Malaria in pregnancy now complicated by drug resistance

first_imgMalaria is one of the most preventable causes of adverse pregnancy outcomes, but any gains made in the last decade at preventing the mosquito-borne illness in pregnancy may be lost as resistance to the prophylactic treatment sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine is rising. A new series in The Lancet Infectious Diseases takes stock of the current challenges facing women at risk of malaria infections in pregnancy.The past 10 years have seen a number of successes, the journal authors write, including lowered prevalence of Plasmodium vivax in Asia and Latin America and decreasing rates of Plasmodium falciparum in parts of Africa, but access to easy screening and testing is still lacking in resource-poor countries.Pregnant women, the authors suggest, are malaria’s sentinels because they frequent health clinics in low-resource countries. Malaria-endemic countries would do well to focus their resources on this group.”A deeper understanding of the biology of malaria infection in pregnancy will help to develop new approaches for the successful implementation of malaria elimination strategies to achieve a world free of malaria,” the authors write.Deficits in prevention, treatmentMalaria, along with poor nutrition, is one of the leading causes of low birthweight in many parts of the world, including sub-Saharan Africa. Moreover, malaria can interfere with placental development and function, leading to intrauterine growth restriction.One of the most cost-effective ways to limit malaria exposure is to ensure pregnant women sleep under an insecticide-treated net (ITN), but a study in 2014 showed that only 39% of pregnant women in sub-Saharan Africa used an ITN.Health officials also recommend in endemic countries that pregnant women be treated with intermittent preventive treatment in pregnancy (IPTp) of sulfadoxine–pyrimethamine. But in 2015, only 31.5% of eligible pregnant women received three or more doses of IPTp.Unfortunately, alternative IPTp candidates have not proved to be as effective as sulfadoxine–pyrimethamine, which is susceptible to resistance. Currently, only 7% of sub-Saharan pregnancies occur in places with substantial rates of antimalarial resistance, but that number is expected to grow, the authors said.Of five alternative IPTp candidates tested in the last decade, only dihydroartemisinin–piperaquine has shown promise in pregnant women. Confirmatory trials are ongoing to establish if the treatment is safe for newborns.One promising solution to close these treatment and prevention gaps is the identification of VAR2CSA, a malaria vaccine that offers protective immunity against P falciparum in pregnancy. The vaccine is currently in phase 1 trials. Young women, the authors write, would be ideal candidates for the vaccine.Monitoring drug effects in pregnancyArtemisinin-based combination treatments should be used to treat malaria in the second and third trimesters, the authors reported. In most trials, these treatments have a 85% to 90% success rate in pregnant women. Currently, the World Health Organization recommends the use of quinine with clindamycin for treating malaria in the first trimester, but it may soon be revising its recommendation to include artemisinin-based therapies.Continued pharmacovigilance of first-trimester exposure to antimalarial drugs is needed to further understand the risks of drug exposure, the authors said.See also:Jan 31 Lancet Infect Dis malaria burden studyJan 31 Lancet Infect Dis malaria prevention paperJan 31 Lancet Infect Dis malaria treatment reportlast_img read more

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OBITUARY: Arkansas Association Head, Bulldog Drummond, Dies

