastline Freight this month, and 10 Class 66s for Freightliner. Two Vossloh Euro 4000 locos are destined for use in Scandinavia. All are subject to long-term operating leases.’We believe that in the immediate term our efforts are more appropriately allocated to our US rail business that represents over 50% of our assets under management’, said Mark Worrall, Global Head of Rail for Sydney-based Allco. ‘We are delighted with the sale, which extends our relationship with Btmucc who provide funding for our US rail business and will employ our European rail team.’ CAPTION: Freightliner has ordered 10 EMD Class 66 locos to be financed by Allco. Three are already in service in Britain, with the remainder due in the next month.last_img read more

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Top Gear series 28 episode 5 recap

first_img Credit: BBC Credit: BBC Credit: BBC Credit: BBC Credit: BBC Credit: BBC Credit: BBC In the most recent episode of Top Gear hosts Freddie Flintoff, Paddy McGuinness and Chris Harris attempt to discover which is the best sports car you can currently buy. We also see Chris drive the new all-electric race car from VW plus YouTuber KSI is the guest on the sofa.The boys are tasked with each choosing a sports car in an attempt to decide which car is currently the best sports car you can buy. Predictably Chris turns up in a Porche 911, Freddie opts for an Astin Martin V8 Vanquish and Paddy, subtle as ever, chooses a bright red Ferrari Portofino. After a few minutes of slagging off each other’s cars, they set off for their first challenge.Credit: BBCTheir first challenge is to get as close as possible to their car’s advertised top speeds. This event takes place on a closed airfield where all sorts of other vehicles are also attempting feats of speed. Once they have all completed their 1.4-mile run it turns out that the Ferrari comes the closest clocking a speed of 188 mph.After testing their own cars they all choose another vehicle from the public who are at the event. Chris chooses a car, Freddie picks what he describes as a skateboard with a rocket on the back and Paddy finds himself in what can only be described as a shed. Not surprisingly Chris wipes the floor with the others but Freddie runs into an issue when his breaks fail. He ends up overshooting the end of the runway and flying onto the surrounding grass.The final part of the sports car challenge involves a race to a racetrack in an attempt to put in as many laps as possible before the clock runs down. They are not allowed to use sat nav to get there though and must rely on a co-driver using a map. Chris is paired with Damon Hill, Paddy with show favourite Sabine and Freddie ends up with the Stig who isn’t a great deal of help.Credit: BBCChris arrives first and puts in 20 laps, Freddie second and manages 17 laps whilst PAddy and Sabine get totally lost and only have enough time to put in five laps. Back in the studio, all three agree that the Porche is, in fact, the best sports car you can buy right now.Next up we see Chris Harris driving the insane all-electric VW IDR. The IDR has been made with the sole aim of going as fast as possible, it isn’t designed to take part in any particular competition and therefore isn’t bound by any rules. The result is astonishing and the IDR will go from 0-60mph in 2 seconds and 0-120mph in 5 seconds. It also corners like a beast too and you can see from the grimace on Chris’ face as he speeds around the track that the G forces are taking their toll on his body.Credit: BBCTo show just how fast the IDR is he pits it against a Mclaren 720S, one of the fastest supercars on the planet, and leaves it well in the rearview mirror in a drag race. The IDR is limited to a 12-mile range however so you don’t get much driving out of it. Nonetheless, the IDR is a stunning example of what can be achieved when there are no rules.Finally, we see Youtuber KSI taking his turn in the reasonably fast car. The weather conditions are terrible and not surprisingly he doesn’t put in the fastest of laps. He also takes part in a punch off with Freddie to see who can hit the hardest.Top Gear series 28 episode 6 will air on BBC 2 on 1st March at 8 pm on BBC2.View some more images from the episode in our gallery below: Credit: BBCcenter_img Credit: BBC Credit: BBC Credit: BBC Credit: BBC Credit: BBC Credit: BBC Credit: BBClast_img read more

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Police Scotland puts needs of public at heart of call handling

