USAID Deputy Administrator Steinberg to lead Brattleboro’s World Learning

first_imgWorld Learning/SIT,World Learning announced today thatDonald Steinberg, deputy administrator for the US Agency for International Development and a former ambassador, will be the organization’s next president and CEO.”Donald Steinberg is a true leader in the field of international development. He brings invaluable experience, energy, enthusiasm and an impressive record of achievement to World Learning from his many years of public service,” said Rosamond Delori, chair of World Learning’s board of trustees. “We look forward to working with him to continue World Learning’s efforts to empower people and strengthen institutions around the world.”Steinberg will officially begin his role at the organization in early July and will use the interim period to develop a comprehensive understanding of the World Learning’s work, which spans more than 60 countries and includes participants from 140 countries annually.”It will be a great honor to work with the World Learning staff, board and alumni to continue its remarkable success in global development, international education and exchange, and graduate and professional education,” Steinberg said. “I am equally excited at the opportunity to partner with civil society institutions, the private sector, educational institutions and governments around the world to encourage inclusive development.”As deputy administrator at USAID, Steinberg’s areas of focus included the Middle East and Africa, women’s empowerment, organizational reforms under the USAID Forward initiative and enhancing dialogue with development partners. During his nearly 30 years with the government, he served as director of the State Department’s joint Policy Council, White House deputy press secretary, National Security Council senior director for African affairs, special Haiti coordinator, U.S. Ambassador to Angola and the president’s special representative for humanitarian demining. Steinberg was also deputy president for policy at the International Crisis Group and a Randolph Jennings senior fellow at the U.S. Institute of Peace.Steinberg has published more than 100 articles on foreign policy, African developments, gender issues, post-conflict reconstruction, children and armed conflict, and disarmament. He holds master’s degrees in journalism from Columbia University and political economy from the University of Toronto, and a bachelor’s degree from Reed College.His honors include the Presidential Meritorious Honor Award, the Frasure Award for International Peace, the Hunt Award for Women in Policy Formulation, the Pulitzer Traveling Fellowship, the State Department Distinguished Service Award and six State Department Superior Honor Awards.”From our very first meeting with him, it was immediately clear to us’staff and trustees’that Don’s dedication to and experience in making the world better for all its citizens was precisely aligned with World Learning’s 80 years of work around the globe,” Delori said.Steinberg will succeed Adam Weinberg, who announced in November that he would step down as World Learning’s president and CEO in June 2013 to become the president of Denison University in Ohio. World Learning selected Steinberg for the position after a five-month search led by former World Learning president and current Trustee Charles MacCormack, which involved trustees, staff, faculty and students. “I look forward to building on the proud legacy of Adam Weinberg and his predecessors and colleagues by helping empower a new generation of global leaders with the skills and values needed to build prosperous and democratic societies,” Steinberg said.He and Weinberg will work together closely over the next several months to ensure a smooth and timely transition.To download Steinberg’s full biography visit the World Learning website.World Learning is a nonprofit organization advancing leadership through education, exchange, and development programs in more than 60 countries.BRATTLEBORO, Vt., May 13, 2012 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — www.worldlearning.org(link is external)last_img read more

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McClaughry: Four proposals to improve elections

