Interbike 2009 – New Chris King Swift Road Racing Hubs, Inset Headset and Tools

first_imgRear in Orange showing radial lacing on non-drive side.Green shown with full radial lacing on front (above) and radial non-drive on rear (below).Not shown, they also have a new 15mm ISo Front Disc Brake mountain bike hub that’s compatible with 15QR suspension forks.  It’s available in two models, an SD hubshell and an LD hubshell that’s based on a 20mm axle.  There are also retrofit kits to convert your existing King hubs into 15mm axle hubs.  They have adustable bearing preload without removing the hub from the fork, too.  $179 MSRP, available in 28/32/36 hole drillings. 5-Year warranty.The new Chris King InSet sealed bearing low stack NoThreadSet is designed to with with the newer mountain bikes that have inset headsets.  They’re available now and come in three versions: 1-1/8″ (120g – $129), Tapered (170g – $149) and Mixed Tapered (150g – $149).  The Mixed Tapered uses an inset upper and standard outboard bottom section.  They use aluminum cups and bearing cap with stainless steel bearings and are available in all the King colors (some colors not available until end of year).  10 year warranty as with all King headsets.Chris King has also launched a new line of Ream and Face tools for Inset Sealed Bearing Headsets.  They’re available in a range of sizes to fit different size ranges of head tubes and configurations.  They come in Small Diameter and Large Diameter kits, and the latter requires parts from the former to function properly.  Available to the Trade only, not intended for (or for sale to) consumers.  Yeah, we know, that just makes you want them even more, but seriously, how often would you use these? They are designed to use a soy-based cutting lube that’s exclusively theirs. Last but not least, they’ve created a SRAM specific bottom bracket (118g vs 106 for Shimano version).  In reality, it’s the same bottom bracket, except it has a self-expanding spacer (that bronze bit between the red bearing cup and the inside of the crank in the photo above) and a sleeve that fits over SRAM’s tapered axle on the non-drive side.  The bearings and cups themselves are the same as the Shimano compatible bottom brackets.  They come with a 5-year warranty and cost $129.  They’re available in both 68mm and 73mm versions. Front (above) and rear (below) in Red.center_img INTERBIKE 2009 - Chris King is showing off their new Swift road hubs, an ultralight set of racing hubs that come in around 320g per pair!It’s a completely new hub with different internals than their classic road hubs, and they’re the first King hubs that are made to allow radial lacing.    They have low spoke count options, including 20/24/28/32 hole (front) and 24/28/32 hole (rear) drillings.  The hubs are sold separately and weights and pricing are:Front: 105g – $149Rear: 215g – $349A big part of the weight savings comes from the new Titanium Ring Drive internals.  The all-new drive mechanism uses 45 teeth rather than King’s standard 72 tooth configuration.  Despite being Ti, they still come with a 5-year warranty.They’re available in all of Chris King’s colors: Black, Silver, Navy, Red, Green, Mango, Pink, Pewter, Gold and Brown.  We asked why they didn’t have white and the answer was because you can’t anodize white, it has to be painted…but they acknowledged that it would be awesome.  They’re made in standard road widths, 100mm front and 130mm rear with 17mm diameter aluminum axles for use with normal QR skewers.  Freehub is 8/9/10 speed compatible with Shimano and SRAM cassettes.  Lastly, they use low-friction bearing seals.Hit ‘more’ for lots of photos and to see their new Inset Low-Stack Headset and some new frame prep tools…last_img read more

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QMotion Shows New QIS Power and Comm Panel

first_imgLegrand | AV Residential Solutions has updated its QMotion Qadvanced Intelligence System (QIS) Power and Communication Panel, the control system for its QIS Hardwired Shades.The QIS Power and Communication Panel comes with its own power supply and delivers power to wired wall-mounted switches. The updated system measures 6.9 inches by 4.4 inches by 1.7 inches — shorter and slimmer, designed to fit in a Vantage Controls enclosure.Each QIS Power and Communication Panel is designed to distribute the appropriate power to as many as eight shades or control devices. It comes with eight RJ-45 ports for motorized shades and switches and two RJ-45 communication ports. The panel also provides protection against a short circuit or overload to individual shades.The updated QIS Power and Communication Panel is available now. Here are the details.last_img read more