first_imgLong-time state association executive director and retired Bridgestone Americas sales executive Nelson Drummond passed away July 6. He was 69. AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisement The gregarious and gracious Drummond, known as Bulldog to friends and associates alike, had been executive director of the Arkansas Independent Tire Dealers Association, a post he held since late 1996. Drummond retired from Bridgestone in 1995 after a 34-year career with the tiremaker, where he served as manager of dealer sales in the northeast. He is survived by his wife, Marguerite; sons Dan and Eric; daughter Michelle Mayo; and five grandchildren, Services were held July 12 in Horseshoe Bend, Ark. (Courtesy of Tire Review/Akron),Lubrication Specialties Inc. (LSI), manufacturer of Hot Shot’s Secret brand of performance additives and oils, recently announced the expansion of senior leadership. Steve deMoulpied joins LSI as the company’s chief operating officer (COO). AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisement With more than 20 years of experience across multiple industries and functional areas, deMoulpied has particular expertise in organizations with complex technical products. Combined, his prior positions have required a spectrum of skills in corporate strategy, operations improvement, product quality, and revenue cycle management. He has an impressive history of utilizing data driven problem solving (Lean Six Sigma) and project management (PMP and CSM) to achieve strategic goals surrounding customer satisfaction, operational efficiency and improved profit.  DeMoulpied comes to LSI from the Private Client Services practice of Ernst & Young where he managed strategy & operations improvement engagements for privately held client businesses. Some of his prior roles include VP of strategic development, director of strategic initiatives, and Lean Six Sigma Master Black Belt at OptumHealth, UnitedHealth Group’s health services business, as well as Lean Six Sigma Black Belt at General Electric, where he applied operations improvement principles to customer service, supply chain and product development. A successful entrepreneur, deMoulpied is also the founder of PrestoFresh, a Cleveland-based e-commerce food/grocery business.  LSI President Brett Tennar says, “Steve’s success in developing operational strategies that improves the bottom line, builds teamwork, reduces waste and ensures quality product development and distribution checks many of the boxes of what we were looking for in a COO. This, coupled with his career in the Air Force working with highly technical systems and his in-depth understanding of Lean Six Sigma and Business Process Management sealed our offer. As our tagline states, our products are Powered by Science. This data driven approach is one reason why our company has grown exponentially as we employ the most advanced technology to product development. I am confident that Steve is the right person to drive operational strategy for our diverse and growing brands.” Advertisement DeMoulpied has a Bachelor of Science degree in Engineering Management from the United States Air Force Academy and a Master of Business Administration degree from the University of Dayton in Marketing and International Business. He served six years with the USAF overseeing the development of technology used on fighter aircraft and the E-3 Surveillance aircraft, finishing his career honorably as Captain.last_img read more

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U.S. Sen. Tom Udall Applauds Vice President Biden Selection Of Kamala Harris As Running Mate

first_imgSen. Kamala Harris From the Office of U.S. Sen. Tom Udall:WASHINGTON, D.C. — Today, U.S. Sen. Tom Udall (D-N.M.) issued the following statement applauding Vice President Joe Biden’s selection of Sen. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.) as his running mate: “Kamala Harris is an exceptional, exciting, and historic choice for the Democratic ticket, and she will be an outstanding Vice President and partner for Joe Biden in the White House. Having served alongside and worked closely with Senator Harris, I have seen firsthand the skill, dedication, integrity and intellect that she will bring both to the campaign trail and to governing during this time of crisis. “Senator Harris is well suited to make the case against Donald Trump and his administration’s disastrous incompetence — on coronavirus and beyond. The Biden-Harris ticket will generate immense enthusiasm in New Mexico, the West, and across the nation, and I am confident voters will be energized behind breaking another barrier and electing a black woman to the second highest office in the land. And as vice president, Senator Harris will be the kind of governing partner that every president needs — someone like Vice President Joe Biden was for President Obama — providing steady leadership and trusted counsel. “For her entire career, Senator Harris has fought for working people — the people that Donald Trump and Mike Pence have abandoned, failed, and left exposed to the terrible health and economic consequences of this pandemic. I’ve been proud to work with Senator Harris in the Senate on priorities like fighting climate change, safeguarding our public lands in the West, protecting and expanding health care, fighting for immigrant communities, standing up for Native Americans, and reforming our democracy.“And at this moment of reckoning for our nation, I have been honored to stand with her as she has worked to reform our criminal justice and policing system and move our nation toward racial and environmental justice. “I look forward to working as hard as I possibly can to ensure the Biden-Harris ticket wins New Mexico and wins this election, so that we can turn the page on the awful chapter of the Trump-Pence administration. And I am eager to partner with a President Biden and Vice President Harris to build back a stronger, healthier, more prosperous, more sustainable, and more just nation.”last_img read more

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WHL encouraged by Seychelles data