first_imgNow that the 2014 state elections are over, it’s worth looking at how the process might be improved in the future. Here are four proposals.Single Member Districts: The curse of legislative elections is that, in multimember districts, a candidate is only rarely willing to do battle with any other candidate. Why? Because there is always the prospect of winning some second votes from the partisans of that other candidate. This makes for appallingly issue-free elections.Elections should be occasions where incumbents defend their record, and challengers offer their alternative. When challengers fail to hold incumbents accountable, an important element of democracy is lost.Where single member districts might be awkward, as in Burlington, candidates should file and run for “Position 1”, “Position 2” etc. instead of at large. At present, there are three single member Senate districts (Lamoille, Orange, Grand Isle). There ought to be thirty, each composed of five House districts.One Big Choice: Vermont ballots are invariably cluttered up with scores of candidates  for six statewide offices. Voters ought to cast one vote for the leadership team of their choice: Governor and Lt. Governor. This is the current practice in 25 states. That would ensure continuity of policies if the governor died or resigned.The candidates would make up their own teams and contest party primaries with other teams, as in Maryland and Montana. Alternatively, the candidate who wins the primary for governor could ask his or her party convention to name the most suitable running mate to strengthen the ticket, as the national party conventions do in presidential elections.Under the One Big Choice plan, voters would concentrate on the character, experience, and platforms of the candidates for Governor, just as the voters in 2012 concentrated on Obama-Biden vs. Romney-Ryan. The parties would concentrate their campaign efforts, talents, volunteers and fund raising on persuading the voters to make the One Big Choice in their party’s favor.Treasurer and Secretary of State would be chosen on a nonpartisan basis by the legislature (as in New Hampshire and Maine). The Auditor of Accounts would be similarly chosen (as in 24 states.)The Attorney General would be the governor’s appointee, confirmed by the Senate (as in New Hampshire. New Jersey, Wyoming, Alaska and Hawaii.).  He or she would be accountable to the governor, instead of running his own independent public interest law firm at taxpayers’ expense.The four lower officers would be off the ballot and out of partisan politics. The scramble to raise money to fund their campaigns would end. Scarce campaign talent would migrate to the governor’s campaign and the Congressional and legislative campaigns. Ending the annoying clutter of competing advertisements, mailings, phone calls and yard signs from candidates about whom the public has little knowledge or interest would provide welcome relief to voters.The One Big Choice Plan is simple, understandable, tested, and far more meaningful than today’s welter of statewide candidates vying for attention from an electorate that really has little idea of who those candidates are or what those offices do. The downside: aspiring politicians hate it.Restore Party Integrity:  In 1974 Vermont threw elections open to anyone who wanted to vote anonymously in any party’s primary. This became an open invitation – enthusiastically accepted – for the Progressives, who rarely have a primary, to flock into the Democratic primary to back leftist Democrats. Similarly, but on a smaller scale, Libertarians, Tea Party people, and independents can flock into a Republican primary to nominate their favorites, with little regard for the need of the political party to be capable of governing when its candidates are put into power.Turkey Ballot: Finally, when the voters view all of the candidates for an office as turkeys (or worse), let them vote for “none of the above”.  If “none of the above” wins a plurality in a race, the office is declared vacant, there’s a special election, and the failed candidates can no longer qualify for the ballot (but could run as write-ins.)Even without this feature, just being outpolled by “none of the above” should produce a well-deserved embarrassment to the candidate who gets the next highest vote and assumes the office. The down side: the elected legislature won’t consider it because few of its members dare to take the risk of being outpolled by “none of the above.”John McClaughry, a former House and Senate member, is vice president of the Ethan Allen Institute (www.ethanallen.org(link is external))last_img read more

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VPR and the Vermont Foodbank join forces for Giving Tuesday

first_imgVermont Public Radio Tomorrow marks Giving Tuesday, a global day of giving that arose in response to Black Friday and Cyber Monday. This celebration of philanthropy taking place on Tuesday, November 28th, gives people an opportunity to turn their holiday spirit in the direction of their neighbors and support their communities. Once again this year, VPR and the Vermont Foodbank are teaming up to give Vermonters an opportunity to support two important causes with one gift.On Giving Tuesday, every gift to VPR will also provide 15 meals so that the Vermont Foodbank can help Vermonters facing hunger, thanks to two generous individuals from Shelburne and Burlington.“The Vermont Foodbank is proud to partner with VPR, another incredible organization that makes our community strong,” says Vermont Foodbank CEO, John Sayles. “Giving Tuesday provides Vermonters with the opportunity to give a gift that will make a real impact on our state in so many ways. With the help of our community this Giving Tuesday, we can ensure that when Vermonters facing hunger turn to us, we can meet them with the wholesome food they need to thrive.”Vermont Foodbank is the state’s largest hunger-relief organization, serving Vermont through a network of 215 food shelves, meal sites, schools, hospitals, and housing sites. Last year the Vermont Foodbank distributed nearly 12 million pounds of food to 153,100 Vermonters. “We are thrilled to collaborate with the Vermont Foodbank on Giving Tuesday for a third year,” says Brendan Kinney, VPR’s vice president for development and marketing. “We give voice to the issues of hunger and food insecurity through our news programming, of course, but as a statewide institution deeply rooted in the communities we serve, we feel a responsibility to do what we can to improve the quality of life in our region. We believe our audience shares our desire to support neighbors in need and will welcome the opportunity to support two essential Vermont nonprofits at once.”Learn more and donate at www.vpr.net(link is external) or by calling 800-639-6391.last_img read more