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to LinkedInLinkedInLinkedInPolice Scotland is introducing a new way of assessing calls to its 101 and 999 service to improve the way we respond to contact from the public.Frontline staff and police officers in our service centre and police offices are undergoing specialist training to make an enhanced assessment of threat, risk, harm and vulnerability for everyone who contacts the service.The information provided through this enhanced assessment will be used to determine the most appropriate and proportionate police response when we are contacted by a member of the public.These proposals follow extensive engagement with the Scottish Police Authority (SPA), elected members and other key stakeholders. Oversight and scrutiny of the implementation of CAM will be provided by the Scottish Police Authority (SPA) Governance and Assurance Group.Assistant Chief Constable John Hawkins, who has strategic responsibility for Contact, Command and Control said: “Every caller is different and our response should be too. The new approach will ensure we can provide better service to the public by taking more information from the caller so that we can make a more robust assessment of risk, threat and harm and vulnerability.“The new model will also increase our ability to despatch police officers to urgent incidents, which means we can get to the people who need us most, when they need us most.“Our current response to calls to the 101 and 999 service is based on pre-determined policies, procedures and system grading. Effectively it is a ‘computer says go’ approach to how we respond to calls. However, this does not mean it is the right response for every individual, and in some cases we have to send officers when the caller does not want us to do this.“Rather than having a ‘one size fits all’ approach to certain types of calls, under the new approach, service advisers will take into account the needs and circumstances of everyone who contacts us.“This means that we might deal with the same type of call differently depending on the needs of the caller, after assessing their vulnerability and the risk posed to them.“For example, we might send officers if an elderly person calls to report that their garden shed has been broken into, but someone who is in a less vulnerable situation may actually request that we set up an appointment at their convenience or that an officer calls them back.“When you contact Police Scotland, the first thing we will do is make sure you are safe. Our focus is, and always will be, to protect the public and the most vulnerable in our communities. That won’t change.”This new approach will be introduced in phases, starting with Lanarkshire, and Dumfries and Galloway in summer 2019, prior to a proposed roll out across Scotland.Scottish Police Authority Board member Mary Pitcaithly said: “A key part of the Authority’s responsibility is to ensure that there is the right investment and support for change in the way policing responds to the public when they need support and assistance.“With demands on the service changing rapidly, especially in addressing vulnerability, it is vital that policing adapts its approaches and forges new partnerships to improve the outcomes for people in need.“Of course, major changes also need to be well prepared for, well-managed, and well communicated and the approach being put in place for this initiative is designed to ensure we build on experience and strengthen both implementation and oversight.”The new method of assessing calls is the next step in the development of call handling services and was a recommendation made by HMICS in their 2015 Independent Assurance Review into Police Scotland call handling in which it recommended that Police Scotland adopt a more formalised risk and vulnerability assessment model for service advisors.last_img read more

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National Health Insurance Pilot Programme launched

first_img Share Share Sharing is caring! Share HealthLocalNews National Health Insurance Pilot Programme launched by: Dominica Vibes News – April 3, 2017center_img 479 Views   no discussions A National Health Insurance Pilot Programme (NHIP) has been officially launched, less than one year since it was mentioned by Prime Minister Roosevelt Skerrit in the 2016/2017 National Budget address.The pilot programme, launched at the Fort Young Hotel on Monday 3 April 2017 will operate through the Dominica Social Security in collaboration with the Ministry of Health. Minister for Health and Environment, Dr. Kenneth described this programme as a breakthrough and historic event saying “this is yet another manifestation of this government honoring its commitments to the people that it serves, and in this particular case, reforming the health sector of Dominica and taking it to the next level.”The provision of optimal health care services and access to these services by all, has always been a priority for this government, Dr Darroux continued saying that both developed and developing countries still continue to grapple with finding solutions to this issue. This pilot health insurance programme which was approved by Cabinet, will target single mothers resident or living permanently in Dominica, both nationals and non-nationals, under the age of thirty-five who are pregnant or have children three years or younger. The benefits include private sector services not available from or provided by the government, exclusive of those provided at the primary health care level, services not available locally where beneficiaries need to travel and is subject to referral from the relevant specialists within the government system and or approved by the medical services director. Referrals shall be restricted to a local medical consultant or the hospital medical director. Moreover, up to eighty percent (80%) on the invoices and bills shall be paid by the NHIP with the claimant being responsible for the remaining twenty percent (20%). In the event where the claimant does not have immediate access to funds for that twenty percent (20%) the amount will be given as a small loan with an arranged repayment schedule and in extreme cases, a government grant shall be provided based on the recommendation of the DSS. Those with private health insurance are advised to first claim from their insurances before trying to access this national health insurance. Dr. Darroux stated that payments from both DSS and the beneficiary are to be made directly to the medical facility or to the service provider.“So no one is going to have a cheque in their hand that they could use for other things, it has to be used to pay for the medical services which is sought,” he stated. Dr Darroux added that the NHIP is a health financing mechanism and a policy tool which the government hopes “aims to achieve the health policy goals of the government of the Commonwealth of Dominica and it is anticipated that this will serve a dual purpose for improving funding for health services and at the same time improving the quality and access to health care for mothers with children”. Not only will the NHIP generate additional resources for the health sector, but also guarantee that the targeted segment of the population has access to health services locally, support those affected in an organized way and engenders social solidarity and equity among the population. “It is the government’s plan to extend this coverage to the entire population using this pilot as a guide as well as ensuring consistency with international best practice,” Dr. Darroux said.“The need to provide some sort of health coverage also increases as we grapple with not only the rise in cost of health care services but with our mortality and morbidity rates,” Dr Darroux continued.He added that as a government they can only do so much to “alleviate the pain and suffering” and so encouraged that healthy lifestyles starts with individual decisions. A Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) was signed between the Ministry of Finance, Ministry of Health and Environment and the Dominica Social Security, while the cheque for EC five million dollars was also handed over to the Dominica Social Security during the launch.– / 9 Tweetlast_img read more

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