first_imgAustralian energy company WHL Energy Limited has received the initial “fast-track” data volume from the Junon 3D seismic survey acquired offshore the Seychelles by the Ophir Energy/WHL Energy JV in July 2014.This poststack migration volume is an intermediate product in the Pre-Stack Time Migration (PreSTM) processing of the 1,528 km 2 Junon 3D seismic survey.An initial review of the fast track data is encouraging in that the key prospects identified on the previous 2D seismic data can be interpreted on the fast track volume, and it is expected that the fully processed 3D seismic volume will provide detailed definition of the Junon area features, the company has explained.In a statement issued today WHL Energy said it was pleased that the fast track post-stack migration data generally shows encouraging seismic data quality although, as expected, the quality remains challenging in some areas due to the presence of shallow carbonate reefs. The fully processed PreSTM dataset is now expected to be delivered during November.Interpretation of the fast track volume is now underway with an initial interpretation expected to be completed during December following receipt of the fully processed PreSTM data.David Rowbottam, WHL Energy’s Managing Director, commented: “It is pleasing to see the progress with the investigation of the high potential Seychelles project continue utilising the latest technology available.”“While this initial seismic volume of the Junon 3D seismic data is very early stage with a lot of state-of-the-art processing and interpretation yet to be undertaken, it is encouraging that the key geological features noted in the earlier 2D seismic can be interpreted on the fast track 3D seismic volume.”“As with our VIC/P67 La Bella seismic, the real detail will not become apparent until we take delivery of the final Pre-Stack Time Migrated (PreSTM) processed dataset, which we now expect will be delivered in November. The follow-on PreSTM processed volume is expected to provide a significant uplift in data quality, as was experienced recently with the successful La Bella 3D seismic acquisition and evaluation.”The Junon 3D seismic survey is designed to mature a number of prospects for drilling on the Junon trend in the east of the Ophir Energy/ WHL Energy Seychelles acreage (Junon South, Junon East and Junon Central), an area high graded by WHL Energy’s geological studies.[mappress mapid=”225″]last_img read more

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Windnova Software Debuts at Gemini OWF

first_imgThe Gemini offshore wind farm has agreed a contract to become the first commercial users of Windnova, a new project management software, designed specifically for the offshore wind sector.The web-based software, developed by Windnova S.L, monitors and controls activities associated with the development and operation of offshore wind farms. The development team at Windnova claims its software saves time, improves quality and control, supports conflict resolution and reduces costs.Details of the three year contract, for an undisclosed value, were confirmed this week, as Gemini completed its first quarter using Windnova on what will be one of the world’s biggest wind farms.Mick Hoyle, Construction Manager, Gemini offshore wind farm, said: “Windnova is allowing us to have a high level of visibility and control across the different infrastructures in the Gemini Project. It helps us to create, manage and monitor all elements of QHSSE and Construction, allowing a full, reliable reporting process of the works.”Alvaro Fernandez, Managing Director, Windnova, said: “The Gemini project is the first commercial project achieving real benefits from Windnova’s QHSSE and Project Execution modules, allowing the Gemini team to track and record all activities in a very comprehensive way.”Certified to the ISO9001 Quality Management System, Windnova combines several modules and features for project execution and the operation and maintenance of offshore wind projects. The system can be customised, allowing each project to be personalised to meet the user’s requirements. Being cloud-based, Windnova does not require installation processes or hard drive space and is very easily updated, the developer highlighted.The system’s different modules allow users to connect easily to each other, controlling the volume and quality of communications and minimising the risk of data loss. The modules include a Project Register which tracks key information on contractors, vessels, personnel, ports and turbines.Live tracking of vessels and personnel is available on a real time basis. Safety, risk prevention and quality control are covered in a special module and a document control and reporting system allows comprehensive project reporting.Image: Windnovalast_img read more

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Heerema Joins BorWin3 Team

first_imgHeerema Fabrication Group (HFG) has been awarded a contract by Petrofac for the procurement and construction of the jacket and piles for the 900 MW BorWin3 HVDC platform. Petrofac, in a consortium with Siemens, has the full responsibility for the construction and offshore installation of the BorWin3 platform of TenneT, which will house a Siemens HVDC station that converts the alternating current produced by the wind turbines to direct current before transmitting it onshore to the German national grid.Petrofac will do the engineering and HFG from its Vlissingen facilities will undertake the fabrication of the HVDC substation jacket and piles.Heerema Marine Contractors (HMC) will transport and install the jacket in the North Sea at a water depth of up to 40 metres and approximately 100 kilometres off the German coast.Fabrication will start in the third quarter of 2016 and the sail away is scheduled for March 2018.last_img read more