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UVM study confirms racial disparities in Vermont traffic stops

first_imgSource: UVM 03-27-2018 In response, the authors conducted a new analysis, “A Deeper Dive into Racial Disparities in Policing in Vermont,” just released, that uses more sophisticated statistical analysis to answer critiques about methodology and addresses data concerns. The new study confirms the earlier findings, said Stephanie Seguino, a professor of Economics at the University of Vermont and the lead author of both studies. It also contains analysis of new contraband data from the Vermont State Police suggesting that racial stereotypes about potential drug traffickers, at least as identified in traffic policing in the state, are inaccurate.“The goal of this work,” said Seguino, “is to provide a service both to law enforcement and the community on ways to use data to answer questions about the role of race in policing. Given its importance, we wanted to make sure our 2017 findings held, even with more sophisticated analytical techniques. The new study confirms the earlier conclusions.” Nancy Brooks, a visiting associate professor in the Department of City and Regional Planning at Cornell, was co-author of both studies.Context did not affect resultsA chief criticism of the earlier study was that it did not take into account the context of the traffic stops, Seguino said.“There was a legitimate concern that the stops and searches could have been prompted by other factors – age, time of day, gender, for example – rather than the race of the driver,” she said. “That was something we wanted to investigate.”  After controlling for the contextual factors, using a statistical technique called logistical regression analysis, the study came to virtually the same conclusions, Seguino said.Blacks were 2.7 to 3.9 times more likely to be stopped (depending on how many of the additional factors were used in the analysis) compared with 3.9 in the earlier study.Hispanics were 2.5 to 3 times more likely to be stopped compared with 2.9 times in the earlier study.“The more complex statistical analysis demonstrated that our original results hold,” Seguino said.The earlier study also found that Black and Hispanic drivers, though more likely to be stopped and searched, were less likely to be caught with contraband.After controlling for the other factors, the new analysis came to a similar conclusion: Blacks and Hispanics who were stopped and searched were about half as likely to be found with contraband compared to White drivers.“Adding controls for a variety of contextual factors had little effect not only on racial disparities in the probability of being searched but also of contraband being found during a search,” Seguino said. Black and Hispanic drivers: No hard drugs foundThe earlier study’s findings prompted the researchers to ask an additional question in the new study: How did the contraband that was found compare between Black and Brown drivers and their White counterparts? Publicly available information on traffic stops and searches indicates only that contraband was found without specifying its type. At the researchers’ request, the Vermont State Police provided this additional data for traffic stop searches in 2016.Marijuana was the contraband mostly commonly found, according to the new analysis – making up 71.5 percent of the total.Heroin, cocaine and opioids combined were found in 10 percent of all searches yielding contraband, but their racial distribution in traffic stops and searches was revealing.During 2016, these hard drugs were found only in the cars of White drivers with none found during searches of Black and Hispanic drivers.“With samples sizes so small,” (White drivers were stopped and searched by state police a total of 398 times, Blacks and Hispanics a total of 38 times) “we can’t make statistical inferences about this data,” Seguino said.  “But the data are at the very least illustrative, suggesting that the stereotype that searches of drivers of color are more likely to result in contraband of heroin, cocaine, and opioids than found on White drivers is inaccurate, at least for 2016 for Vermont State Police. More data would be helpful to see if this holds true for other agencies and over time.”Data flaws also examinedThe new study also addressed concerns that the 2017 paper’s conclusions may be unreliable because they were based on flawed and inconsistent data provided by the state police and municipal police departments.“Every data set in every study has flaws,” said Nancy Brooks, co-author and Visiting Associate Professor at Cornell University. “With that said, we did not find any evidence of serious miscoding or overt efforts to manipulate the data in the dataset law enforcement agencies provided.”The earlier study – which brought to light some inconsistencies in data gathering and coding – has had a positive impact on police departments statewide, spurring them to bring consistency to the collection and coding processes and to implement training on how to gather and record data accurately.“In sum,” Seguino said, “the use of more rigorous statistical techniques does not in any meaningful way change the nature of our 2017 study. They simply reinforce the racial differences we reported earlier.” University of Vermont,Stephanie Seguino, a professor of Economics at the University of Vermont. Researchers have conducted new analysis and confirmed their 2017 findings: that Black and Hispanic drivers in Vermont were more likely to be stopped and searched than White drivers, though they are less likely to be caught with contraband. (Photo: Ian Thomas Jansen-Lonnquist)University of Vermont A 2017 study showing that Black and Hispanic drivers in Vermont were more likely than White drivers to be stopped and searched by state and local police, and less likely to be found with contraband, was welcomed by many in the state’s law enforcement community for providing valuable feedback that could be put to good use in training programs. But questions were also raised about the study’s methodology and the reliability of its data. last_img read more