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Paleo diet: Humans needed carbs for bigger brains

first_imgShare Share on Facebook LinkedIn Pinterest Hardy’s team highlights the following observations to build a case for dietary carbohydrate being essential for the evolution of modern big-brained humans:(1) The human brain uses up to 25% of the body’s energy budget and up to 60% of blood glucose. While synthesis of glucose from other sources is possible, it is not the most efficient way, and these high glucose demands are unlikely to have been met on a low carbohydrate diet;(2) Human pregnancy and lactation place additional demands on the body’s glucose budget and low maternal blood glucose levels compromise the health of both the mother and her offspring;(3) Starches would have been readily available to ancestral human populations in the form of tubers, as well as in seeds and some fruits and nuts;(4) While raw starches are often only poorly digested in humans, when cooked they lose their crystalline structure and become far more easily digested;(5) Salivary amylase genes are usually present in many copies (average ~6) in humans, but in only 2 copies in other primates. This increases the amount of salivary amylase produced and so increases the ability to digest starch. The exact date when salivary amylase genes multiplied remains uncertain, but genetic evidence suggests it was at some point in the last 1 million years.Hardy proposes that after cooking became widespread, the co-evolution of cooking and higher copy number of the salivary amylase (and possibly pancreatic amylase) genes increased the availability of pre-formed dietary glucose to the brain and fetus, which in turn, permitted the acceleration in brain size increase which occurred from around 800,000 years ago onwards.Eating meat may have kick-started the evolution of bigger brains, but cooked starchy foods together with more salivary amylase genes made us smarter still.center_img Understanding how and why we evolved such large brains is one of the most puzzling issues in the study of human evolution. It is widely accepted that brain size increase is partly linked to changes in diet over the last 3 million years, and increases in meat consumption and the development of cooking have received particular attention from the scientific community.In a new study published in The Quarterly Review of Biology, Dr. Karen Hardy and her team bring together archaeological, anthropological, genetic, physiological and anatomical data to argue that carbohydrate consumption, particularly in the form of starch, was critical for the accelerated expansion of the human brain over the last million years, and coevolved both with copy number variation of the salivary amylase genes and controlled fire use for cooking.With global increase in obesity and diet-related metabolic diseases, interest has intensified in ancestral or ‘Palaeolithic’ diets, not least because – to a first order of approximation – human physiology should be optimized for the nutritional profiles we have experienced during our evolution. Up until now, there has been a heavy focus on the role of animal protein and cooking in the development of the human brain over the last 2 million years, and the importance of carbohydrate, particular in form of starch-rich plant foods, has been largely overlooked. Email Share on Twitterlast_img read more

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Flu Scan for Jan 27, 2014

first_imgChina confirms second H10N8 avian flu caseA second case of H10N8 avian flu has been confirmed in the same province as the world’s first case, which was reported last month, Chinese health officials told Xinhua, the nation’s state-run newspaper.A 55-year-old woman was admitted to a hospital in Nanchang, the capital of Jiangxi province, on Jan 15, the story said. She had a sore throat and dizziness, according to the provincial health department. She had visited an agricultural market.China’s Centers for Disease Control and Prevention cautioned travelers to China to avoid contact with fowl after the case was confirmed, the Taipei Times reported today. The agency also issued a second-level travel alert for Jiangxi, Guangdong, Zhejiang, Jiangsu, Hunan, and Fujian provinces and for the cities of Shanghai and Beijing. The rest of the country is under “watch” status, the story said.The world’s first H10N8 case, which proved fatal, was confirmed on Dec 17. It involved a 73-year-old woman with a compromised immune system.The Taipei Times story notes that the virus is considered a low-pathogenic agent in birds and has been detected in samples from migratory birds and poultry in Japan, South Korea, the United States, Italy, and Sweden in addition to China.Jan 27 Xinhua story Jan 27 Taipei Times article Dec 17, 2013, CIDRAP News story on first case Spreading H5N8 Korean outbreak leads to lockdown on 3 farmsSouth Korean officials today imposed a 12-hour lockdown on poultry farms in three provinces that bans farmers and farm-related workers, including veterinarians, from traveling to and from farms, according to an Agence France-Presse (AFP) story.The action is geared to stopping H5N8 outbreaks that have now affected 18 farms in a widening crisis, up from 8 farms late last week. Provinces affected by the lockdown are South and North Chungcheong and Gyeonggi, which surrounds Seoul. The first eight H5N8 outbreaks were in North Jeolla province.More than 640,000 poultry have been culled to prevent disease spread, with another 810,000 slated for slaughter, AFP reported. In addition to the 18 affected farms, workers are testing birds on 22 other farms.Jan 27 AFP reportIn related news, Seoul-based Yonhap News Agency reported on Jan 25 that H5N8 has been isolated from a Korean chicken for the first time in the outbreak; the other poultry infections were in ducks. The chicken was in South Chungcheong province.In addition, officials in Gyeonggi province said feces recovered from a lake near the province’s west coast tested positive for avian flu, but the specific strain has not yet been identified.Jan 25 Yonhap article Study: working-age adults more susceptible to severe fluWorking-age adults who have diabetes are more susceptible to severe flu infections, according to a study from University of Alberta researchers who published their findings in Diabetologia. The group’s goal was to compare flu levels in adults with and without the disease to help fill in knowledge gaps that underlie vaccination recommendations.The team cohort study used data from Manitoba, Canada, from 2000 to 2008. All working-age adults were identified and paired with two nondiabetic controls.Researchers looked at clinic visits, hospitalizations for pneumonia and flu, and all-cause hospitalization. Their analysis included 745,777 person-years of follow-up among 166,715 subjects. Those who had diabetes were more likely to be vaccinated against flu.People with diabetes had a 6% (relative risk 1.06, 95% confidence interval 1.02 to 1.10; absolute risk difference 6 per 1,000 adults per year) greater increase in all-cause hospitalization linked to flu. However, researchers found no difference between the groups in the rates of flulike illness or pneumonia and influenza.They concluded that the evidence is the strongest yet for targeting patients with diabetes for flu vaccination.Jan 24 Diabetologia studylast_img read more