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Family law

first_imgConflict of laws – Ancillary relief – Divorce – Foreign judgements Agbaje (respondent) v Akinnoye-Agbaje (FC) (appellant): SC (Lords Phillips (president), Rodger, Collins, Kerr, Lady Hale): 10 March 2010 Nigel Dyer QC, Eleanor Harris (instructed by Knox & Co) for the appellant; Timothy Scott QC, Peter Mitchell, Amber Sheridan (instructed by Tucker Turner Kingsley Wood & Co) for the respondent.center_img The appellant wife (W) appealed against a decision ([2009] EWCA Civ 1, [2009] 3 WLR 835) dismissing her claim for financial relief under part III of the Matrimonial and Family Proceedings Act 1984 following an overseas divorce from the respondent husband (H). H had been granted a divorce in Nigeria. The couple had been married for 38 years and had dual British and Nigerian nationality. Their children were born and, with the exception of the youngest child, educated in England. H and W had spent the majority of their married life in Nigeria, but had a house in England in which W was living when the divorce was granted. The Nigerian court awarded her a life interest in a property the couple owned in Nigeria and a lump sum equivalent to £21,000. W later obtained leave to apply for financial relief under part III of the 1984 act. The High Court ordered that W should receive a lump sum equal to 65% of the proceeds of the sale of the English property. The award represented 39% of the couple’s total assets. H appealed. The Court of Appeal allowed his appeal on the basis that the judge had not: (i) expressly addressed the factors in sections 16(2)(d), 16(2)(e) and 16(2)(f) when considering whether the order should be made; (ii) given sufficient weight to the parties’ connection with Nigeria; (iii) addressed the need for respect and deference to be paid to the Nigerian court. The Supreme Court had to determine: (i) to what issue the matters listed in section 16(2) were directed; (ii) what role forum non conveniens principles or comity had to play in the exercise of the discretion under section 16; (iii) whether an applicant had to show exceptional circumstances, hardship or serious injustice before an order could be made; (iv) whether the court was limited to making an award of the ‘minimum extent necessary to remedy the injustice’; (v) what matters the court should have regard to, and in what way, when exercising its powers under section 17. Held: (1) The factors in section 16(2) were not relevant when considering whether to make an order under section 17; they were matters to which regard must be had in considering whether ‘it would be appropriate for such an order to be made by a court in England and Wales’ under section 16(1). (2) Section 16 did not impose a statutory forum non conveniens test. The whole basis of part III was that it might be appropriate for two jurisdictions to be involved, one for the divorce and one for ancillary relief. The factors in section 16(2) were directed to the question of whether it would be appropriate for an order to be made by an English court when there had already been proceedings in a foreign country, including proceedings in which financial provision had been made. However, section 16 did reflect the principles of comity as between competent courts, Holmes v Holmes [1989] Fam 47 CA (Civ Div) considered. (3) Part III contained no express reference to hardship, injustice or exceptionality. Although both hardship and injustice were relevant factors for the court to consider under sections 16 and 18, they were not preconditions, Jordan v Jordan [2000] 1 WLR 210 CA (Civ Div) applied. (4) There was no statutory basis for the principle that the English court was limited to making an order that represented the minimum necessary to remedy the injustice. However, it was not the intention of the legislation to allow a ‘top-up’ of the foreign award so as to equate with an English award. Only in cases where there was a strong English connection was it appropriate to ask what provision would have been made had the divorce been granted in England. (5) Part III had to be applied in light of the legislative purpose, namely the alleviation of the adverse consequences of no, or inadequate, financial provision being made by a foreign court in a situation where there were substantial connections with England. The amount of financial provision awarded under section 17 would depend on all the circumstances of the case and the following general principles. First, primary consideration had to be given to the welfare of any children of the marriage. Second, it was never appropriate to make an order which gave the claimant more than she or he would have been awarded had all proceedings taken place in England and Wales. Third, where possible the order should have the result that provision was made for the reasonable needs of each spouse. The reasons why it was appropriate for an order to be made in England were among the circumstances to be taken into account in deciding what order should be made. Where the English connections of the case were very strong, there might be no reason why the application should not be treated as if it were made in purely English proceedings; however, the full procedure for granting ancillary relief after an English divorce would not apply. (6) The English connections in the instant case were substantial and the judge plainly took the relevant matters in section 16(2) into account. There was a very large disparity between what H and W received in Nigeria such as to create real hardship and a serious injustice. The Court of Appeal had no basis to interfere with the exercise of discretion and the order of the High Court judge was restored. Appeal allowed. last_img read more

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Legal aid payment regime blamed for RMJ collapse