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Valley Real Estate Brokers Compete in Raising Money for Kids

first_imgThis winter, brokers from the local commercial real estate industry will unite and compete in raising money to help at risk children in Arizona. Brokers for Kids is a year-long fundraising effort, hosted by the Scottsdale 20/30, involving teams created by Valley commercial real estate market. The effort culminates with the Brokers for Kids annual event which will be held this year on Friday, February 15, 2013 at Tempe Beach Park at Tempe Town Lake.Throughout the year, brokers along with other industry professionals raise money through various fundraising efforts for Boys Hope Girls Hope. Boys Hope Girls Hope is non-profit that provides scholarships to underprivileged kids in both community-based and residency-based programs, ensuring a good education and a start towards a college education.“It’s truly an amazing charity that helps academically capable and motivated children in need to meet their full potential,” said Brokers for Kids Chariman Ben Hawkins. “We help these children succeed by providing value-centered family-like homes, better opportunities and education through college.”Last year, Brokers for Kids raised more than $242,000 for Boys Hope Girls Hope. Their goal is to raise $300,000 in 2013. A percentage of the fundraising dollars is also donated to the charity of choice of the Broker’s Cup winner.On February 15, the coveted Broker’s Cup is awarded to the top fundraising team. The teams will also participate in the Olympiad Championship, a fun day of games and spirited competitions at Tempe Town Lake. They will compete in a quarterback challenge, volleyball, basketball, baggo, and bocce games. Sponsorship opportunities are available for this day-long event.The Scottsdale 20-30 partnered with Valley Toyota Dealers and is raffling a 2013 vehicle to drive fundraising efforts leading up to the event. Raffle tickets are now on sale and the drawing for the Toyota will occur during the Olympiad on February 15 which is open to the public.“Every dollar counts and without the tremendous support of the commercial real estate community, this event would never have become what it is today,” said Hawkins.For more information on Brokers for Kids, the Scottsdale 20/30 organization, sponsorship opportunities or to purchase raffles tickets, visit www.scottsdale2030.org/brokersforkids.htmllast_img read more

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The future looks green for Ireland

first_imgDublin isn’t the only Irish site likely to benefit from a Brexit boostHowever, the consensus is that while there will be some relocations, it is unlikely to be the mass migration initially predicted.Fortunately, there is plenty of home-grown demand to satisfy – and outside Dublin, that is primarily what the players driving the redevelopment of docklands in Cork and Galway are targeting. Another location enjoying a new lease of life is Limerick, where fresh momentum has been injected into schemes mothballed in the financial crisis.In short, a few nerves will be jangling over the return of rents to 2007 levels, but a decade on, the market looks very different – and very much more robust. The Celtic Tiger appears to be roaring once more.Mia Hunt is Property Week’s market reports editor GDP grew by 26.3% last year, eclipsing the growth rates of emerging economic superpowers China and India and prompting the IMF to declare its recovery “exceptional”.The turnaround of Ireland’s economy is reflected in the improved fortunes of Dublin’s office market. Rents have risen from a low of €28/sq ft to €60/sq ft against a backdrop of pent-up demand and a dearth of space.Now, having slammed the brakes on development between 2007 and 2014, developers are poised to deliver some 7.3m sq ft of new office accommodation in the next two years. The question is: who is going to take it?There has been much talk about an exodus of firms from London to Dublin. On paper things look good – it’s an English-speaking country with a similar judicial system, low corporate tax and good air links – and local agents have reported a significant increase in enquiries since the referendum.last_img read more