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Stewardship / Resistance Scan for Mar 29, 2017

first_imgGerman GP antibiotic prescribing for respiratory illness found wantingGerman general practitioners (GPs) follow national guidance on prescribing antibiotics for acute lower respiratory infections only about a quarter of the time, according to a study yesterday in PLoS One.Researchers analyzed data from 2009 to 2013 from electronic health records of 12,880 patients. GPs prescribed antibiotics in 41% of consultations.GPs’ decision on whether or not to prescribe an antibiotic meshed with national guidelines 52% of the time, and agreement with the guidelines on antibiotic choice occurred 51% of the time. “Hence,” the authors write, “a congruent prescribing decision and a prescription of recommendation was found in only 25% of antibiotic prescriptions.”Further, about 73% of antibiotics prescribed for cough and 78% for acute bronchitis were incongruent to the guidelines. In contrast, only about 28% of antibiotics prescribed for community acquired pneumonia did not match national recommendations.”Our results show that there is a big gap between guideline recommendation and actual prescribing, in the decision to prescribe and the choice of antibiotic agent,” the authors conclude. “This gap could be closed by periodic quality circles on antibiotic prescribing for GPs.”Mar 28 PLoS One study Manure from cattle given antibiotics alters soil microbiome, study findsManure from cattle that were administered antibiotics can dramatically raise antibiotic-resistance levels and alter the bacterial and fungal makeup of the surrounding soil, according to a study today in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B.A team led by Virginia Tech researchers analyzed soil samples from 11 US dairy farms. They measured the prevalence of four antibiotic-resistant genes in soil samples near manure piles and not near them. The difference for two of the resistance genes was not significant. But for ampC (related to beta-lactam resistance) and tetO and tetW (related to tetracycline resistance), the rates were 421% and 3,283% higher, respectively, in the manure-exposed soils.The authors wrote, “This was potentially expected for ampC, given the treatment of cattle with cephapirin benzathine, but not for tetO, given that farm managers did not report any recent use of tetracyclines.”The investigators also discovered that bacterial community composition at manure-exposed sites was dominated by Acinetobacter bacteria, known for their resistance to cephalosporins. Fungal composition was also altered in manure-exposed soil. In addition, microbes with greater antibiotic-resistance showed higher stress levels.”The development of antibiotic resistance can be an energy-sucker for a microorganism, and would explain why we’ve seen higher stress levels. We need to continue to investigate this possible link,” said lead author Michael Strickland, PhD, in a Virginia Tech news release.Mar 29 Proc R Soc B study Mar 28 Virginia Tech news release Study finds accurate food safety advice sorely lacking in cookbooksTwo common disinfectants effectively combat biofilm-producing methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), researchers reported yesterday in Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control.The organization of bacteria into biofilms is a common mode of pathogen survival, since it increases their ability to withstand antibiotics, disinfectants, and hosts’ immune response. Biofilm formation is being increasingly recognized as an infection control problem, and it can lead to increased drug resistance and treatment failure.German researchers tested the ability of the disinfectants octenidine, chlorhexidine, polyhexanid, and chloroxylenol to combat MRSA biofilms in the lab.They found that octenidine and chlorhexidine performed well, inhibiting MRSA in biofilms with reduction rates of 94 ± 1% and 91 ± 1%, respectively, while polyhexanid had a maximum efficacy of only 81 ± 7%. Chloroxylenol was not effective, with an efficacy of 15.8 ± 27%. The researchers also found that the topical decolonization agent mupirocin was not effective.Mar 28 Antimicrob Resist Infect Control studylast_img read more