first_img See Comment and Letters Legal aid lawyers should brace themselves following chancellor George Osborne’s emergency budget, as the Ministry of Justice confirmed it is looking at cuts in legal aid eligibility and fees. A spokesman said the department will be taking a ‘fundamental’ look at the legal aid system ‘to innovate and provide value for money’. The Law Society has hit back at government claims that inefficiencies at legal advice charity Refugee and Migrant Justice (RMJ) led to its collapse – while third sector groups have warned that all legal aid suppliers are facing funding difficulties. The charity, which was one of the largest providers of immigration and asylum advice, went into administration last week. It blamed cashflow problems caused by the Legal Services Commission’s payment regime, under which firms are not paid until a case closes. Law Society chief executive Desmond Hudson said the payment structure was ‘at its lowest a major contributing factor in the collapse of RMJ’. He described as ‘inaccurate’ the government’s claim that all other organisations had coped with the payment regime, saying cashflow problems had contributed to the closure of Gateshead and Cambridge law centres and that private practice firms were also ‘suffering’. Hudson said the LSC and former legal aid minister Lord Bach last year accepted that billing arrangements for immigration work were inadequate. AdviceUK, a support network for advice centres, wrote to justice secretary Kenneth Clarke this week, warning that RMJ is ‘far from alone in experiencing cashflow problems’ as a result of the legal aid payment structure. Chief executive Steve Johnson wrote: ‘Every legal aid supplier I know of has a cashflow problem because they cannot now collect payment for legal aid work until the case is closed.’ He said the problems were down to the ‘serial maladministration’ of civil legal aid by the LSC, which had pressed ahead with ‘poorly conceived reforms’ that have increased bureaucracy and costs, and driven down quality. Julie Bishop, director of the Law Centres Federation, said law centres struggled for three years to cope with the fee regime introduced in 2007, and were now on an even keel. But she said that stability had come at a price, with centres on average using 70% of their reserves to survive.‘Were they to face another financial hit there would be meltdown,’ said Bishop. last_img read more

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Book review: Architect’s Legal Pocket Book

first_imgPractically every architect in the land will have at some point referred to The Architect’s Legal Handbook. The widely used reference manual, first published by the Architectural Press in 1973, has become the default legal textbook for architectural students and practitioners alike. In 1997 Charlotte Baden-Powell’s bite-size Architect’s Pocket Book provided a wealth of architecturally-relevant data in accessible, bullet-point-style format. And now practising London architect Matthew Cousins has deftly combined the two concepts with his recently published Architect’s Legal Pocket Book. The book describes itself as “the definitive pocket reference guide on legal issues for architects and architectural students.” Clearly it is an ambitious work, not only covering the labyrinthine tentacles of the English legal system but extracting information salient to architects and then packaging it in a handy, accessible format. Accordingly, it is conveniently split into ten sections dealing comprehensively with matters ranging from planning law to contract administration. There is also a detailed index, extensive glossary and chronological lists of relevant legal precedent cases and statutes which in themselves make fascinating reading.The book deals with highly complex matters with masterful clarity and precision. This is not an epic academic tome designed to be pored over from cover to cover, it is a concise reference manual to be dipped into as and when necessary as an invaluable source of practical information. Crucially, it does not interpret the law; it relays it objectively and anticipates its impact on the building and procurement process.A key element of the book’s effectiveness is its simple design. This is a naturally text-heavy paperback but it is relieved by bold headings, flow-charts, diagrams and tables, all of which strengthen its claims to accessibility. Its pocket-size measurements also make it handy and compact and its graphic design format neatly identifies it as part of the same series as Baden-Powell’s earlier work.Why the need for the Architects Pocket Book when the revered Architect’s Legal Handbook is already standard issue throughout the industry? Two important reasons. One, this book is a far more accessible size and format providing key nuggets of summarised information rather than extended subject related essays. And crucially, the Architects Pocket Book has been written by an architect rather than a barrister. This enables the legal subject-matter to be filtered through a highly specialised, uniquely architectural perspective, a rare asset indeed. The result is an in-depth and invaluable legal repository specifically customised for architects.Architect’s Legal Pocket Book achieves what is very nearly impossible: it humanises the law. The law is an intimidating beast, no less so when configured to the equally complex and routinely truculent machinations of architectural practice. But by adopting a highly effective combination of forensic detail and lucid presentation, Cousins is able to make sense of highly complex subjects and convey their meaning in a simplified way that should be easily accessible to all within the industry. Watch this space, this handy and indispensible guide could well usurp its coveted predecessors and emerge as the essential guide for the next generation of architects and students. Architects Legal Pocket Book is published by the Architectural Presslast_img read more

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What went into building London’s Nightingale Hospital

first_imgSUBSCRIBE to access this story SUBSCRIBE for UNLIMITED access to news and premium contentA subscription will provide access to the latest industry news, expert analysis & comment from industry leaders,  data and research – including our popular annual league tables. You will receive:Print/digital issues delivered to your door/inboxUnlimited access to building.co.uk including our archivePrint/digital supplementsNewsletters – unlimited access to the stories behind the headlinesSubscribe now  Get access to premium content subscribe todaylast_img read more

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