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Oakland Facing More Backlog

first_imgCargo volume that has reached an all-time high at the Port of Oakland is fueling the big buildup of freight which has slowed cargo throughput.A labor dispute between waterfront employers and dockworkers is magnifying the slowdown, the port said.Ten-to-fifteen ships are anchored in San Francisco Bay daily awaiting berths at Oakland marine terminals. Some truckers report waits of several hours to pick up cargo.The condition is expected to persist until labor and management agree on a new contract, as explained by the port.A 20% surge in December loaded import containers at the port contributed to the record performance that was last set in 2006 with handled equivalent of 2.394 million 20-foot freight containers in 2014.Stronger U.S. demand for Asian manufactured goods along with cargo diversions from congested Southern California ports contributed to the cargo surge.A freight backlog at the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach has rerouted thousands of containers to Oakland. Last month Oakland handled 74,356 loaded import containers. That was the most since May 2014.The Port of Oakland said overall container volume – imports and exports – increased 2% in 2014. Import volume for the year increased 5.29%.last_img read more

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Wartsila wins contract to power semi-sub

first_imgZhejiang Share-ever Business Co., Ltd is a privately owned company with a fleet of more than 20 large vessels, including 72 m offshore platform supply ships, ocean cargo carriers of between 27,000 and 50,000 tonnes, and drag-suction dredgers.Zhejiang Share-ever Business Co., Ltd is a new customer to Wartsila. This vessel will operate in offshore waters around the world, and will be mainly used in loading and transporting large offshore equipment required by the offshore oil and gas industry.The vessel will be delivered in the end of 2011 and its engine configuration is based on the proven Wartsila 32 medium speed engines. The scope of supply includes three 9-cylinder in-line Wartsila 32 generating sets for a diesel electric installation, and three tunnel thrusters.”This kind of vessel has generated great interest amongst investors in the marine industry, and the market for it appears to be growing rapidly. Wartsila has been very successful in taking its share of related business opportunities, and we now have an excellent list of references to show our customers,” said Michael Zhou, business manager, special vessels, Wartsila in China.The 38,000 tonne self-propelled semi-submersible vessel has a total length of 195 and a maximum submersion depth of 23 m.last_img read more

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Gustav Seeland spins into Hamburg

first_imgJan Gaarz, planning manager at the Hamburg headquartered haulier, said this project was straightforward to execute – something of a rarity in Germany where infrastructure is ageing and over-dimensional cargo transport is becoming more difficult to execute. The entire journey was completed on roads specifically designed for heavy lift transport requirements. The route along which the 9 m propeller had to traverse was surveyed using Gustav Seeland’s 3D route-scanning vehicle. To ensure the cargo stayed stable during transit it was supported by struts, which also lowered the weight to be distributed across the 12-axle trailer.Olaf Beckedorf, Gustav Seeland managing director, added: “We do not really require such perfect conditions. Gustav Seeland is not a fair-weather operator. We undertake our own computer-based route reconnaissance, which generally ensures we know what conditions to expect almost anywhere.”  www.seeland-hamburg.delast_img read more

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March/April 2018 – now available!

first_imgThe March/April 2018 edition of HLPFI includes country reports on Russia, the USA and Italy. We also review the market prospects for the mining sector, analyse the latest developments with regard to escorts and permitting, as well as the challenges of yacht and boat shipping. This issue also includes HLPFI’s annual Project Cargo Africa supplement.  Click here to view the March/April 2018 digital edition.last_img

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