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Los Alamos Little Theatre Presents ‘Glitter Girls’ March 6-21

first_imgMembers of the show, ‘The Glitter Girls’, written by Mark Dunn and directed by Kathi Collins gather on set prior to rehearsal. The Los Alamos Little Theatre production runs March 6-21 at the Performing Arts Center, 1670 Nectar S. Pictured bottom row from left, Kathi Collins (director), Valerie Lawdensky, Gwen Lewis, Alexander Nunn and Michael Adkins and top row from left, Jonelle Duval, Jeanne Adkins, Andee Baker, Julia Mundt, Terry Berry (assistant director), Pat Beck and John Gustafson. Visit www.lalt.org for more information. Photo by Rich Hassman/LALTlast_img read more

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Daily Postcard: Robin Spotted Singing In White Rock

first_imgDaily Postcard: A robin spotted Sunday singing in a tree in White Rock. Is the robin the first sign of spring? The old tale is that a robin is the first sign of spring. As the myth goes, all robins migrate south for the winter to avoid the cold, returning in the early spring. However, American Robins are adaptable birds, comfortable in all sorts of habitats across North America. American Robins can be found around the United States all winter long. Robins not making a trip south will typically hide in forests and other wooded areas as protection from the elements, searching for food when the ground is less frozen. If you’re looking for a bird to help forecast the weather, the Red-winged Blackbird is a more reliable predictor. They routinely fly north the first few weeks of March, just in time for spring. Source: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. Photo by Nancy Ann Hibbslast_img read more

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Shell, Honda and Toyota to bring seven H2 stations to California

first_imgGet instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270. Subscribelast_img

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Is the pope right to speak out about the Equality Bill?

first_imgYou have to hand it to the Equality Bill – its detractors come from every walk of life. At one end of the spectrum there’s the white working class British guy who thinks the bill is all about giving his job to women or black people. It’s typical of this benighted government, he rages, and nothing, but nothing will persuade him to vote ‘Nu-Labour’ again! And at the other end of the spectrum there’s a German guy, living in some splendour in Italy, who also dislikes our home-grown British bill and who also isn’t about to engage in reasoned debate – because, God knows, he’s never wrong. He’s Pope Benedict XVI and, like his predecessors since the sixth century, he is infallible on points of doctrine concerning faith and morals – according to the Catholic church. So what’s his beef about the 600-page Equality Bill? It limits the freedom of religious communities to ‘act in accordance with their beliefs’, he says, and ‘violates natural law’. He urges Britain’s Catholic bishops to fight the legislation with ‘missionary zeal’. By ‘natural law’ he appears to mean the right to discriminate against people on the grounds of some or all of the nine ‘protected characteristics’ contained in the bill. These are: age; disability; gender reassignment; marriage and civil partnership; pregnancy and maternity; race; religion and belief (including lack of belief); sex; and sexual orientation. Actually, the pope shouldn’t worry too much: discrimination legislation has never fully applied to religious groups anyway. Nobody has hauled the Catholic church to a tribunal to defend why women or married men can’t join the priesthood, for example. The new bill will similarly steer clear of preachers. It doesn’t propose making it illegal for a mosque to turn away, on the grounds of religion, a practising Buddhist who fancied a job as an imam, for instance; that would be plain silly. But churches, mosques, synagogues and temples also employ secular people, for gardening, secretarial, maintenance and other jobs. And those employees will have the full protection of the law once the bill is enacted. Any religious group that turns down a gay person for a secular job simply because he or she is gay will be treated the same as any other erring employer. The same applies to the other protected characteristics: race, sex, disability and the rest. That’s going to be the law of this country – as set down by our elected representatives in parliament. What right does the pope have to urge the Catholic bishops of Britain to fight it with ‘missionary zeal’? Should he get involved in politics at all? Yes, because he’s the spiritual leader of the world’s Catholics and, as such, they look to him for leadership and advice. People of faith would argue that their faith and their lives, which of course are shaped by politics, are indivisible. And our Human Rights Act, which also has detractors from all walks of life, allows him the same right to freedom of expression as everyone else in our diverse society. But that’s another legal can of worms altogether.last_img read more

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Tecno-Gru ups capacity

first_imgTecno-Gru initially ordered 24 rough-terrain cranes in December 2017. The order comprised three Terex RT 45 cranes and three Terex RT 45L cranes, both with a lifting capacity of 45 tonnes; 17 cranes from Terex’s Quadstar range; and one 86-tonne capacity Terex RT 90 rough-terrain crane.In January 2018, the Italian crane rental specialist added to its order with 10 rough-terrain units. The order included three 35-tonne capacity RT 35-1 cranes and seven 45-tonne capacity Terex RT 45L cranes.www.terex.comwww.tecno-gru-terexcranes.comlast_img read more

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